Skip header and navigation

Refine By

13 records – page 1 of 2.

A 14C age calibration curve for the last 60 ka: the Greenland-Hulu U/Th timescale and its impact on understanding the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in Western Eurasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91637
Source
J Hum Evol. 2008 Nov;55(5):772-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Weninger Bernhard
Jöris Olaf
Author Affiliation
Universität zu Köln, Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte, Radiocarbon Laboratory, Weyertal 125, 50923 Köln, Germany. b.weninger@uni-koeln.de
Source
J Hum Evol. 2008 Nov;55(5):772-81
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Calibration
China
Chronology as Topic
Climate
Greenland
Hominidae
Humans
Paleontology - methods
Radiometric Dating - methods
Abstract
This paper combines the data sets available today for 14C-age calibration of the last 60 ka. By stepwise synchronization of paleoclimate signatures, each of these sets of 14C-ages is compared with the U/Th-dated Chinese Hulu Cave speleothem records, which shows global paleoclimate change in high temporal resolution. By this synchronization we have established an absolute-dated Greenland-Hulu chronological framework, against which global paleoclimate data can be referenced, extending the 14C-age calibration curve back to the limits of the radiocarbon method. Based on this new, U/Th-based Greenland(Hulu) chronology, we confirm that the radiocarbon timescale underestimates calendar ages by several thousand years during most of Oxygen Isotope Stage 3. Major atmospheric 14C variations are observed for the period of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition, which has significant implications for dating the demise of the last Neandertals. The early part of "the transition" (with 14C ages > 35.0 ka 14C BP) coincides with the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion. This period is characterized by highly-elevated atmospheric 14C levels. The following period ca. 35.0-32.5 ka 14C BP shows a series of distinct large-scale 14C age inversions and extended plateaus. In consequence, individual archaeological 14C dates older than 35.0 ka 14C BP can be age-calibrated with relatively high precision, while individual dates in the interval 35.0-32.5 ka 14C BP are subject to large systematic age-'distortions,' and chronologies based on large data sets will show apparent age-overlaps of up to ca. 5,000 cal years. Nevertheless, the observed variations in past 14C levels are not as extreme as previously proposed ("Middle to Upper Paleolithic dating anomaly"), and the new chronological framework leaves ample room for application of radiocarbon dating in the age-range 45.0-25.0 ka 14C BP at high temporal resolution.
PubMed ID
18922563 View in PubMed
Less detail

An annotated chronology of the history of AIDS in Toronto: the first five years, 1981-1986.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170667
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2005;22(2):313-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Mark L Robertson
Author Affiliation
Scott Library, York University.
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2005;22(2):313-51
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - history - mortality - transmission
Chronology as Topic
Female
Health Policy - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Ontario
Abstract
The purpose of this annotated chronology is to help provide a framework for research into the history of the first five years of the AIDS epidemic in Canada but especially as it unfolded in Toronto, Canada. The chronological entries can be used to identify the order and relationship of particular themes, while the sources listed in the chronology can be used as points of reference for further investigations. This chronology is primarily derived from reports in key newspapers based in the Toronto region. Each chronological entry lists the sources which reported on the particular event.
PubMed ID
16482707 View in PubMed
Less detail

