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129 records – page 1 of 13.

[2 strategies in case of meningitis in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12246
Source
Nord Med. 1990;105(10):261, 265
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Lindberg
Author Affiliation
Infektionskliniken, Länssjukhuset, Halmstad.
Source
Nord Med. 1990;105(10):261, 265
Date
1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ampicillin - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy
Cephalosporins - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Chloramphenicol - therapeutic use
English Abstract
Humans
Infant
Meningitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Abstract
In contrast to the other Nordic countries Sweden has long had a favourable position as regards meningococcal disease. In the last 10 year period the annual incidence has been only about one case per 100,000 inhabitants. The treatment once the cause is confirmed is conventional and no different from that in the other Nordic countries but varies somewhat in the event of unknown etiology. Cortisone therapy also seems to be more frequent in treatment of meningitis. Two strategies for antibiotic prophylaxis are used in Sweden.
PubMed ID
2235471 View in PubMed
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[A case of severely disturbed hematopoiesis in a 15 year old adolescent treated with levomycetin]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13630
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1965 Jul-Aug;4:33-4
Publication Type
Article

Acute conjunctivitis. A comparison of fusidic acid viscous eye drops and chloramphenicol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11748
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1993 Apr;71(2):165-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
I. Hørven
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Oslo University, National Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Norway.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1993 Apr;71(2):165-8
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Chloramphenicol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Conjunctivitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Double-Blind Method
Drug Administration Schedule
Eye Infections, Bacterial - drug therapy
Female
Fusidic Acid - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmic Solutions
Abstract
Fucidic acid viscous eye drops 1% given twice daily was compared with chloramphenicol eye drops 0.5% given 6 times daily in patients with acute conjunctivitis. Patients were recruited from 38 general practitioners in Norway. The mean duration of treatment was 6.6 days for Fucidic acid, 6.2 days for chloramphenicol. There was no major differences between the two groups in the bacteriological findings, and there was no significant difference in response to treatment. The use of fusidic acid in a carbomer vehicle as in Fucithalmic, has proved to give a long-lasting antibiotic concentration in the tear fluid, which allows the preferable twice daily application.
PubMed ID
8333258 View in PubMed
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[Adaptation of Sonne and Flexner dysentery bacteria to antibiotics and some biological properties of adapted subcultures]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13592
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1967 May-Jun;29(3):250-5
Publication Type
Article

Ampicillin-resistant Hemophilus influenzae in Canada: nationwide survey of hospital laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247006
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Jul 21;121(2):198-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-21-1979
Author
D W Scheifele
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Jul 21;121(2):198-202
Date
Jul-21-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - therapeutic use
Canada
Chloramphenicol - therapeutic use
Haemophilus influenzae
Humans
Meningitis, Haemophilus - drug therapy
Penicillin resistance
Retrospective Studies
Notes
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1974 Nov;6(5):620-415825316
Cites: JAMA. 1978 Jan 23;239(4):320-322767
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1978 Jun;7(6):519-23307559
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1978 Sep;138(3):421-4308974
Cites: J Pediatr. 1978 Jun;92(6):889-92307055
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1978 Jul;14(1):154-6308347
Cites: J Pediatr. 1977 Feb;90(2):320-1299774
Cites: J Pediatr. 1977 Feb;90(2):319-20299773
Cites: JAMA. 1978 Jan 23;239(4):324-7244331
Cites: Pediatrics. 1976 Sep;58(3):382-71085435
Cites: Lancet. 1974 Feb 23;1(7852):3134130492
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1976 Sep;130(9):965-708980
Cites: J Pediatr. 1972 Aug;81(2):370-75042500
Cites: Pediatrics. 1976 Sep;58(3):388-911085436
Cites: Pediatrics. 1976 Mar;57(3):4171083008
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1975 AUG 9;113(3):222, 2271079748
PubMed ID
316354 View in PubMed
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[An experimental validation of the use of levomycetin preparations for the treatment of burns infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10610
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 1999 May-Jun;61(3):30-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
V L Tkachenko
A Ia Tsyganenko
N A Liapunov
E P Bezuglaia
V V Minukhin
Author Affiliation
Kharkov State Medical University, Ukraine.
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 1999 May-Jun;61(3):30-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Burns - complications - drug therapy - microbiology
Chloramphenicol - administration & dosage
Comparative Study
Disease Models, Animal
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
English Abstract
Gels
Mice
Mice, Inbred CBA
Ointments
Pseudomonas Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - isolation & purification
Abstract
Application of 1% of chloramphenicol (gel and cream) for local treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn infection has been studied in experiment. In vivo, both medical forms show pronounced therapeutic effect, they promote elimination of P. aeruginosa from wounds and decrease inflammation. In noninfected thermal trauma in laboratory animals application of gel and cream of chloramphenicol reduces transition from the phase of inflammation to the phase of reparation by 3-8 days and prevents infection of the burn wound by conditionally pathogenic microflora.
PubMed ID
10483230 View in PubMed
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An extensive outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella newport. II. Some clinical observations on 488 hospitalized cases and the results of cultures

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13631
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1965 Apr;177:437-444
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1965

[Antibiotic resistance and transferable antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from Swedish calves 5 and 30 days old.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13285
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1975 Feb;27(2):77-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1975
Author
M. Wierup
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1975 Feb;27(2):77-84
Date
Feb-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Ampicillin - pharmacology
Animals
Cattle
Chloramphenicol - pharmacology
Escherichia coli - drug effects - isolation & purification
Extrachromosomal Inheritance
Feces - microbiology
Neomycin - pharmacology
Penicillin resistance
Streptomycin - pharmacology
Sulfonamides - pharmacology
Sweden
Tetracycline - pharmacology
Abstract
E. coli strains isolated from 5-day-old and 30-day-old healthy calves were tested for antibiotic resistance and H-factor mediated antibiotic resistance. An average of 1.6 antibiotic-resistant strains and 1.1 strains with transferable antibiotic resistance were isolated from each of the investigated calves. In comparison with the 30-day-old calves, the 5-day-old calves had significantly more strains with transferable antibiotic resistance (95.8 percent as against 63.4 percent). The R+ strains isolated from the younger calves transferred significantly more en bloc (43.5 percent as against 10.0 percent) and double plus multiple resistance (5292 percent as against 24.4 percent) than did those isolated from the older calves. The most common resistance was to sulphonamide and tetracycline and the most common transferred resistance was to sulphonamide.
PubMed ID
1094406 View in PubMed
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129 records – page 1 of 13.