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A 1-year randomized study to evaluate the effects of a dose reduction in oral contraceptives on lipids and carbohydrate metabolism: 20 microg ethinyl estradiol combined with 100 microg levonorgestrel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176202
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Sven O Skouby
Jan Endrikat
Bernd Düsterberg
Werner Schmidt
Christoph Gerlinger
Jens Wessel
Henri Goldstein
Joergen Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, DK 2000 Copenhagen F, Denmark. sven.skouby@fh.hosp.dk
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
C-Peptide - blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism - drug effects
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Contraceptive Agents, Female - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethinyl Estradiol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Levonorgestrel - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
To evaluate the impact on lipid and carbohydrate variables of a combined one-third ethinyl estradiol (EE)/levonorgestrel (LNG) dose reduction in oral contraceptives.
In an open-label, randomized study, a dose-reduced oral contraceptive containing 20 microg EE and 100 microg LNG (20 EE/100 LNG) was compared with a reference preparation containing 30 microg EE and 150 microg LNG (30 EE/150 LNG). One-year data from 48 volunteers were obtained.
We found a decrease of HDL2 cholesterol and increases of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total triglycerides in both treatment groups from baseline to the 13th treatment cycle. Although for four of six variables, the changes in the 20 EE group were lower compared with the 30 EE group, none of the differences between the two treatments were statistically significant. The median values for the fasting levels of insulin, C-peptide and free fatty acids slightly increased or remained unchanged while the fasting glucose levels slightly decreased after 13 treatment cycles. While the glucose area under the curve (AUC) (0-3 h) was similar in both groups during the OGTT, the insulin AUC(0-3 h) was less increased in the 20 EE/100 LNG group compared with the 30 EE/150 LNG group. None of the differences between the treatment groups for any of the carbohydrate metabolism variables were statistically significant at any time point. Both study treatments were safe and well tolerated by the volunteers.
Similar effects on the lipid and carbohydrate profiles were found for both preparations. The balanced one-third EE dose reduction in this new oral contraceptive caused slightly lower, but insignificant, changes in the lipid and carbohydrate variables compared with the reference treatment.
PubMed ID
15707560 View in PubMed
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The 21-year follow-up of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study: risk factor levels, secular trends and east-west difference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180902
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Apr;255(4):457-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
M. Juonala
J S A Viikari
N. Hutri-Kähönen
M. Pietikäinen
E. Jokinen
L. Taittonen
J. Marniemi
T. Rönnemaa
O T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
The Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Apr;255(4):457-68
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study is an on-going multicentre study of atherosclerosis precursors in Finnish children and young adults. We have collected risk factor data in the 21-year follow-up performed in 2001. The aims of this analysis were to examine the levels, secular trends and east-west difference in risk factors amongst young adults.
Population based follow-up study.
A total of 2283 participants aged 24-39 years in 2001 (63.5% of the original cohort).
Levels of serum lipids, apolipoproteins, blood pressure and smoking.
The mean serum total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in 24-39-year-old adults were 5.16, 3.27, 1.29 and 1.34 mmol L(-1), respectively. Total cholesterol (5.21 vs. 5.12 mmol L(-1), P = 0.046), HDL cholesterol (1.31 vs. 1.28 mmol L(-1), P = 0.027), systolic blood pressure (118 vs. 115 mmHg, P
PubMed ID
15049880 View in PubMed
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The 2003 Canadian recommendations for dyslipidemia management: revisions are needed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175311
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2005
Author
Douglas G Manuel
Peter Tanuseputro
Cameron A Mustard
Susan E Schultz
Geoffrey M Anderson
Sten Ardal
David A Alter
Andreas Laupacis
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ont. doug.manuel@ices.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-31
Date
Apr-12-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Expenditures
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hyperlipidemias - drug therapy
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk factors
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Nov 8;173(10):1210; author reply 121016275979
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Nov 8;173(10):1207; author reply 121016275976
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1033-4; discussion 103715824410
Erratum In: CMAJ. 2005 Jul 19;173(2):133
PubMed ID
15824409 View in PubMed
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Achievement of the Targets of the 20-Year Infancy-Onset Dietary Intervention-Association with Metabolic Profile from Childhood to Adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312184
Source
Nutrients. 2021 Feb 06; 13(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Feb-06-2021
Author
Miia Lehtovirta
Laurie A Matthews
Tomi T Laitinen
Joel Nuotio
Harri Niinikoski
Suvi P Rovio
Hanna Lagström
Jorma S A Viikari
Tapani Rönnemaa
Antti Jula
Mika Ala-Korpela
Olli T Raitakari
Katja Pahkala
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland.
