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Access to and continuity of primary medical care of different providers as perceived by the Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164689
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2007 Mar;25(1):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Pirjo Halonen
Arto Vehviläinen
Jorma Takala
Esko Kumpusalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Unit of Family Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. pekka.mantyselka@uku.fi
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2007 Mar;25(1):27-32
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - therapy
Community Health Centers - standards - statistics & numerical data
Continuity of Patient Care
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector
Public Sector
Questionnaires
Abstract
To study people's views on the accessibility and continuity of primary medical care provided by different providers: a public primary healthcare centre (PPHC), occupational healthcare (OHC), and a private practice (PP).
A nationwide population-based questionnaire study.
Finland.
A total of 6437 (from a sample of 10,000) Finns aged 15-74 years.
Period of time (in days) to get an appointment with any physician was assessed via a single structured question. Accessibility and continuity were evaluated with a five-category Likert scale. Values 4-5 were regarded as good.
Altogether 72% had found that they could obtain an appointment with a physician within three days, while 6% had to wait more than two weeks. Older subjects and subjects with chronic diseases perceived waiting times as longer more often than younger subjects and those without chronic diseases. The proportion of subjects who perceived access to care to be good was 35% in a PPHC, 68% in OHC, and 78% in a PP. The proportion of subjects who were able to get successive appointments with the same doctor was 45% in a PPHC, 68% in OHC, and 81% in a PP. A personal doctor system was related to good continuity and access in a PPHC.
Access to and continuity of care in Finland are suboptimal for people suffering from chronic diseases. The core features of good primary healthcare are still not available within the medical care provided by public health centres.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17354156 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with chronic disease. Are they receiving comprehensive health care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241399
Source
J Adolesc Health Care. 1983 Dec;4(4):261-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
G. Carroll
E. Massarelli
A. Opzoomer
G. Pekeles
M. Pedneault
J Y Frappier
N. Onetto
Source
J Adolesc Health Care. 1983 Dec;4(4):261-5
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Medicine
Canada
Chronic Disease - therapy
Comprehensive Health Care
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
A survey of adolescents with a chronic disease attending six specialty clinics was conducted to determine the sources of their primary health care and to estimate the extent of unmet health needs. Sixty-one patients completed a self-administered questionnaire. Forty percent had no source of primary care other than the subspecialty clinic treating their chronic condition. Seventy-eight percent regarded the subspecialist as their "personal" physician, although only 27% actually spoke to this physician about their general health needs. For 44% general health needs were not being met. These findings suggest that these adolescents expect the subspecialty clinic to provide primary care; yet they receive, at best, fragmented health care. This situation could be improved by a decision on the part of the subspecialty to restrict its role to providing only specific specialty care or to coordinate overall care.
PubMed ID
6643204 View in PubMed
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Adoption of the chronic care model to improve HIV care: in a marginalized, largely aboriginal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113082
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Jun;59(6):650-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
David Tu
Patricia Belda
Doreen Littlejohn
Jeanette Somlak Pedersen
Juan Valle-Rivera
Mark Tyndall
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Native Health Society, 449 Hastings St E, Vancouver, BC V6A 1P5, Canada. davidtu9@gmail.com
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Jun;59(6):650-7
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Chronic Disease - therapy
Community Health Centers
Female
HIV Seropositivity - ethnology - therapy
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medication Adherence - ethnology
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient care team
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - prevention & control
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Social Marginalization
Syphilis - diagnosis
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis
Urban Health Services
Viral Load
Abstract
To measure the effectiveness of implementing the chronic care model (CCM) in improving HIV clinical outcomes.
Multisite, prospective, interventional cohort study.
Two urban community health centres in Vancouver and Prince George, BC.
Two hundred sixty-nine HIV-positive patients (18 years of age or older) who received primary care at either of the study sites.
Systematic implementation of the CCM during an 18-month period.
Documented pneumococcal vaccination, documented syphilis screening, documented tuberculosis screening, antiretroviral treatment (ART) status, ART status with undetectable viral load, CD4 cell count of less than 200 cells/mL, and CD4 cell count of less than 200 cells/mL while not taking ART compared during a 36-month period.
