Skip header and navigation

Refine By

50 records – page 1 of 5.

[Antibiotic resistance and transferable antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from Swedish calves 5 and 30 days old.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13285
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1975 Feb;27(2):77-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1975
Author
M. Wierup
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1975 Feb;27(2):77-84
Date
Feb-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Ampicillin - pharmacology
Animals
Cattle
Chloramphenicol - pharmacology
Escherichia coli - drug effects - isolation & purification
Extrachromosomal Inheritance
Feces - microbiology
Neomycin - pharmacology
Penicillin resistance
Streptomycin - pharmacology
Sulfonamides - pharmacology
Sweden
Tetracycline - pharmacology
Abstract
E. coli strains isolated from 5-day-old and 30-day-old healthy calves were tested for antibiotic resistance and H-factor mediated antibiotic resistance. An average of 1.6 antibiotic-resistant strains and 1.1 strains with transferable antibiotic resistance were isolated from each of the investigated calves. In comparison with the 30-day-old calves, the 5-day-old calves had significantly more strains with transferable antibiotic resistance (95.8 percent as against 63.4 percent). The R+ strains isolated from the younger calves transferred significantly more en bloc (43.5 percent as against 10.0 percent) and double plus multiple resistance (5292 percent as against 24.4 percent) than did those isolated from the older calves. The most common resistance was to sulphonamide and tetracycline and the most common transferred resistance was to sulphonamide.
PubMed ID
1094406 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic resistance of pneumococci in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10876
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 1998 Apr;10(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
T. Bergan
P. Gaustad
E A Høiby
B P Berdal
G. Furuberg
J. Baann
T. Tønjum
Author Affiliation
Kaptein W. Wilhelmsen og Frues, Institute of Medical Microbiology, University of Oslo, Rikshospitaiet, Norway.
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 1998 Apr;10(1):77-81
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Chloramphenicol - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Fluoroquinolones
Humans
Macrolides
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Norway
Penicillin resistance
Penicillins - pharmacology
Serotyping
Streptococcus pneumoniae - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Vancomycin - pharmacology
Abstract
A collection of 178 pneumococcal isolates found in Norway during the period 1987-1994 were tested for their susceptibility to benzylpenicillin, macrolides (azithromycin, clarithromycin, dirithromycin, erythromycin, roxithromycin, spiramycin), fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin), imipenem, chloramphenicol, and vancomycin by a standard agar dilution procedure. To benzylpenicillin, two strains (1%) showed resistance and 14 strains (8%) intermediate susceptibility. Towards erythromycin, eight strains (4%) showed resistance and four strains (2%) intermediate susceptibility. Cross-resistance was demonstrated among the macrolides. Among the fluoroquinolones, intermediate susceptibility occurred with 42% of the isolates for sparfioxacin and 90% for ciprofloxacin; to the latter 5.1% proved resistant. The sum of intermediate and highly resistant isolates was 53% for chloramphenicol. Both penicillin-resistant strains were isolated during the last 2 years of collection and came from patients of non-Norwegian ethnic background. Imported strains appeared over represented among the strains resistant to penicillin and macrolides. Only imipenem and vancomycin showed full susceptibility for all pneumococci tested. An over representation of serogroup 6 strains was apparent among the strains with intermediate susceptibility and high resistance to benzylpenicillin. It is apparent that high-level resistance has, not so far, become a difficult problem in Norway. Nevertheless, the situation requires monitoring of the resistance level, particularly in meningitis and septic patients, and certainly in patients who cntail a higher than usual possibility of acquiring pneumococci from pools of resistant strains outside Norway (visitors, immigrants and recent returness from abroad).
PubMed ID
9624547 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic susceptibility of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from cerebrospinal fluid and blood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12666
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [B]. 1986 Jun;94(3):167-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986
Author
M. Arpi
P Z Hønberg
N. Frimodt-Møller
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [B]. 1986 Jun;94(3):167-71
Date
Jun-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Cefotaxime - pharmacology
Ceftriaxone - pharmacology
Cephalosporins - pharmacology
Cerebrospinal Fluid - microbiology
Chloramphenicol - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Haemophilus Infections - cerebrospinal fluid - microbiology
Haemophilus influenzae - drug effects - enzymology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Netilmicin - pharmacology
Rifampin - pharmacology
Septicemia - microbiology
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis
Abstract