Source
Nutrients. 2021 Feb 06; 13(2):
Date
Feb-06-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Biomarkers - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Cholesterol, Dietary - analysis
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Diet Records
Diet, Healthy - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats - analysis
Dietary Fiber - analysis
Eating - physiology
Energy intake
Fatty Acids - blood
Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - blood
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - blood
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Finland
Fruit
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Heart Disease Risk Factors
Humans
Infant
Lipids - blood
Male
Metabolomics
Nutrition Policy
Prospective Studies
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Young Adult
Abstract
The Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP) is a prospective infancy-onset randomized dietary intervention trial targeting dietary fat quality and cholesterol intake, and favoring consumption of vegetables, fruit, and whole-grains. Diet (food records) and circulating metabolites were studied at six time points between the ages of 9-19 years (n = 549-338). Dietary targets for this study were defined as (1) the ratio of saturated fat (SAFA) to monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA + PUFA)
PubMed ID
33562015 View in PubMed
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Achieving cholesterol targets by individualizing starting doses of statin according to baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary artery disease risk category: the CANadians Achieve Cholesterol Targets Fast with Atorvastatin Stratified Titration (CanACTFAST) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145456
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Feb;26(2):80-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Ehud Ur
Anatoly Langer
Simon W Rabkin
Cristina-Dana Calciu
Lawrence A Leiter
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Feb;26(2):80-6
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cholesterol, LDL - blood - drug effects
Coronary Artery Disease - blood - etiology - prevention & control
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heptanoic Acids - administration & dosage
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Hypercholesterolemia - blood - complications - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Pyrroles - administration & dosage
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Despite an increasing body of evidence on the benefit of lowering elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), there is still considerable concern that patients are not achieving target LDL-C levels.
The CANadians Achieve Cholesterol Targets Fast with Atorvastatin Stratified Titration (CanACTFAST) trial tested whether an algorithm-based statin dosing approach would enable patients to achieve LDL-C and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio targets quickly.
Subjects requiring statin therapy, but with an LDL-C level of 5.7 mmol/L or lower, and triglycerides of 6.8 mmol/L or lower at screening participated in the 12-week study, which had two open-label, six-week phases: a treatment period during which patients received 10 mg, 20 mg, 40 mg or 80 mg of atorvastatin based on an algorithm incorporating baseline LDL-C value and cardiovascular risk; and patients who achieved both LDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratio targets at six weeks continued on the same atorvastatin dose. Patients who did not achieve both targets received dose uptitration using a single-step titration regimen. The primary efficacy outcome was the proportion of patients achieving target LDL-C levels after 12 weeks.
Of 2016 subjects screened at 88 Canadian sites, 1258 were assigned to a study drug (1101 were statin-free and 157 were statin-treated at baseline). The proportion of subjects who achieved LDL-C targets after 12 weeks of treatment was 86% (95% CI 84% to 88%) for statin-free patients and 54% (95% CI 46% to 61%) for statin-treated patients. Overall, 1003 subjects (80%; 95% CI 78% to 82%) achieved both lipid targets.
