Skip header and navigation

Refine By

154 records – page 1 of 16.

"A different atmosphere of love": a qualitative study of the experiences of participants in Evangelical substance user rehabilitation programs in the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115826
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2013 Apr;48(6):421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Kenneth M Stoltzfus
David Cecil
Author Affiliation
Social Sciences Department, LCC International University, Klaipeda, Lithuania. kstoltzfus@lcc.lt
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2013 Apr;48(6):421-8
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Christianity
Drug Users - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Qualitative Research
Russia
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
This article explores the lived experiences of individuals who have participated in faith-based substance user rehabilitation programs in the Russian Federation. The Russian Federation has high rates of alcohol and opioid dependence and a dearth of professional treatment options. In the post-Soviet period, Evangelical Christian groups have developed substance user rehabilitation programs to attempt to address substance use and its related problems. Data were collected during 2010 via focus group interviews with participants in three Evangelical rehabilitation programs in the Volga region of the Russian Federation. Themes emerging from the qualitative data analysis process were classified into three broad categories: Typical Day, Personal Background/Decision to Enter Rehabilitation, and Helpful Aspects of Rehabilitation Process.
Notes
Erratum In: Subst Use Misuse. 2013 Sep;48(12):1218
PubMed ID
23461666 View in PubMed
Less detail

[After years in nursing Mona has found "her home"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236449
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Oct 9;10(18):30-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-1986
Author
M. Mellert
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Oct 9;10(18):30-2
Date
Oct-9-1986
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Christianity
Humans
Long-Term Care
Nursing Care
Philosophy, Nursing
Sweden
PubMed ID
3099495 View in PubMed
Less detail

The age pattern of fecundability: an analysis of French Canadian and Hutterite birth histories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193504
Source
Soc Biol. 2000 Spring-Summer;47(1-2):34-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
U. Larsen
S. Yan
Author Affiliation
Department of Population and International Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Soc Biol. 2000 Spring-Summer;47(1-2):34-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Amenorrhea - history
Birth Intervals
Birth rate
Canada - epidemiology
Christianity - history
Emigration and Immigration - history
Female
Fertility
France - ethnology
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, Ancient
Humans
Infertility - ethnology - history
Linear Models
Marriage - history
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper analyzes the age pattern of effective fecundability from populations with no evidence of deliberate fertility control using a new convolution model of fecundability. The analysis is based on a sample of Hutterite birth histories from the mid-20th century, and birth histories of French Canadians from the 17th and 18th centuries. The main findings are as follows: 1) the level of effective fecundability is higher among the French Canadians compared to the Hutterites; 2) effective fecundability peaks at age 20 for the Hutterites, and in the early to mid-20s for the French Canadians; 3) Hutterite effective fecundability declines almost linearly from age 20 to 45, and French Canadian effective fecundability declines slowly from its peak to the early 30s, and more rapidly at older ages; and 4) the duration of postpartum amenorrhea is longer for the French Canadians than for the Hutterites. Because of the shorter periods of postpartum amenorrhea the Hutterites have about the same average number of children as the French Canadians, even though the French Canadians have higher effective fecundability.
PubMed ID
11521455 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibodies to adenovirus and to psittacosis in eastern arctic Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1125
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 49:230-231.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1958
Author
Hildes, J.A.
Wilt, J.C.
Stanfield, F.J.
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 49:230-231.
Date
1958
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Frobisher Bay
Arctic Bay
Grise Fiord
Pond Inlet
Scott Inlet
Clyde River
Kivitoo
Broughton Island
Padloping
Durban Island
Lake Harbour
Cape Christian
Wakeham Bay
Adenovirus
Psittacosis
Zoonosis
Antibodies
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1979.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 876.
PubMed ID
13561195 View in PubMed
Less detail

The applicability of the Antonovsky Sense of Coherence Scale to a group of Pentecostalists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71635
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(2):190-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A. Langius
H. Björvell
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Nursing Research, Karolinska Hospital, Department of Nursing, Borgmästarvillan, Karolinska Institutet, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. ann.langius@medks.ki.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(2):190-2
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Christianity
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sweden
Abstract
A methodological issue concerning the Antonovsky of Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale was raised in an earlier study questioning the applicability of the scale in different populations, and among these the Pentecostalists. The question was raised when a group of Pentecostalists had had difficulties in filling in another scale intended to measure the SOC. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the applicability of the 29-item Antonovsky SOC scale in a group of people (n = 37) belonging to a church of the Pentecostal Movement and to compare the results with those of a randomized group (n = 145) from a general population. The Pentecostalists filled in the scale with no obvious difficulties. No significant differences were found between the Pentecostal group and the group of a general population regarding the total SOC scale scores (mean 152, SD 16 and mean 151, SD 18, respectively). The applicability difficulties found in the earlier study, however using an other SOC scale, could not be confirmed in the present study. To conclude, the Antonovsky SOC scale has so far not shown to have applicability weakness.
PubMed ID
12078633 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Sep 26;150(39):2356-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-26-1988
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Sep 26;150(39):2356-7
Date
Sep-26-1988
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - transmission
Blood Donors
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Christianity
Denmark
Humans
PubMed ID
3206613 View in PubMed
Less detail

"Around here, they roll up the sidewalks at night": a qualitative study of youth living in a rural Canadian community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164587
Source
Health Place. 2007 Dec;13(4):826-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Jean Shoveller
Joy Johnson
Ken Prkachin
David Patrick
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, 5804 Fairview Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. jean.shoveller@ubc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2007 Dec;13(4):826-38
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
British Columbia
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Christianity
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Residence Characteristics
Rural Population
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Social Environment
Abstract
The paper is based on an ethnographic study conducted in a rural community in British Columbia, Canada. The study examined the impact of community culture on youth's development as sexual beings. We describe how social and geographical forces intersect to affect youth's lives and trace the ways in which deprivation of various forms of capital as well as social practices contribute to some youth being located in undesirable social positions. Our findings illustrate how the effects of stigmatisation, self-segregation, and other forms of symbolic violence can extend beyond health impacts and into the broader social realm.
PubMed ID
17368073 View in PubMed
Less detail

Being a woman: perspectives of low-german-speaking mennonite women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152302
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Apr;30(4):324-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Judith C Kulig
Ruth Babcock
Margaret Wall
Shirley Hill
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. Kulig@uleth.ca
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Apr;30(4):324-38
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Christianity
Contraception Behavior - ethnology
Cultural Competency
Female
Germany - ethnology
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
Understanding the beliefs and knowledge related to women's sexuality is important when working with unique religious groups in order to provide culturally appropriate care. An exploratory, descriptive qualitative study generated knowledge, beliefs, and practices related to menstruation, ovulation, and family planning among Low German-speaking (LGS) Mennonite women (n = 38). There is a pervasive silence that surrounds sexuality among this group, who have a limited understanding of the physiological changes they experience. Honoring religious principles and family and community expectations through acceptable female behavior is essential. Adherence to religious principles varies by family but is not shared with the group to avoid disfavor.
PubMed ID
19255886 View in PubMed
Less detail

Better planning could have saved life of woman who refused transfusion, MD says.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221071
Source
CMAJ. 1993 May 1;148(9):1596-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1993

154 records – page 1 of 16.