The emergence of ampicillin and chloramphenicol resistant Haemophilus influenzae type b in Denmark has created demands for alternative treatments of serious infections with H. influenzae. In this study 102 strains of H. influenzae recovered from cerebrospinal fluid (85) and blood (17) were tested for susceptibility to ampicillin, piperacillin, erythromycin, rifampicin, chloramphenicol, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, moxalactam, aztreonam, and netilmicin by means of the agar dilution method. The majority (97%) was H. influenzae type b and of these strains 94% belonged to biotype I. Nine of the investigated strains were beta-lactamase producers. Ceftriaxone and cefotaxime were the most active agents (MIC90 less than or equal to 0.025 microliter/ml) followed by moxalactam and aztreonam (MIC90 = 0.1 microgram/ml). Except for ampicillin and piperacillin, the MIC was similar for beta-lactamase producers and non-producers. Several of the investigated antibiotics, especially some of the third generation cephalosporins, might constitute valid therapeutical alternatives to conventional drugs in the treatment of severe H. influenzae infections.
PubMed ID
3488639 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotic susceptibility pattern and capsular types of Haemophilus influenzae recovered from clinical specimens in northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12847
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [B]. 1983 Dec;91(6):383-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
K. Melby
T. Leinslie
N. Hagen
L H Vorland
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [B]. 1983 Dec;91(6):383-7
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - pharmacology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Chloramphenicol - pharmacology
Haemophilus Infections - microbiology
Haemophilus influenzae - classification - drug effects
Humans
Norway
Penicillin G - pharmacology
Penicillin V - pharmacology
Plasmids
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - classification
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sulfisomidine - pharmacology
Sulfonamides - pharmacology
beta-Lactamases - metabolism
Abstract
One hundred and nine strains of Haemophilus influenzae recovered from clinical specimens were examined for antibiotic sensitivity pattern and capsular types. All strains from blood cultures, cerebrospinal fluid and a joint aspirate were type b whereas most of the isolates were acapsular when recovered from other specimens viz. wound secretions (67%), maxillary sinus (75%), lower resp tract (86%), nasal cavity (90%). Out of the 109 strains 88 (81%) were non-typable, and 3.6% were beta-lactamase-producing, two of which were type e, one was type b and one was acapsular. Three beta-lactamase-producing strains were isolated from specimens from the respiratory tract and one from blood cultures. Beta-lactamase-producing strains including one chloramphenicol-resistant strain harboured similar plasmids, as judged by agarose gel electrophoresis. The strains showed quite a uniform sensitivity to antibacterial agents with the exception of sulphonamides to which the capsular strains, particularly type b strains, were less susceptible.
PubMed ID
6424404 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antimicrobial resistance and resistance plasmids in Salmonella from Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249638
Source
Can J Microbiol. 1977 Sep;23(9):1266-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1977
Author
R B Grant
L. Di Mambro
Source
Can J Microbiol. 1977 Sep;23(9):1266-73
Date
Sep-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - pharmacology
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Chloramphenicol - pharmacology
Conjugation, Genetic
Escherichia coli - drug effects - genetics
Humans
Ontario
Penicillin resistance
R Factors
Salmonella - drug effects - genetics
Species Specificity
Temperature
Abstract
Collections of 589 human and 204 animal strains of Salmonella isolated in Ontario during the summer of1974 were examined for susceptibility to 12 antimicrobial agents. Many isolates were found to be resistant to both chloramphenicol (12.4% of the human and 38.2% of the animal sample) and ampicillin. The chloramphenicol resistance almost always occurred in strains which were also resistant to ampicillin and was usually due to a self-transmissible plasmid with a resistance pattern of CmKmSmTc (chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin, and tetracycline) or CmTc. Ampicillin resistance in these strains was mediated by a variety of plasmids with patterns ApSu (ampicillin and sulfa drugs) and ApSmSu, many of which were nonself-transmissible. Ampicillin resistance in chloramphenicol-sensitive strains was transferable from 21% of the strains, and it was associated with resistance patterns which were different from the self-transferable ampicillin patterns from the chloramphenicol-resistance strains.
PubMed ID
332297 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinico-laboratory features of dysentery today, according to material from the Krasnodar City Hospital No. 2].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110169
Source
Boll Soc Ital Biol Sper. 1969 Mar 31;45(6):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-1969

[Comparative studies of the effect of furacillin, levomycetin and biomycin on dysenterial bacilli.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13673
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1960;22:38-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1960

50 records – page 1 of 5.