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Acute mastoiditis in Greenland between 1994-2007

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96607
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1335
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Author
Homøe, P
Jensen, RG
Brofeldt, S
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark. phom@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;10(2):1335
Date
Apr-Jun-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute mastoiditis
Acute otitis media (AOM)
Antibiotics
Arctic
Auricle
Bacteriological examination
Childhood
Chronic otitis media
Facial nerve paralysis
Indigenous populations
National Greenland Inpatient Register
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The indigenous populations of the Arctic are prone to middle ear infections starting with an early age first episode, followed by frequent episodes of acute otitis media (AOM) during childhood. A high proportion develop chronic otitis media. Acute mastoiditis is a serious complication of AOM in childhood with postauricular swelling, erythema, and tenderness, protrusion of the auricle, high fever and general malaise. The disease may protrude intracranially. The incidence rates for acute mastoiditis in the Western world range from 1.2 to 4.2 cases/100 000 per year. There exists no epidemiological data on acute mastoiditis in the Arctic region. METHODS: A retrospective search was made for the WHO ICD-10 code DH70.0 (denoting acute mastoiditis) using the National Greenland Inpatient Register for the period 1994-2007, inclusive. Fifteen patients were registered and their medical records were retrieved. Four patients were obviously misclassified, leaving 11 patients for evaluation. The medical records were available for 10 patients. The diagnostic inclusion criterion was written clinical signs of acute mastoiditis. RESULTS: Based on the case series the incidence rate was calculated to be 1.4 for the total Greenlandic population and 7.4 for children 0 and 10 years of age. Median age was 14 months (5-105 months) and eight were female (72%). Seven of the 10 were exclusively treated with antibiotics and three underwent additional ear surgery. Bacteriological examination was performed in five of 10. One 8 month-old girl presented with a contemporary facial nerve paralysis and was treated with intravenous antibiotics; one 8 year-old girl was evacuated to Copenhagen for urgent surgery due to signs of meningitis. Acute CT scan showed a cerebellar abscess and a thrombosis in the lateral sigmoid sinus vein. An extensive cholesteatoma was found and eradicated during surgery. Six weeks later the patient returned home with a maximal conductive hearing loss as the only complication. All patients recovered from the disease. CONCLUSION: The incidence of acute mastoiditis in Greenland is comparable to the incidence elsewhere, although AOM occurs more frequently among small children in the Greenlandic population. The disease is serious and must be treated immediately with intravenous antibiotics, followed by urgent surgery if there is no improvement.
PubMed ID
20568909 View in PubMed
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Bottle feeding and Chronic Otitis Media in Eskimo children in Labrador

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85536
Source
Pages 250-251 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
BOM·LE 1!'.EJIDlNG AND CHHONlC O'l'ITIS MEDIA lN &SKDIO CHlWERN IN LABRADOR F.J.W.T i mm er man s, s.s.G e r_a on (Halifax,_ Canada) The very high incidence of chronic otitis media in bottle fed exk:imo children i·s compared to the much lower incidence in breast fed children. 315
  1 document  
Author
F.J. Timmermans, S.S. Gerson
Author Affiliation
Halifax, Canada
Source
Pages 250-251 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Date
1978
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
children, Eskimo, Labrador, Chronic Otitis Media, bottle feeding
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Source
Pages 412-413 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
! . • ' t , ~ : •• t i ~ ! • ' . i i f l ' . ' . ! !' ~· . ;· :· ' ; ~ ( ~ . ' i : §: . ~ . . . . . ~ ( : ~ . ~ , :: ·' . i -~ Commentaries • "The relationship between suboptimal nutrition and chronic otitis media in Inuit children in the eastern Arctic," by
  1 document  
Source
Pages 412-413 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Chronic otitis media
Nutritional Status
Surgical technique
Tympanoplasty
Notes
"The relationship between suboptimal nutrition and chronic otitis media in Inuit children in the eastern Arctic" (P.J. Manning and M.E. Avery)
Reconstructive middle ear surgery in Alaskan Natives" (J.D. Williams)
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Evolving attitude in Canada towards the treatment of chronic otitis media in its Inuit (Eskimo) population

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85529
Source
Pages 243 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
THE PiVOLVINGATTITUDE IN CANADA TOWARDS Till: TRfilTllENT OF CHRONIC chronic otitis media has been a major health problem in the Inuits in CaJJ.ada. The reaBOns why there .have been
  1 document  
Author
J.D. Baxter
Author Affiliation
Montreal, Canada
Source
Pages 243 in Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. The Abstracts Accepted for the IV International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Volume II.
Date
1978
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Attitude
Canada
Chronic otitis media
Eskimo
Inuit
Population
Documents
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Hearing loss and otitis media in Keewatin children, NWT