Overall, 35% of participants were women and 59% were aboriginal persons. The mean age was 45 years and most participants had a history of injection drug use that was the presumed route of HIV transmission. During the study follow-up period, 39 people died, and 11 transferred to alternate care providers. Compared with their baseline clinical status, study participants showed statistically significant (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
23766052 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of gender equity in different models of primary care practices in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144701
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:151
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Simone Dahrouge
William Hogg
Meltem Tuna
Grant Russell
Rose Anne Devlin
Peter Tugwell
Elisabeth Kristjansson
Author Affiliation
C.T. Lamont Primary Health Care Research Centre, Elisabeth Bruyère Research Institute, Ontario, Canada. sdahrouge@bruyere.org
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:151
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Models, organizational
Ontario
Prejudice
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Sex Factors
Abstract
The World Health Organization calls for more work evaluating the effect of health care reforms on gender equity in developed countries. We performed this evaluation in Ontario, Canada where primary care models resulting from reforms co-exist.
This cross sectional study of primary care practices uses data collected in 2005-2006. Healthcare service models included in the study consist of fee for service (FFS) based, salaried, and capitation based. We compared the quality of care delivered to women and men in practices of each model. We performed multi-level, multivariate regressions adjusting for patient socio-demographic and economic factors to evaluate vertical equity, and adjusting for these and health factors in evaluating horizontal equity. We measured seven dimensions of health service delivery (e.g. accessibility and continuity) and three dimensions of quality of care using patient surveys (n = 5,361) and chart abstractions (n = 4,108).
Health service delivery measures were comparable in women and men, with differences
Notes
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Cites: Milbank Q. 2001;79(4):613-39, v11789119
PubMed ID
20331861 View in PubMed
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Annual visits to GPs by elderly patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206434
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Feb 10;158(3):299-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1998

Association between forgone care and household income among the elderly in five Western European countries - analyses based on survey data from the SHARE-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89561
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2009;9:52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Mielck Andreas
Kiess Raphael
von dem Knesebeck Olaf
Stirbu Irina
Kunst Anton E
Author Affiliation
Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Health Economics and Health Care Management, PO Box 1129, 85758 Neuherberg, Germany. mielck@helmholtz-muenchen.de
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2009;9:52
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - therapy
Europe
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Health status
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Studies on the association between access to health care and household income have rarely included an assessment of 'forgone care', but this indicator could add to our understanding of the inverse care law. We hypothesize that reporting forgone care is more prevalent in low income groups. METHODS: The study is based on the 'Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)', focusing on the non-institutionalized population aged 50 years or older. Data are included from France, Germany, Greece, Italy and Sweden. The dependent variable is assessed by the following question: During the last twelve months, did you forgo any types of care because of the costs you would have to pay, or because this care was not available or not easily accessible? The main independent variable is household income, adjusted for household size and split into quintiles, calculating the quintile limits for each country separately. Information on age, sex, self assessed health and chronic disease is included as well. Logistic regression models were used for the multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The overall level of forgone care differs considerably between the five countries (e.g. about 10 percent in Greece and 6 percent in Sweden). Low income groups report forgone care more often than high income groups. This association can also be found in analyses restricted to the subsample of persons with chronic disease. Associations between forgone care and income are particularly strong in Germany and Greece. Taking the example of Germany, forgone care in the lowest income quintile is 1.98 times (95% CI: 1.08-3.63) as high as in the highest income quintile. CONCLUSION: Forgone care should be reduced even if it is not justified by an 'objective' need for health care, as it could be an independent stressor in its own right, and as patient satisfaction is a strong predictor of compliance. These efforts should focus on population groups with particularly high prevalence of forgone care, for example on patients with poor self assessed health, on women, and on low income groups. The inter-country differences point to the need to specify different policy recommendations for different countries.
PubMed ID
19309496 View in PubMed
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Association between perceived unmet health care needs and risk of adverse health outcomes among patients with chronic medical conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113780
Source
Open Med. 2013;7(1):e21-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Paul E Ronksley
Claudia Sanmartin
Hude Quan
Pietro Ravani
Marcello Tonelli
Braden Manns
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Open Med. 2013;7(1):e21-30
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Chronic Disease - therapy
Confidence Intervals
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Adults with chronic medical conditions are more likely to report unmet health care needs. Whether unmet health care needs are associated with an increased risk of adverse health outcomes is unclear.
