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151 records – page 1 of 16.

Ability OnLine: children in hospital now in touch with the world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214112
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Lefebvre
M. McClure
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Communication Aids for Disabled
Computer Communication Networks - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology
Humans
Organizational Innovation
Peer Group
Self Concept
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Abstract
Health prevention seeks to avoid the onset of disease or symptoms by eliminating or at least minimizing environmental factors that increase the risk of illness. This article describes Ability OnLine, an innovative program designed to reduce the isolation young people can experience in a healthcare facility or when confined to their home. The electronic bulletin board is a friendly platform for disabled and chronically ill children to easily communicate with their peers and adult and teen mentors.
PubMed ID
10172531 View in PubMed
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Acceptance, avoidance, and ambiguity: conflicting social values about childhood disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170909
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Carol Levine
Author Affiliation
Families and Health Care Project, United Hospital Fund, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Chronic Disease - psychology
Data Collection
Dependency (Psychology)
Disabled Children - psychology
Family Relations
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Parents - psychology
Quebec
Respiration, Artificial - ethics - psychology
Siblings - psychology
Social Isolation
Social Justice
Social Values
Ventilators, Mechanical
Abstract
Advances in medical technology now permit children who need ventilator assistance to live at home rather than in hospitals or institutions. What does this ventilator-dependent life mean to children and their families? The impetus for this essay comes from a study of the moral experience of 12 Canadian families--parents, ventilator-dependent child, and well siblings. These families express great love for their children, take on enormous responsibilities for care, live with uncertainty, and attempt to create "normal" home environments. Nevertheless, they experience social isolation, sometimes even from their extended families and health care providers. Their lives are constrained in many ways. The challenges faced by parents of technology-dependent children raise questions of justice within society and within families.
PubMed ID
16453960 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of disability and sense of coherence in individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47367
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2003 Sep;12(5):770-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Britta Berglund
Anne-Cathrine Mattiasson
Gun Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. britta.berglund@omv.ki.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2003 Sep;12(5):770-7
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease - psychology
Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sickness Impact Profile
Sweden
Abstract
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a relatively rare, inherited connective tissue disorder and skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility, chronic joint and limb pain, blood vessel and tissue fragility are frequent symptoms. The aims of this study were to describe the degree to which individuals with EDS accept and cope with perceived limitations related to the syndrome, and to determine the relationships between acceptance of disability (AD), sense of coherence (SOC), functional health status and background data. Four questionnaires were mailed: the AD scale Modified (ADM), the SOC Scale, the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and a background form. The respondents with EDS were recruited through the EDS National Association in Sweden and the response rate was 74% (69 females and eight males). The Ethical Committee at Huddinge University Hospital (ref. no. 152/95) approved the study. This study has shown that the level of AD and SOC in individuals with EDS is similar to other patient groups, e.g. individuals with ostomy and with diabetes. Further, the SOC was in concordance with that of the general population. Those working full-time accepted their disability to a greater degree than those on sick leave or disability pension. A multiple regression analysis showed that a greater AD was associated with a higher level of SOC and a better functional health status. The SOC and SIP together accounted for 50% of the variance in the ADM. For health promotion in nursing practice it is important to have insight into the problem areas which may influence the overall life situation for an individual with EDS. A key issue for nurses is to identify individuals with low acceptance of their disease and/or low SOC in order to support these persons' adaptation process. Future research on EDS may be directed towards projects focusing on the development and implementation of models to strengthen the level of AD and SOC in this group.