Filicide in Austria and Finland--a register-based study on all filicide cases in Austria and Finland 1995-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147230
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2009;9:74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Hanna Putkonen
Sabine Amon
Maria P Almiron
Jenny Yourstone Cederwall
Markku Eronen
Claudia Klier
Ellen Kjelsberg
Ghitta Weizmann-Henelius
Author Affiliation
Vanha Vaasa hospital, PO Box 13, 65381 Vaasa, Finland. hanna.putkonen@vvs.fi
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2009;9:74
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Austria - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Chronology as Topic
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Forensic Psychiatry
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infanticide
Male
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Filicide is the tragic crime of murdering one's own child. Previous research has found that the offending parents are commonly depressed and that suicide is often associated as an actual act or an intention. Yet, filicide is an underreported crime and previous studies have been strained with methodological problems. No comprehensive international studies on filicide have been presented in the literature until now.
This was a descriptive, comprehensive, register-based study of all filicides in Austria and Finland during 1995-2005. Filicide-suicide cases were also included.
Most of the perpetrators were the biological mothers; in Austria 72%, in Finland 52%. Suicide followed filicide either as an attempt or a fulfilled act in 32% and 54% of the cases in Austria and Finland, respectively. Psychotic mood disorders were diagnosed for 10% of the living perpetrators in Austria, and 12% in Finland. Non-psychotic depression was diagnosed in 9% of surviving perpetrators in Austria, 35% in Finland.
The data from the two countries demonstrated that filicide is such a multifaceted and rare phenomenon that national data from individual countries seldom offer sufficient scope for its thorough study. Further analyses are needed to produce a complete picture of filicide.
Notes
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2000 Jan;35(1):70-510684781
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2009;9:2719480648
Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 2000 Sep-Dec;23(5-6):541-611143951
Cites: Addiction. 2001 Feb;96 Suppl 1:S77-9211228080
Cites: Forensic Sci Int. 2001 Apr 1;117(3):199-20411248450
Cites: Forensic Sci Int. 2001 Jun 15;119(2):221-411376987
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 Feb;109(2):274-8311826207
Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 2002 Jan-Feb;25(1):1-1412089775
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Dec;92(12):1988-9312453821
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2003 May;160(5):947-5112727700
Cites: Med Sci Law. 2003 Apr;43(2):153-6912741661
Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 2003 Sep-Oct;26(5):493-51414522222
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 2004;(420):21-715128384
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Jun 2;291(21):2581-9015173149
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2004 Aug;110(2):98-10715233710
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1990 Apr;35(3):233-82340456
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 1991;15(1-2):45-552029671
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1991 Mar;26(2):83-52047909
Cites: Psychiatr Clin North Am. 1992 Sep;15(3):661-731409027
Cites: Pediatrics. 1993 Feb;91(2):330-78424006
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1993 Oct;147(10):1097-1008213682
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1995 Aug;152(8):1216-87625476
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1996 Jun;53(6):497-5018639032
Cites: Med Sci Law. 1996 Oct;36(4):299-3058918104
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1997 Mar;170:205-289229027
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 Apr;66(4):412-715816781
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;162(9):1578-8716135615
Cites: J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2005;33(4):496-50416394226
Cites: Inj Prev. 2006 Jun;12(3):178-8216751449
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;64(3):345-5217339523
Cites: J Am Acad Psychiatry Law. 2007;35(1):74-8217389348
Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 2007 May-Jun;30(3):248-5417408742
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2007 Sep;191:253-717766767
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2008 Oct;69(10):1625-3119192446
Cites: Epidemiol Psichiatr Soc. 2000 Jul-Sep;9(3):171-8911094839
PubMed ID
19930581 View in PubMed
Less detail

Identification of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186049
Source
N Engl J Med. 2003 May 15;348(20):1995-2005
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2003
Author
Susan M Poutanen
Donald E Low
Bonnie Henry
Sandy Finkelstein
David Rose
Karen Green
Raymond Tellier
Ryan Draker
Dena Adachi
Melissa Ayers
Adrienne K Chan
Danuta M Skowronski
Irving Salit
Andrew E Simor
Arthur S Slutsky
Patrick W Doyle
Mel Krajden
Martin Petric
Robert C Brunham
Allison J McGeer
Author Affiliation
Toronto Medical Laboratories and Mount Sinai Hospital Department of Microbiology, Toronto, Canada.
Source
N Engl J Med. 2003 May 15;348(20):1995-2005
Date
May-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Chronology as Topic
Contact Tracing
Cough - etiology
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Progression
Dyspnea - etiology
Family Health
Female
Fever - etiology
Humans
Lung - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - complications - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a condition of unknown cause that has recently been recognized in patients in Asia, North America, and Europe. This report summarizes the initial epidemiologic findings, clinical description, and diagnostic findings that followed the identification of SARS in Canada.
SARS was first identified in Canada in early March 2003. We collected epidemiologic, clinical, and diagnostic data from each of the first 10 cases prospectively as they were identified. Specimens from all cases were sent to local, provincial, national, and international laboratories for studies to identify an etiologic agent.
The patients ranged from 24 to 78 years old; 60 percent were men. Transmission occurred only after close contact. The most common presenting symptoms were fever (in 100 percent of cases) and malaise (in 70 percent), followed by nonproductive cough (in 100 percent) and dyspnea (in 80 percent) associated with infiltrates on chest radiography (in 100 percent). Lymphopenia (in 89 percent of those for whom data were available), elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels (in 80 percent), elevated aspartate aminotransferase levels (in 78 percent), and elevated creatinine kinase levels (in 56 percent) were common. Empirical therapy most commonly included antibiotics, oseltamivir, and intravenous ribavirin. Mechanical ventilation was required in five patients. Three patients died, and five have had clinical improvement. The results of laboratory investigations were negative or not clinically significant except for the amplification of human metapneumovirus from respiratory specimens from five of nine patients and the isolation and amplification of a novel coronavirus from five of nine patients. In four cases both pathogens were isolated.
SARS is a condition associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. It appears to be of viral origin, with patterns suggesting droplet or contact transmission. The role of human metapneumovirus, a novel coronavirus, or both requires further investigation.
Notes
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 2003 Aug 14;349(7):709-11; author reply 709-1112917312
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 2003 May 15;348(20):1948-5112748314
PubMed ID
12671061 View in PubMed
Less detail

