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Cause-specific mortality in Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel production workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285596
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2016 Apr;66(3):241-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
M. Huvinen
E. Pukkala
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2016 Apr;66(3):241-6
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Chromium Alloys - adverse effects
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Metallurgy
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Respiration Disorders - chemically induced - mortality
Risk factors
Stainless Steel - adverse effects
Wounds and Injuries - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Although stainless steel has been produced for more than a hundred years, exposure-related mortality data for production workers are limited.
To describe cause-specific mortality in Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel workers.
We studied Finnish stainless steel production chain workers employed between 1967 and 2004, from chromite mining to cold rolling of stainless steel, divided into sub-cohorts by production units with specific exposure patterns. We obtained causes of death for the years 1971-2012 from Statistics Finland. We calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) as ratios of observed and expected numbers of deaths based on population mortality rates of the same region.
Among 8088 workers studied, overall mortality was significantly decreased (SMR 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-0.84), largely due to low mortality from diseases of the circulatory system (SMR 0.71; 95% CI 0.61-0.81). In chromite mine, stainless steel melting shop and metallurgical laboratory workers, the SMR for circulatory disease was below 0.4 (SMR 0.33; 95% CI 0.07-0.95, SMR 0.22; 95% CI 0.05-0.65 and SMR 0.16; 95% CI 0.00-0.90, respectively). Mortality from accidents (SMR 0.84; 95% CI 0.67-1.04) and suicides (SMR 0.72; 95% CI 0.56-0.91) was also lower than in the reference population.
Working in the Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel industry appears not to be associated with increased mortality.
Notes
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Comment In: Arch Environ Occup Health. 2016 Jul 3;71(4):187-827230506
PubMed ID
26655692 View in PubMed
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[Effect of industrial and working conditions on health status of workers in ferrochrome self-separating slag plant].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227460
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(2):13-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A K Zaslavskii
B T Velichkovskii
E I Likhacheva
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(2):13-6
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Chromium - adverse effects
Chromium Alloys - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Occupational - chemically induced
Dust - adverse effects
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Iron - adverse effects
Metallurgy
Pneumoconiosis - etiology
Russia
Abstract
The article contains a hygienic assessment of the USSR developed technological processes for ferrochromium slag self-separating. It was established that the major hazardous factor in the environmental conditions was the high-grade chromium-containing slag aerosol influencing most unfavourably the workers' health state, thus causing high-level morbidity with temporary disability. Preventive screening would predominantly reveal chronic bronchitis and allergic dermatoses with a less prevalence of pneumoconiosis. The forms of occupational toxic dust bronchitis characteristic of this particular group exhibited some clinical and functional peculiarities caused by a complex action of chromium and alkali.
PubMed ID
1829052 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposure to cobalt chromium dust and lung disorders in dental technicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67702
Source
Thorax. 1995 Jul;50(7):769-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
A I Seldén
B. Persson
S I Bornberger-Dankvardt
L E Winström
L S Bodin
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Thorax. 1995 Jul;50(7):769-72
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chromium Alloys - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Technicians
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pneumoconiosis - epidemiology - etiology
Quartz - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND--Dental technician's pneumoconiosis is a dust-induced fibrotic lung disease of fairly recent origin. This study was carried out to estimate its occurrence in Sweden. METHODS--Thirty seven dental technicians in central and south eastern Sweden with at least five years of exposure to dust from cobalt chromium molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, identified by postal survey, agreed to undergo chest radiography and assessment of lung function and exposure to inorganic dust. RESULTS--Six subjects (16%; 95% confidence interval 6% to 23%) showed radiological evidence of dental technician's pneumoconiosis. The lung function of the study group was reduced compared with historical reference material. With local exhaust ventilation dust levels were generally low, whereas in dental laboratories without such equipment high levels of dust, particularly cobalt, were found. CONCLUSIONS--Pneumoconiosis may result from exposure to inorganic dust in the manufacturing of CoCrMo-based dental constructions. It is possible to reduce this hazard substantially by local exhaust ventilation.
PubMed ID
7570413 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health-related quality of life and symptoms in patients with experiences of health problems related to dental restorative materials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120849
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2013 Apr;41(2):163-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Aron Naimi-Akbar
Pia Svedberg
Kristina Alexanderson
Bodil Carlstedt-Duke
Jan Ekstrand
Gunilla Sandborgh Englund
Author Affiliation
Division of Dental Biomaterials and Cariology, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. aron.naimi-akbar@ki.se
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2013 Apr;41(2):163-72
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylic Resins - adverse effects
Aged
Attitude to Health
Ceramics - adverse effects
Chromium Alloys - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Composite Resins - adverse effects
Dental Alloys - adverse effects
Dental Amalgam - adverse effects
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dental Restoration, Permanent - adverse effects
Fatigue - etiology
Female
Gold Alloys - adverse effects
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Weakness - etiology
Musculoskeletal Pain - etiology
Quality of Life
Sleep Disorders - etiology
Sweden
Titanium - adverse effects
Toothache - etiology
Xerostomia - etiology
Abstract
The question of health risks associated with dental materials, especially dental amalgam, has long been controversial and remains unresolved. For the past 10 years, people in Sweden with perceived adverse reactions to dental restorative materials have been entitled to apply to their local county council for subsidized replacement of restorative materials. The aim of the study was to investigate symptoms, perceived health changes over time and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in this population, comprising subjects with subjective health impairment, allegedly because of dental materials. A further aim was to compare their HRQoL with that of the general population.
A comprehensive questionnaire was sent to 515 people who had applied for subsidized replacement of dental restorations. The questionnaire covered general and oral symptoms, HRQoL, health ratings over time and dental restoration replacement.
The response rate was 54.4% (n=280). Most (83.2%) answered that they had undergone replacement of restorative materials because of impaired health, perceived to be related to dental restorative materials. The most common symptoms were musculoskeletal pain (67.5%), sleep disturbance (60.0%) and fatigue (58.6%). The HRQoL of the study subjects was significantly lower than that of the Swedish population in general.
Subjects who had undergone subsidized dental restoration replacement reported persistent subjective symptoms and low HRQoL. The results indicate that replacement of restorative materials alone is insufficient to achieve improved health in patients with symptoms allegedly attributable to dental restorations.
Notes
Comment In: J Evid Based Dent Pract. 2013 Dec;13(4):165-724237741
PubMed ID
22963525 View in PubMed
Less detail