PubMed ID
12919224 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' experiences of well-being when living with a long-term illness or disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87534
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):419-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Berntsson Leeni
Berg Marie
Brydolf Marianne
Hellström Anna-Lena
Author Affiliation
The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden. leeni.berntsson@fhs.gu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):419-25
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Friends - psychology
Happiness
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Personal Satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Sick Role
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Present-day society has produced changes in family living patterns and conditions and this has resulted in new stressors and health problems. Most children and adolescents with chronic diseases and disabilities, who were previously cared for at hospitals and institutions for long periods, are now integrated in society and they are expected to live a normal life in the conditions that currently prevail. The number of young people with long-term illnesses/disability has increased worldwide during the last decades. There is lack of studies relating to the way young people regard their daily lives and factors that are important for their well-being. The aim of this study was to describe the meaning of feeling good in daily life in adolescents living with a long-term illness or disability. Eight boys and seven girls, aged between 12 and 19 years, with different conditions of long-term illness or disability, participated in the study. Tape-recorded interviews were conducted between the years 2003-2004 and the data were analysed using content analysis. The results revealed that the adolescents with long-term illness generally experienced well-being like everybody else. Three themes were found to be important in order to feel good: 'a feeling of acceptance of illness/disability as a natural part of life', 'a feeling of support' and 'a feeling of personal growth'. This study concludes that adolescents with long-term illness or disabilities experience well-being when they are allowed to prepare for living a normal life integrated in society.
PubMed ID
18036004 View in PubMed
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Aging or disease? Cardiovascular reactivity in Finnish men over the middle years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208340
Source
Psychol Aging. 1997 Jun;12(2):225-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
J R Jennings
T. Kamarck
S. Manuck
S A Everson
G. Kaplan
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA. injenn@vms.cis.pitt.edu
Source
Psychol Aging. 1997 Jun;12(2):225-38
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Finland
Hemodynamics - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychological Tests
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Cardiovascular responses to psychological events may mediate the influence of stress on cardiovascular disease. In this study the authors asked whether cardiovascular responses to psychological challenge changed with age and whether such changes were intrinsic to aging or could be attributed to the influence of disease and medications. Cardiovascular reactivity to mental challenge was examined in 902 men ranging in age from 46 to 64 years who participated in the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. A battery of 4 tasks was used to induce cardiovascular responses. Current disease status, age, and medication use were entered into hierarchical regression analyses to assess their relation with measures of cardiovascular reactivity. Age and hypertension contributed independent, approximately equal, but small amounts of variance in the cardiac and vascular reactivity indexes. Medications also influenced reactivity independently of age and disease. Performance on the tasks was more consistently altered by age than by disease or medication. Cardiac and vascular reactivity increased with increasing age and the presence of hypertension. The authors conclude that both age and disease state must be considered when examining cardiovascular reactivity as a risk factor for disease.
PubMed ID
9189982 View in PubMed
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The association of parental alcoholism and rigidity with chronic illness and abuse among women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223455
Source
J Fam Pract. 1992 Jul;35(1):54-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
N A Radomsky
Author Affiliation
Parsons Clinic, Red Deer, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Fam Pract. 1992 Jul;35(1):54-60
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Alcoholism - psychology
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Depression - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parents - psychology
Personality
Primary Health Care
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Abstract
This study determined whether women in a primary care practice who described one or both of their parents as alcohol dependent (group A) or harsh, rigid, or difficult (group B) were more likely to have chronic illness than women who denied having parents with these characteristics (group C).
A consecutive sample of 120 women scheduled for comprehensive physical examinations were interviewed to determine parental characteristics, demographic data (age, education, employment, and marital status), and clinical information (chronic illness and lifetime surgeries). In addition, all women were asked standardized questions about sexual and physical abuse.
The overall difference among the groups for women with a history of chronic illness was significant (P less than .001). More women in groups A (55%) and B (48%) were identified with chronic illness than in group C (18%). Women in groups A and B also reported more sexual and physical abuse (32% and 44%, respectively) than women in group C (8% [P less than .001]). Women identifying abuse were diagnosed with more chronic illness (67%, compared with 25% [P less than .001]) and more lifetime surgeries (3.3 compared with 1.75 [P less than .05]) than women denying abuse.
Parental alcoholism and parental rigidity were associated with increased prevalence of chronic illness and physical or sexual abuse among women patients.