Algorithm-based statin dosing enables patients to achieve LDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratio targets quickly, with either no titration or a single titration.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 May 16;162(10):1441-710834048
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2007 Mar;191(1):135-4616643923
Cites: JAMA. 2001 May 16;285(19):2486-9711368702
Cites: Am Heart J. 2001 Jun;141(6):949-5611376309
Cites: Am J Med. 2001 Aug 15;111(3):185-9111530028
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Jul 24-31;288(4):462-712132976
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2003 Jul 1;92(1):79-8112842255
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 Oct 28;169(9):921-414581310
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Mar 3;291(9):1071-8014996776
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Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2000 Oct;152(2):489-9610998478
PubMed ID
20151053 View in PubMed
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Acquired liver fat is a key determinant of serum lipid alterations in healthy monozygotic twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113714
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Sep;21(9):1815-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
S M Kaye
M. Maranghi
L H Bogl
J. Kaprio
A. Hakkarainen
J. Lundbom
N. Lundbom
A. Rissanen
M R Taskinen
K H Pietiläinen
Author Affiliation
Obesity Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Sep;21(9):1815-22
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat
Adult
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Exercise
Fatty Liver - blood - complications - genetics - metabolism
Female
Finland
Humans
Liver - metabolism
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - blood - complications - genetics - metabolism
Subcutaneous Fat
Twins, Monozygotic
Young Adult
Abstract
The effects of acquired obesity on lipid profile and lipoprotein composition in rare BMI-discordant monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs were studied.
Abdominal fat distribution, liver fat (magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy), fasting serum lipid profile (ultracentrifugation, gradient gel-electrophoresis, and colorimetric enzymatic methods), and lifestyle factors (questionnaires and diaries) were assessed in 15 BMI-discordant (within-pair difference [?] in BMI >3 kg/m2) and nin concordant (?BMI
PubMed ID
23696329 View in PubMed
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Age and gender specific serum lipid and apolipoprotein fractiles of Finnish children and young adults. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217631
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Aug;83(8):838-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
K V Porkka
J S Viikari
T. Rönnemaa
J. Marniemi
H K Akerblom
Author Affiliation
Third Department of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Aug;83(8):838-48
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Apolipoproteins - blood
Child
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Puberty
Reference Values
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
We present fractile data on serum lipids and apolipoproteins A-l and B for children and young adults from the cardiovascular risk in young Finns study cohort of 1986. The sample comprised 2370 fasting children and young adults (1114 males and 1256 females) aged 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 years. The determinations were performed in duplicate with standard methods. LDL-cholesterol values were calculated. The limits for clearly pathological values (exceeding the 97.5th percentile) irrespective of age and gender were 7.5 mmol/l, 5.0 mmol/l, 3.5 mmol/l and 1.4 g/l for serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoprotein B, respectively. Corresponding values (below the 2.5th percentile) for HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein A-l, HDL2- and HDL3-cholesterol were 0.80 mmol/l, 1.0 mg/l, 0.20 mmol/l and 0.70 mmol/l, respectively. Approximately 79%, 33% and 7% of males had serum total cholesterol values greater than 4.0 mmol, 5.0 mmol/l and 6.0 mmol/l, respectively. Corresponding percentages for females were 87%, 43% and 10%. However, age-related differences were marked. The prevalence of values, e.g. greater than 6 mmol/l according to age, ranged from 6 to 13% in females and from 3 to 12% in males, emphasizing the need for age-specific reference values. Additionally, postpubertal values for total and LDL-cholesterol tended to be slightly lower compared to prepubertal values, indicating that the reference values for adults do not apply to adolescents and young adults. The age-related changes in lipid levels were evident in each fractile and were especially accentuated in higher fractiles. Fluctuations with age were more pronounced in males than in females. These results are intended to be applied as reference values for diagnosing dyslipidemias.
PubMed ID
7981561 View in PubMed
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Age- and sex-specific reference values for non-HDL cholesterol and remnant cholesterol derived from the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302867
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2019 Feb - Apr; 79(1-2):39-42
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Peter Ridefelt
Emil Hagström
Maria K Svensson
Torbjörn Åkerfeldt
Anders Larsson
Author Affiliation
a Department of Medical Sciences , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2019 Feb - Apr; 79(1-2):39-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - diagnosis - prevention & control
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Female
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Non-HDL-cholesterol (non-HDL-C) has been reported to be a better marker of cardiovascular risk than LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) especially in individuals with high triglyceride values. Further, levels of remnant cholesterol have been suggested to in part explain residual risk not captured with LDL-C. The aim of the present study was to define reference values for non-HDL-C and remnant cholesterol based on data from the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP).