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102276
Source
Pages 693-696 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
. Baxter JD. Chronic otitis media and hearing loss in the Eskimo population of Canada. Laryngoscope 1977; 87: 1528-1542 3. Spady DW. Between Two Worlds: the report of the Northwest Territories Perinatal and infant Mortality and Morbidity study. Occasional publication #16, Boreal Institute for
  1 document  
Author
Woods, W
Moffatt, M.E.K
Young, T.K
O'Neil, J
Tate, R
Gillespie, I
Author Affiliation
Northern Health Research Unit, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Source
Pages 693-696 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Acute otitis media
Audiogram
Children
Chronic otitis media
Discharge
Ear disease
Hearing loss
Hearing test
Inuit
Keewatin Health Survey
Perforation
Tympanometry
Abstract
The Keewatin Health Survey was conducted in 1990 on a 20% random sample of the children in 8 communities. A total of 307 children 0 to 11 years were examined. An ear examination was performed, and each ear was classified as to the presence or absence of acute otitis media, perforation, discharge, and scarring. A hearing screening exam was carried out by an audiologist, and an expanded hearing test was done on those who failed the screen (this was not possible for the very young), and tympanometry was performed. Twenty-seven percent of children (0 to 11 years) had evidence of otitis media, discharge, or perforation in one or both ears. This varied widely between communities, ranging from 8% to 45% (p=.005). There were no significant associations between the presence of otitis media and sex, housing type, crowding, presence of modern conveniences as a measure of SES, age, or hemoglobin. Approximately 10% of children under 12 had hearing loss for conversational speech, and a similar number had high-frequency loss. Otitis media and hearing loss are common in this population. Otitis media could not be clearly associated with socioeconomic variables other than community. Ear disease is a major health concern, but this cross-sectional survey does not further our knowledge of etiology.
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Source
Pages 665-668 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
paper describes the follow-up of a cohort of Inuit with chronic otitis media who were idenlifi~d between January 1974 and April 1977. To the authors, who by long association with this ~pulat~on, were already aware of the otological disease pattern and audiological consequences, more mterestmg were
  1 document  
Author
Baxter, J.D
Stubbing, P
Goodbody, L
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology and the McGill/Baffin Program, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec
Baffin Regional Hospital, Iqaluit, NWT
Source
Pages 665-668 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Audiology
Canada
Children
Chronic otitis media
Cohort study
Educational achievements
Followup
Inuit
Nakasuk Project
Otological examination
Sociological observations
Suppurative otitis media
Abstract
This paper describes the followup of a cohort of Inuit with chronic otitis media who were identified between January 1974 and April 1977. To the authors, who by long association with this population were already aware of the otological disease pattern and audiological consequences, more interesting were the sociological observations of this cohort. Their observations are based on both data and specific personal observations made during the past two decades and focus on a substantial proportion of the first large group of Inuit in the Eastern Canadian Arctic to whom high-quality "Southern" education was available to a postsecondary level in their home community. As such, they reflect what has happened to many Inuit in the Arctic who were children in the mid-70s and who are now in their 20s with their own school-age children.
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Otitis media in the Keewatin: 20 years of experience 1970-1991

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102272
Source
Pages 652-657 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
rate was 57%; 25% of ears had an improved audiogram. The success rate of surgery has not improved over the last two decades. Alternative means to prevention and early treatment of middle ear infections and promotion of the use of devices to protect hearing are needed. Chronic otitis media is a
  1 document  
Author
Duval, L
MacDonald, S
Lugtig, L
Mollins, J
Tate, R
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Source
Pages 652-657 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Antibiotics
Audiogram
Canada
Chronic otitis media
Eardrum
Hearing
Middle ear infection
Keewatin
Northwest Territories
Otitis media
Perforation
Prevalence
Success rate
Surgery
Tympanoplasty
Abstract
One hundred forty-three tympanoplasties were performed on 102 individuals between the years 1980 and 1991 and were followed up in 1992-93. The followup rate was 65%. The success rate of surgery when healed perforation was used as the criteria was 60%; when normal tympanogram was the criteria, the success rate was 57%; 25% of ears had an improved audiogram. The success rate of surgery has not improved over the last two decades. Alternative means to prevention and early treatment of middle ear infections and promotion of the use of devices to protect hearing are needed.
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7 records – page 1 of 1.