PubMed ID
1613476 View in PubMed
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Associations between chronic disease, age and physical and mental health status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150289
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2009;29(3):108-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
W M Hopman
M B Harrison
H. Coo
E. Friedberg
M. Buchanan
E G VanDenKerkhof
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre, Kingston General Hospital, ON, Canada. hopmanw@kgh.kari.net
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2009;29(3):108-16
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Comorbidity
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Heart Failure - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - epidemiology - psychology
Leg Ulcer - epidemiology - psychology
Linear Models
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - psychology
Osteoarthritis - epidemiology - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Research Design
Sex Factors
Abstract
This paper examines the associations between chronic disease, age, and physical and mental health-related quality of life (HRQOL), using data collected in 10 studies representing five chronic conditions. HRQOL was measured using the SF-36 or the shorter subset, SF-12. Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores were graphed by condition in age increments of 10 years, and compared to age- and sex-adjusted normative data. Linear regression models for the PCS and MCS were controlled for available confounders. The sample size of 2418 participants included 129 with renal failure, 366 with osteoarthritis (OA), 487 with heart failure, 1160 with chronic wound (leg ulcer) and 276 with multiple sclerosis (MS). For the PCS, there were large differences between the normative data and the mean scores of those with chronic diseases, but small differences for the MCS. Female gender and comorbid conditions were associated with poorer HRQOL; increased age was associated with poorer PCS and better MCS. This study provided additional evidence that, while physical function could be severely and negatively affected by both chronic disease and advanced age, mental health remained relatively high and stable.
PubMed ID
19527569 View in PubMed
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Attitudes toward patient expertise in chronic illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47881
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):303-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
S E Thorne
K. Ternulf Nyhlin
B L Paterson
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia School of Nursing, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):303-11
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Chronic Disease - psychology
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - psychology
Environmental Illness - psychology
Female
Gatekeeping
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Patient compliance
Physician-Patient Relations
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stereotyping
Sweden
Abstract
Although it has become an accepted standard to acknowledge the patient as a full partner in health care decisions, replacing traditional authoritative relationships with those based on an emancipatory model, the experiences of persons living with chronic illness confirm that this paradigm shift is not yet apparent in many health care relationships. In this paper, the authors present a qualitative secondary analysis of combined data sets from their research into chronic illness experience with two quite different chronic diseases - Type I Diabetes (a socially legitimized chronic disease) and Environmental Sensitivities (a disease which is currently treated with considerable scepticism). Comparing the experiences of individuals with diseases that are quite differently socially constructed, it becomes possible to detect common underlying health professional values and attitudes that powerfully influence the experience of living with and negotiating health care for a chronic illness. In the discussion of findings from this study, the authors examine the implications of the spiral of behaviors that fuels mutual alienation in chronic illness care relationships if professionals are unable to value patient expertise.
PubMed ID
10760537 View in PubMed
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Be generic and specific: quality of life measurement in clinical studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193790
Source
Ann Med. 2001 Jul;33(5):319-22
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Jul-2001

The bodily suffering of living with severe psoriasis: in-depth interviews with 22 hospitalized patients with psoriasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71757
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Feb;12(2):250-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Astrid Klopstad Wahl
Eva Gjengedal
Berit Rokne Hanestad
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health at Buskerud College, Norway.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2002 Feb;12(2):250-61
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Body Image
Chronic Disease - psychology
Cost of Illness
Female
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pain - etiology - psychology
Psoriasis - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Quality of Life
Self Concept
Social Isolation
Stereotyping
Abstract
Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic skin diseases. The author presented results from a qualitative study focusing on patients with severe psoriasis in an acute phase and their experience of living with the disease. Twenty-two hospitalized patients with psoriasis were interviewed in depth. The interviews were consecutively analyzed according to grounded theory methodology. Bodily suffering emerged as a core variable in the data. Bodily suffering includes the following categories: the visible body, staying on an even keel, coping with an all-consuming disease, and social vulnerability. The results of this study indicate that the criterion for the management of soriasis should be the patients' own perception of the consequences of the disease.
PubMed ID
11837374 View in PubMed
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151 records – page 1 of 16.