Adults with at least one self-reported chronic condition (arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, hypertension, mood disorder, stroke) from the 2001 and 2003 cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey were linked to national hospitalization data. Participants were followed from the date of their survey until March 31, 2005, for the primary outcomes of all-cause and cause-specific admission to hospital. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, 30-day and 1-year all-cause readmission to hospital, and in-hospital death. Negative binomial regression models were used to estimate the association between unmet health care needs, admission to hospital, and length of stay, with adjustment for socio-demographic variables, health behaviours, and health status. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between unmet needs, readmission, and in-hospital death. Further analyses were conducted by type of unmet need.
Of the 51 932 adults with self-reported chronic disease, 15.5% reported an unmet health care need. Participants with unmet health care needs had a risk of all-cause admission to hospital similar to that of patients with no unmet needs (adjusted rate ratio [RR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.94-1.15). When stratified by type of need, participants who reported issues of limited resource availability had a slightly higher risk of hospital admission (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.09-1.28). There was no association between unmet needs and length of stay, readmission, or in-hospital death.
Overall, unmet health care needs were not associated with an increased risk of admission to hospital among those with chronic conditions. However, certain types of unmet needs may be associated with higher or lower risk. Whether unmet needs are associated with other measures of resource use remains to be determined.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23687534 View in PubMed
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Beliefs and experiences can influence patient participation in handover between primary and secondary care--a qualitative study of patient perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259773
Source
BMJ Qual Saf. 2012 Dec;21 Suppl 1:i76-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Maria Flink
Gunnar Öhlén
Helen Hansagi
Paul Barach
Mariann Olsson
Source
BMJ Qual Saf. 2012 Dec;21 Suppl 1:i76-83
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - therapy
Communication
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Handoff
Patient Participation - psychology
Primary Health Care - standards
Qualitative Research
Secondary Care - standards
Sweden
Systems Analysis
Abstract
Communication between healthcare settings at patient transfers between primary and secondary care, 'handover', is a critical and risky process for patients. Patients' views on their roles in these processes are often lacking despite the knowledge that patient participation contributes to enhanced safety and wellbeing.
This study aims to improve the knowledge and understanding of patients' perspectives about their participation in handover.
Twenty-three Swedish patients with chronic diseases were individually interviewed about their experiences with handovers between three clinical microsystems: emergency room, emergency ward and primary healthcare centres. Data were analysed using inductive qualitative content analysis.
Patients participated within the microsystems by exchanging information, and between microsystems by making contact with and conveying information to their next healthcare provider. Enablers for participation included positive encounters with providers, patient empowerment and beliefs about organisational factors. Patients' trust in their providers, and providers' attitudes were important factors in patients' willingness to communicate. Patients who thought medical records access was shared across microsystems volunteered less information to their providers. Patients with experiences of non-effective handovers took more responsibility in the handover to ensure continuity of care.
Patients participate actively in handovers when they feel a need for involvement to ensure continuity of care, and are less active when they perceive that their contribution is unnecessary or not valued. In acute care settings with short hospital stays and less time to establish a trusting relationship between patients and their providers, discharge encounters may be important enablers for patient engagement in handovers. The advantages of a redundant handover process need to be considered.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23112289 View in PubMed
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Better for ourselves and better for our patients: chronic disease management in primary care networks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162492
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(3):70-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Barbara Every
Author Affiliation
Capital Health, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(3):70-4
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease - therapy
Disease Management
Humans
Physicians, Family
Primary Health Care - standards
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration
Abstract
Capital Health in Edmonton, Alberta, implemented a system-wide chronic disease management model to support people with chronic disease and their primary care physicians. Groups of family physicians, in partnership with the health region, developed primary care networks to provide services that are customized to meet the priorities of the local community. Management of chronic disease is a cornerstone service, and diabetes management is the most fully developed program. Key to its success are standardized protocols, consistent follow-up and patient education by trained primary care nurses. This model will be used as a template for the management of other chronic diseases.
PubMed ID
17626549 View in PubMed
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116 records – page 1 of 12.