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2,3-Butanediol in plasma from an alcoholic mistakenly identified as ethylene glycol by gas-chromatographic analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12006
Source
Clin Chem. 1991 Aug;37(8):1453-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
A W Jones
L. Nilsson
S A Gladh
K. Karlsson
J. Beck-Friis
Author Affiliation
Department of Alcohol Toxicology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Clin Chem. 1991 Aug;37(8):1453-5
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - blood
Butylene Glycols - blood - pharmacokinetics
Chromatography, Gas
Diagnostic Errors
Ethylene Glycol
Ethylene Glycols - blood - poisoning
Flame Ionization
Humans
Male
Abstract
2,3-Butanediol was mistakenly identified as ethylene glycol in plasma specimens from two alcoholic patients. The cyclic phenylboronate ester derivatives of 2,3-butanediol and ethylene glycol had the same retention time when OV-17 was used as the stationary phase for gas chromatography. This led to incorrect diagnosis of ethylene glycol poisoning and unnecessary invasive therapy. Plasma from two chronic alcoholics contained 2,3-butanediol at 3.5 and 3.4 mmol/L. The elimination half-life of 2,3-butanediol was 3.9 days when ethanol was administered during therapy for suspected ethylene glycol poisoning. Low concentrations of 2,3-butanediol might be present in blood of chronic alcoholics as a result of a novel pathway of intermediary metabolism associated with some forms of alcoholism. However, a more likely explanation for fairly high concentrations of 2,3-butanediol is enzymatic production from 2-butanone. This ketone occurs in denatured alcohol preparations often consumed by alcoholics in Sweden.
PubMed ID
1868611 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acetaldehyde production and metabolism by human indigenous and probiotic Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196507
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2000 Nov-Dec;35(6):561-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Nosova
H. Jousimies-Somer
K. Jokelainen
R. Heine
M. Salaspuro
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Alcohol Diseases, University Central Hospital of Helsinki and Anaerobe Reference Laboratory, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2000 Nov-Dec;35(6):561-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaldehyde - metabolism
Alcohol Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Bifidobacterium - enzymology - metabolism
Chromatography, Gas
Ethanol - pharmacology
Humans
Lactobacillus - enzymology - metabolism
Abstract
Many human gastrointestinal facultative anaerobic and aerobic bacteria possess alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and are therefore capable of oxidizing ethanol to acetaldehyde. We examined whether human gastrointestinal lactobacilli (three strains), bifidobacteria (five strains) and probiotic Lactobacillus GG ATCC 53103 are also able to metabolize ethanol and acetaldehyde in vitro. Acetaldehyde production by bacterial suspensions was determined by gas chromatography after a 1-h incubation with 22 mM ethanol. To determine the acetaldehyde consumption, the suspensions were incubated with 50 microM or 500 microM acetaldehyde as well as with 500 microM acetaldehyde and 22 mM ethanol, i.e. under conditions resembling those in the human colon after alcohol intake. The influence of growth media and bacterial concentration on the ability of lactobacilli to metabolize acetaldehyde and to produce acetate from acetaldehyde were determined. ADH and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Neither measurable ADH nor ALDH activities were found in aerobically grown Lactobacillus GG ATCC 53103 and Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 strains. All the lactobacilli and bifidobacteria strains revealed a very limited capacity to oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde in vitro. Lactobacillus GG ATCC 53103 had the highest acetaldehyde-metabolizing capacity, which increased significantly with increasing bacterial concentrations. This was associated with a marked production of acetate from acetaldehyde. The type of the growth media had no effect on acetaldehyde consumption. Addition of ethanol to the incubation media diminished the acetaldehyde-metabolizing capacity of all strains. However, in the presence of ethanol, Lactobacillus GG ATCC 53103 still demonstrated the highest capacity for acetaldehyde metabolism of all strains. These data suggest a beneficial impact of Lactobacillus GG ATCC 53103 on high gastrointestinal acetaldehyde levels following alcohol intake. The possible clinical implications of this finding remain to be established in in vitro studies.
PubMed ID
11093962 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue content of alpha-linolenic acid and the risk of ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke subtypes: A Danish case-cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297397
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0198927
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Christian Sørensen Bork
Stine Krogh Venø
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Anne Tjønneland
Philip C Calder
Kim Overvad
Erik Berg Schmidt
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0198927
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Chromatography, Gas
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Smoking
Stroke - classification - diagnosis - etiology
Waist Circumference
alpha-Linolenic Acid - analysis
Abstract
The plant-derived omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.
We have investigated associations between the content of ALA in adipose tissue and the risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes.
