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The 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder according to DSM-IV, DSM-V, and ICD-10 among nondemented 75-year-olds in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124775
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Nilsson, J
Östling, S
Waern, M
Karlsson, B
SigstrÖm, R
Xinxin Guo
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Interview, Psychological
Life Style
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To examine the 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), and the overlap between these criteria, in a population sample of 75-year-olds. We also aimed to examine comorbidity between GAD and other psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression.
During 2005-2006, a comprehensive semistructured psychiatric interview was conducted by trained nurses in a representative population sample of 75-year-olds without dementia in Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 777; 299 men and 478 women). All psychiatric diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV. GAD was also diagnosed according to ICD-10 and DSM-V.
The 1-month prevalence of GAD was 4.1% (N = 32) according to DSM-IV, 4.5% (N = 35) according to DSM-V, and 3.7% (N = 29) according to ICD-10. Only 46.9% of those with DSM-IV GAD fulfilled ICD-10 criteria, and only 51.7% and 44.8% of those with ICD-10 GAD fulfilled DSM-IV/V criteria. Instead, 84.4% and 74.3% of those with DSM-IV/V GAD and 89.7% of those with ICD-10 GAD had depression. Also other psychiatric diagnoses were common in those with ICD-10 and DSM-IV GAD. Only a small minority with GAD, irrespective of criteria, had no other comorbid psychiatric disorder. ICD-10 GAD was related to an increased mortality rate.
While GAD was common in 75-year-olds, DSM-IV/V and ICD-10 captured different individuals. Current definitions of GAD may comprise two different expressions of the disease. There was greater congruence between GAD in either classification system and depression than between DSM-IV/V GAD and ICD-10 GAD, emphasizing the close link between these entities.
PubMed ID
22549369 View in PubMed
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Acceptability and concurrent validity of measures to predict older driver involvement in motor vehicle crashes: an Emergency Department pilot case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161383
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Frank J Molnar
Shawn C Marshall
Malcolm Man-Son-Hing
Keith G Wilson
Anna M Byszewski
Ian Stiell
Author Affiliation
CanDRIVE(1): a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Institute of Aging funded New Emerging Team, Elisabeth-Bruyère Research Institute, 43 Bruyère Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 5C8. fmolnar@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Automobile Driver Examination - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Head Movements
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Psychomotor Performance
Questionnaires
Reaction Time
Risk
Visual Fields
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Older drivers have one of the highest motor vehicle crash (MVC) rates per kilometer driven, largely due to the functional effects of the accumulation, and progression of age-associated medical conditions that eventually impact on fitness-to-drive. Consequently, physicians in many jurisdictions are legally mandated to report to licensing authorities patients who are judged to be medically at risk for MVCs. Unfortunately, physicians lack evidence-based tools to assess the fitness-to-drive of their older patients. This paper reports on a pilot study that examines the acceptability and association with MVC of components of a comprehensive clinical assessment battery.
To evaluate the acceptability to participants of components of a comprehensive assessment battery, and to explore potential predictors of MVC that can be employed in front-line clinical settings.
Case-control study of 10 older drivers presenting to a tertiary care hospital emergency department after involvement in an MVC and 20 age-matched controls.
The measures tested were generally found to be acceptable to participants. Positive associations (p
PubMed ID
17854579 View in PubMed
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Access to health services by Canadians who are chronically ill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174970
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2005 Jun;27(4):465-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Shannon M Spenceley
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2005 Jun;27(4):465-86
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Data Collection - standards
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Research Design - standards
Abstract
Access to health care services in Canada has been identified as an urgent priority, and chronic disease has been suggested as the most pressing health concern facing Canadians. Access to services for Canadians living with chronic disease, however, has received little emphasis in the research literature or in health policy reform documents. A systematic review of research into factors impeding or facilitating access to formal health services for people in Canada living with chronic illness is presented. The review includes 31 studies of Canadian populations published between 1990 and 2002; main results were analyzed for facilitators and barriers to access for people experiencing chronic disease. An underlying organizing construct of symmetry between consumers, providers, and the larger Canadian system is suggested as a relevant lens from which to view the findings. Finally, a discussion of the relationship between identified factors and the principles of primary health care is offered.