We analyzed the test results for total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides from 1392 healthy females and 1236 healthy males. Non-HDL-C was calculated as measured total cholesterol minus measured HDL-cholesterol. Remnant cholesterol was calculated using the Friedewald equation for LDL-C: measured total cholesterol minus measured HDL-cholesterol and minus calculated LDL-cholesterol. The 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles for these markers were calculated according to the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry guidelines on the statistical treatment of reference values.
Age (18-
PubMed ID
30638091 View in PubMed
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Aggregation of lipoprotein and inflammatory parameters in families with a history of premature myocardial infarction: the Tallinn myocardial infarction study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154200
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2008;46(11):1602-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Katrin Aasvee
Elvira Kurvinen
Jouko Sundvall
Matti Jauhiainen
Inna Tur
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia. katrin.aasvee@tai.ee
Source
Clin Chem Lab Med. 2008;46(11):1602-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-Phase Proteins - metabolism
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Child
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Family Health
Female
Finland
Humans
Lipoprotein(a) - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The offspring of individuals with a history of premature myocardial infarction are at increased risk of premature coronary attacks. The aim of this study was to determine parent/offspring associations of coronary risk factors in families affected by premature myocardial infarction and to compare these to corresponding control families.
The cohort of cases consisted of 71 male survivors of myocardial infarction and their 128 descendants (aged 7-18 years). As control families, 85 randomly selected healthy males with their 66 descendants were investigated. Besides traditional risk factors, serum high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), apolipoprotein (apo) E phenotypes and lipoprotein(a) were analyzed.
In the offspring of the patients, fibrinogen and atherogenic lipoprotein parameters were higher than in the corresponding controls, but hsCRP, lipoprotein(a) and anthropometric data did not differ between the groups. The adult-offspring positive correlations were detected in fibrinogen and in almost all measured lipoprotein fractions in the affected families; amongst the controls, the association was observed only for triglyceride levels. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated independent association of offspring apoB, apoA-I and fibrinogen levels with a family history of premature myocardial infarction.
The most informative predictors of future coronary attacks during childhood are apoB-100 and apoB/apoA-I ratio; serum hsCRP and lipoprotein(a) do not have predictive value in childhood.
PubMed ID
19012525 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake, myocardial infarction, biochemical risk factors, and alcohol dehydrogenase genotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98530
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2009 Oct;2(5):507-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Janne S Tolstrup
Morten Grønbaek
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol Research, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. jst@niph.dk
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2009 Oct;2(5):507-14
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Dehydrogenase - genetics
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Biological Markers - blood - metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fibrinogen - metabolism
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The risk of myocardial infarction is lower among light-to-moderate alcohol drinkers compared with abstainers. We tested associations between alcohol intake and risk of myocardial infarction and risk factors and whether these associations are modified by variations in alcohol dehydrogenases. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used information on 9584 men and women from the Danish general population in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. During follow-up, from 1991 to 2007, 663 incident cases of myocardial infarction occurred. We observed that increasing alcohol intake was associated with decreasing risk of myocardial infarction, decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and fibrinogen, increasing diastolic and systolic blood pressure and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and with U-shaped nonfasting triglycerides. In contrast, ADH1B and ADH1C genotypes were not associated with risk of myocardial infarction or with any of the cardiovascular biochemical risk factors, and there was no indication that associations between alcohol intake and myocardial infarction and between alcohol intake and risk factors were modified by genotypes. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing alcohol intake is associated with decreasing risk of myocardial infarction, decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and fibrinogen, increasing diastolic and systolic blood pressure and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and U-shaped nonfasting triglycerides. These associations were not modified by ADH1B and ADH1C are genotypes.
PubMed ID
20031627 View in PubMed
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394 records – page 1 of 40.