Incident cases of ischemic stroke among participants enrolled into the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort (n = 57,053) were identified by linkage with the Danish National Patient Register. Subsequently, all potential cases were validated and classified into ischemic stroke subtypes. The fatty acid composition of adipose tissue was determined by gas chromatography in cases and in a randomly drawn sub-cohort (n = 3500). Statistical analyses were performed using weighted Cox regression.
During a median of 13.4 years of follow-up, 1735 cases of total ischemic stroke were identified including 297 cases of large artery atherosclerosis, 772 cases of small-vessel occlusion, 99 cases of cardio-embolism, 91 cases with stroke of other etiology and 476 cases with stroke of undetermined etiology. The median content of ALA in adipose tissue within the sub-cohort was 0.84% (95% central range: 0.53-1.19%). Multivariable analyses showed a U-shaped association between adipose tissue content of ALA and the rate of total ischemic stroke, but this association was not statistically significant (p = 0.172). In analyses of ischemic stroke subtypes, we observed a statistically significant U-shaped association between ALA and the rate of ischemic stroke due to large artery atherosclerosis (p = 0.017), whereas no appreciable association was observed between ALA and the rate of small-vessel occlusion (p = 0.427). A positive but statistically non-significant association was observed between ALA and the rate of ischemic stroke due to cardio-embolism (p = 0.162).
The content of ALA in adipose tissue was statistically non-significantly U-shaped associated with risk of total ischemic stroke. For ischemic stroke subtypes a statistically significant, U-shaped association with large artery atherosclerosis was observed.
PubMed ID
29889889 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98176
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
D. Iggman
J. Arnlöv
B. Vessby
T. Cederholm
P. Sjögren
U. Risérus
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Chromatography, Gas
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Docosahexaenoic Acids - analysis
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Glucose Clamp Technique
Health Surveys
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Palmitic Acid - analysis
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Dietary fatty acids may affect insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition partly reflects long-term dietary intake, but data from large studies regarding relationships with insulin sensitivity are lacking. We aimed to determine the association between adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly Swedish men. METHODS: In a cross-sectional analysis of the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 795, mean age 71 years), adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and fatty acid composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was measured directly by a euglycaemic clamp. RESULTS: Palmitic acid (16:0), the major saturated fatty acid (SFA) in the diet and in adipose tissue, was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.14), as were 16:1 n-7 (r = -0.15), 20:3 n-6 (r = -0.31), 20:4 n-6 (r = -0.38), 22:4 n-6 (r = -0.37) and 22:5 n-3 (r = -0.24; p
Notes
RefSource: Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):799-801
PubMed ID
20127308 View in PubMed
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[A gas-chromatographic method of analysis of monochloroacetic acid and its sodium salt in the air, skin washings, protective clothing extracts and urine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227341
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):39-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
E I Fomina
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):39-41
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetates - analysis - urine
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Chemical Industry
Chromatography, Gas - methods
Hand Disinfection
Humans
Occupational Medicine - methods
Protective Clothing
Russia
Skin
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The author sets forth a gas chromatographic technique for the detection of monochloracetic acid (MCAA) and its sodium salts in the air, in skin washings, overalls extracts, and urine. The substances were identified as propyl ether. The analysis was performed on a chromatograph supplied with a plasma-ionizing detector on a 2 m-long glass column, with the chromatrone N-AW-DMCS. The detection capacity in the sample was 0.005 microgram/microliter, in the air for MCAA - 0.5 mg/m3, for MCAA sodium salt - 0.25 mg/m3. Standard deviation did not exceed 0.16. The technique was tested in industrial conditions.
PubMed ID
1840108 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol content in declared non-to low alcoholic beverages: implications to pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146266
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2010;17(1):e47-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Y Ingrid Goh
Zulfikar Verjee
Gideon Koren
Author Affiliation
Motherisk Program, Division of Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2010;17(1):e47-50
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - analysis
Beer - analysis
Beverages - analysis
Canada
Chromatography, Gas
Ethanol - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Food Labeling
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Wine - analysis
Abstract
Alcohol consumption in pregnancy may result in serious adverse fetal outcome. Non- or low alcoholic wines and beers may be a risk-reduction strategy to help alcohol-dependent individuals to prevent or limit ethanol consumption. The objective of this study was to quantify ethanol concentrations in Canadian beverages claiming to contain no or low alcohol content.
Forty-five different beverages claiming to contain no or low alcohol content in the Canadian market were tested for ethanol concentration using gas chromatography.