PubMed ID
15870244 View in PubMed
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Access to primary health care among homeless adults in Toronto, Canada: results from the Street Health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131318
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(2):e94-e103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Erika Khandor
Kate Mason
Catharine Chambers
Kate Rossiter
Laura Cowan
Stephen W Hwang
Author Affiliation
Toronto Public Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(2):e94-e103
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Communication Barriers
Cost of Illness
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Homeless Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Primary Health Care - economics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite experiencing a disproportionate burden of acute and chronic health issues, many homeless people face barriers to primary health care. Most studies on health care access among homeless populations have been conducted in the United States, and relatively few are available from countries such as Canada that have a system of universal health insurance. We investigated access to primary health care among a representative sample of homeless adults in Toronto, Canada.
Homeless adults were recruited from shelter and meal programs in downtown Toronto between November 2006 and February 2007. Cross-sectional data were collected on demographic characteristics, health status, health determinants and access to health care. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to investigate the association between having a family doctor as the usual source of health care (an indicator of access to primary care) and health status, proof of health insurance, and substance use after adjustment for demographic characteristics.
Of the 366 participants included in our study, 156 (43%) reported having a family doctor. After adjustment for potential confounders and covariates, we found that the odds of having a family doctor significantly decreased with every additional year spent homeless in the participant's lifetime (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.86-0.97). Having a family doctor was significantly associated with being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered (adjusted OR 2.70, 95% CI 1.04-7.00), having a health card (proof of health insurance coverage in the province of Ontario) (adjusted OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.61-4.89) and having a chronic medical condition (adjusted OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.03-3.53).
Less than half of the homeless people in Toronto who participated in our study reported having a family doctor. Not having a family doctor was associated with key indicators of health care access and health status, including increasing duration of homelessness, lack of proof of health insurance coverage and having a chronic medical condition. Increased efforts are needed to address the barriers to appropriate health care and good health that persist in this population despite the provision of health insurance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21915240 View in PubMed
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Action Schools! BC: a socioecological approach to modifying chronic disease risk factors in elementary school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170244
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Apr;3(2):A60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Patti-Jean Naylor
Heather M Macdonald
Katharine E Reed
Heather A McKay
Author Affiliation
School of Physical Education, Faculty of Education, University of Victoria, Box 3015, STN CSC, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada V8W 2P1. pjnaylor@uvic.ca
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Apr;3(2):A60
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Diet
Health Education - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Physical Education and Training - organization & administration - standards
Risk factors
Schools - organization & administration - standards
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Childhood physical inactivity and obesity are serious public health threats. Socioecological approaches to addressing these threats have been proposed. The school is a critical environment for promoting children's health and provides the opportunity to explore the impact of a socioecological approach.
Thirty percent of children in British Columbia, Canada, are overweight or obese, and 50% of youths are not physically active enough to yield health benefits.
Action Schools! BC, a socioecological model, was developed to create 1) an elementary school environment where students are provided with more opportunities to make healthy choices and 2) a supportive community and provincial environment to facilitate change at the school and individual levels.
The environment in British Columbia for school- and provincial-level action on health behaviors improved. Focus group and project tracking results indicated that the Action Schools! BC model enhanced the conceptual use of knowledge and was an influencing factor. Political will and public interest were also cited as influential factors.
The Action Schools! BC model required substantial and demanding changes in the approach of the researchers, policy makers, and support team toward health promotion. Despite challenges, Action Schools! BC provides a good example of how to enhance knowledge exchange and multilevel intersectoral action in chronic disease prevention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16539801 View in PubMed
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Activity limitation and chronic conditions in Canada's elderly, 1986-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201733
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 1999 May-Jun;21(5-6):196-210
Publication Type
Article
Author
E G Moore
M W Rosenberg
S H Fitzgibbon
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. mooree@post.queensu.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 1999 May-Jun;21(5-6):196-210
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Disabled Persons
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Prevalence
Social Support
Abstract
Together with all other developed countries, Canada's population is experiencing a significant increase in the proportion that is elderly. This paper examines basic linkages between individual ageing, the prevalence of various chronic health conditions, functional limitation and the receipt of help in activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) for the Canadian population using recent data from the National Population Health Survey (NPHS) as well as the Health and Activity Limitation Surveys (HALS) and the two General Social Surveys (GSS) with health data. Presented are age- and sex-specific prevalence of chronic conditions and logistic regression is used to assess the impacts of different chronic conditions on the receipt of help for IADL and ADL. The importance of gender and living alone in influencing the receipt of help and also of use of formal agencies is presented using additional data from HALS. Findings from these analyses are also used to project changes in the distribution of health status defined by disability and receipt of help with IADL/ADL and, secondarily, by chronic condition. These analyses imply increases in demand for a range of health related services which will be 50 to 100% greater than the growth in the total elderly population.