Kidney transplantations in the Nordic countries, 1956-1978.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246365
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol Suppl. 1980;54:3-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
C G Groth
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol Suppl. 1980;54:3-5
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronology as Topic
Denmark
Finland
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Norway
Sweden
Vital statistics
PubMed ID
7013038 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term fire frequency not linked to prehistoric occupations in northern Swedish boreal forest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95636
Source
Ecology. 2007 Feb;88(2):465-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Carcaillet Christopher
Bergman Ingela
Delorme Séverine
Hornberg Greger
Zackrisson Olle
Author Affiliation
Center of Bio-Archaeology and Ecology (UMR5059 CNRS/USTL/EPHE), Institut de Botanique, 163 rue Broussonet, F-34090 Montpellier, France. carcaillet@univ-montp2.fr
Source
Ecology. 2007 Feb;88(2):465-77
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Archaeology
Chronology as Topic
Climate
Ecosystem
Fires
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Humans
Pinus sylvestris
Sweden
Abstract
Knowledge of past fire regimes is crucial for understanding the changes in fire frequency that are likely to occur during the coming decades as a result of global warming and land-use change. This is a key issue for the sustainable management of forest biodiversity because fire regimes may be controlled by vegetation, human activities, and/or climate. The present paper aims to reconstruct the pattern of fire frequency over the Holocene at three sites located in the same region in the northern Swedish boreal forest. The fire regime is reconstructed from sedimentary charcoal analysis of small lakes or ponds. This method allows fire events to be characterized, after detrending the charcoal influx series, and allows estimation of the time elapsed between fires. The long-term fire regime, in terms of fire-free intervals, can thus be elucidated. At the three sites, the mean fire-free intervals through the Holocene were long and of similar magnitude (approximately 320 years). This similarity suggests that the ecological processes controlling fire ignition and spread were the same. At the three sites, the intervals were shorter before 8600 cal yr BP (calibrated years before present), between 7500 and 4500 cal yr BP, and after 2500 cal yr BP. Geomorphological and vegetation factors cannot explain the observed change, because the three sites are located in the same large ecological region characterized by Pinus sylvestris-Ericaceae mesic forests, established on morainic deposits at the same elevation. Archaeological chronologies also do not match the fire chronologies. A climatic interpretation is therefore the most likely explanation of the long-term regional pattern of fire. Although recent human activities between the 18th and the 20th centuries have clearly affected the fire regime, the dominant factor controlling it for 10000 years in northern Sweden has probably been climatic.
PubMed ID
17479764 View in PubMed
Less detail

Millennium malady. Part 1: Commentary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201695
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Jun;45:1546-7, 1558-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
J. Boyle
Author Affiliation
College of Family Physicians of Canada.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Jun;45:1546-7, 1558-9
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chronology as Topic
Computer Systems
Disaster planning
Family Practice
Humans
Time
PubMed ID
10386221 View in PubMed
Less detail

Millennium malady. Part 2: Diagnostic and treatment plan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201694
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Jun;45:1548, 1560
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
J. Boyle
Author Affiliation
College of Family Physicians of Canada.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Jun;45:1548, 1560
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chronology as Topic
Computer Systems
Disaster planning
Family Practice
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Liability, Legal
Time
PubMed ID
10386222 View in PubMed
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.