Thirteen (29%) of the beverages contained ethanol levels higher than the declared concentration on their label. Six beverages claiming to contain no alcohol were found to contain greater than 1% ethanol.
Pregnant women seeking replacement to alcoholic beverages may be misled by these labels, unknowingly exposing themselves and their unborn babies to ethanol.
PubMed ID
20051610 View in PubMed
Less detail

Altered states of consciousness: review of experimental data obtained with a multiple techniques approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190226
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2002 Apr;8(2):153-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Pavel V Bundzen
Konstantin G Korotkov
Lars-Erick Unestahl
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Physical Culture, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2002 Apr;8(2):153-65
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect - physiology
Case-Control Studies
Chromatography, Gas
Consciousness Disorders
Electroencephalography
Electromagnetic fields
Evoked Potentials
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Processes - physiology
Models, Psychological
Research Design - standards
Russia
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate the psychophysiologic mechanisms of an altered state of consciousness (ASC) produced via systematic mental training by correlating the results of multiple computerized bioelectrographic measurements.
All subjects were tested, using a set of modern computerized techniques comprising digital electroencephalography, measurement of the low-frequency bilateral activity of the brain, evoked bioelectrographic signals measured by computerized Kirlian photography (otherwise called gas discharge visualization [GDV]), self-reporting by subjects, linguistic testing, and profiling of mood states.
Sweden and Russia from 1996 to 1999.
Young volunteers (61) who underwent systematic mental training for not less than 7 weeks. Members of the control group (56) were not engaged in mental training.
All participants involved in the systematic mental training showed significant positive changes in their psychoemotional status after 7 weeks of mental training. All of the techniques showed specific changes that might be associated with an ASC in the subjects. The Kirlian (GDV) patterns showed a form of "explosive activation," which was stable, reproducible, and correlated with an ASC. This led the authors to introduce the concept of short-term activation of the induced bioelectrographic processes and enabled the properties of this ACS to be determined for the first time. There were practically no changes in the control group.
ASC activation took place with harmonization of the biopotential field of the brain, the psychic state, and the bioenergy fields. This is attributed to changes in both the psychosomatic and psychoenergetic autoregulation. This conclusion is of vital importance for understanding what happens in systematic mental training and understanding the fundamentals of bioenergetic and psychosomatic medicine.
PubMed ID
12006123 View in PubMed
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The amino acids used in reproduction by butterflies: a comparative study of dietary sources using compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76295
Source
Physiol Biochem Zool. 2005 Sep-Oct;78(5):819-27
Publication Type
Article
Author
Diane M O'Brien
Carol L Boggs
Marilyn L Fogel
Author Affiliation
Institute of Arctic Biology, P.O. Box 757000, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK, 99775-7000, USA. ffdo@uaf.edu
Source
Physiol Biochem Zool. 2005 Sep-Oct;78(5):819-27
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acids - metabolism
Analysis of Variance
Animal Nutrition
Animals
Butterflies - metabolism - physiology
Carbon Isotopes - metabolism
Chromatography, Gas
Comparative Study
Diet
Isotope Labeling - methods
Plants - chemistry
Reproduction - physiology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Species Specificity
Abstract
It is a nutritional challenge for nectar-feeding insects to meet the amino acid requirements of oviposition. Here we investigate whether egg amino acids derive from larval diet or are synthesized from nectar sugar in four species of butterfly: Colias eurytheme, Speyeria mormonia, Euphydryas chalcedona, and Heliconius charitonia. These species exhibit a range of life history and differ in degree of shared phylogeny. We use 13C differences among plants to identify dietary sources of amino acid carbon, and we measure amino acid 13C using compound-specific stable isotope analysis. Egg essential amino acids derived solely from the larval diet, with no evidence for metabolic carbon remodeling. Carbon in nonessential amino acids from eggs derived primarily from nectar sugars, with consistent variation in amino acid turnover. There was no relationship between the nonessential amino acids of eggs and host plants, demonstrating extensive metabolic remodeling. Differences between species in carbon turnover were reflected at the molecular level, particularly by glutamate and aspartate. Essential amino acid 13C varied in a highly consistent pattern among larval host plants, reflecting a common isotopic "fingerprint" associated with plant biosynthesis. These data demonstrate conservative patterns of amino acid metabolism among Lepidoptera and the power of molecular stable isotope analyses for evaluating nutrient metabolism in situ.
PubMed ID
16096984 View in PubMed
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[An attempt to measure objectively the quality of air in schoolrooms].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110278
Source
Nord Hyg Tidskr. 1969;50(1):24-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969

184 records – page 1 of 19.