PubMed ID
10381232 View in PubMed
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Allostatic load and clinical risk as related to sense of coherence in middle-aged women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80436
Source
Psychosom Med. 2006 Sep-Oct;68(5):801-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lindfors Petra
Lundberg Olle
Lundberg Ulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Stockholm University and Centre for Health Equity Studies, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, SE 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. pls@psychology.su.se
Source
Psychosom Med. 2006 Sep-Oct;68(5):801-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aging - psychology
Attitude
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Menopause
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Personal Satisfaction
Physical Examination
Questionnaires
Risk
Stress - epidemiology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate how physiologic dysregulation, in terms of allostatic load and clinical risk, respectively, relates to sense of coherence (SOC) in women with no previously diagnosed pathology. METHODS: At baseline, 200 43-year-old women took part in a standardized medical health examination and completed a 3-item measure of SOC, which they completed again 6 years later. According to data from the medical examination, two different measures of physiologic dysregulation were calculated: a) a measure of allostatic load based on empirically derived cut points and b) a measure of clinical risk based on clinically significant cut points. RESULTS: In line with the initial hypotheses, allostatic load was found to predict future SOC, whereas clinical risk did not. In addition to baseline SOC and nicotine consumption, allostatic load was strongly associated with a weak SOC at the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The better predictive value of allostatic load to clinical risk indicates that focusing solely on clinical risk obscures patterns of physiologic dysregulation that influence future SOC.
PubMed ID
17012536 View in PubMed
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American Indian and Alaska Native health behavior: findings from the behavioral risk factor surveillance system, 1992-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3490
Source
Ethn Dis. 1999;9(3):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
C H Denny
T L Taylor
Author Affiliation
Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3717, USA. cfd3@cdc.gov
Source
Ethn Dis. 1999;9(3):403-9
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Risk-Taking
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences between American Indian and white adults in behavioral risk factors for chronic disease and injury. METHODS: Data were drawn from the 1992-1995 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, an ongoing telephone survey of health behaviors of adults. Prevalence estimates by sex were calculated for American Indian and white respondents in 15 states and the significance of their differences evaluated by chi-square tests. RESULTS: American Indians were found to be at significantly higher risk than whites for fair to poor general health status, medical cost difficulties, binge drinking, cigarette smoking, not always using safety belts, being diagnosed as diabetic, and obesity. CONCLUSIONS: To reduce the gap in behavioral risk factors between American Indians and whites, more resources need to be dedicated to American Indian health. Note. The term "American Indian" henceforth refers to those who identify themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native.
PubMed ID
10600063 View in PubMed
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Analysing the effect of area of residence over the life course in multilevel epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139188
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Nov;38(5 Suppl):119-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Oyvind Naess
Alastair H Leyland
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. oena@fhi.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Nov;38(5 Suppl):119-26
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Causality
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Statistical
Mortality
Multilevel Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In this paper we present multilevel models of individuals' residential history at multiple time points through the life course and their application and discuss some advantages and disadvantages for their use in epidemiological studies.
Literature review of research using longitudinal multilevel models in studies of neighbourhood effects, statistical multilevel models that take individuals' residential history into account, and the application of these models in the Oslo mortality study.
Measures of variance have been used to investigate the contextual impact of membership to collectives, such as area of residence, at several time points. The few longitudinal multilevel models that have been used suggest that early life area of residence may have an effect on mortality independently of residence later in life although the proportion of variation attributable to area level is small compared to individual level. The following multilevel models have been developed: simple multilevel models for each year separately, a multiple membership model, a cross-classified model, and finally a correlated cross-classified model. These models have different assumptions regarding the timing of influence through the life course.
To fully recognise the origin of adult chronic diseases, factors at all stages of the life course at both individual and area level needs to be considered in order to avoid biased estimates. Important challenges in making life course residential data available for research and assessing how changing administrative coding over time reflect contextual impact need to be overcome before these models can be implemented as normal practice in multilevel epidemiology.
PubMed ID
21062846 View in PubMed
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438 records – page 1 of 44.