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2004 Canadian sexually transmitted infections surveillance report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162588
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2007 May;33 Suppl 1:1-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007

Acute pelvic inflammatory disease in outpatients: association with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243976
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1981 Dec;95(6):685-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1981
Author
W R Bowie
H. Jones
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1981 Dec;95(6):685-8
Date
Dec-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Ambulatory Care
British Columbia
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology
Humans
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease - etiology
Abstract
Among 830 women attending a clinic for sexually transmitted disease, Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from 180 (22%) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae from 84 (10%). Retrospective analysis showed that 43 of the women were given outpatient treatment for acute pelvic inflammatory disease because they had low abdominal pain, deep dyspareunia, or unusual vaginal bleeding, or all of these, for less than 2 months in association with cervical motion or adnexal tenderness, or both. None had adnexal masses. C. trachomatis was isolated from 22 and N. gonorrhoeae from 15 of this subgroup of 43 women. This presentation of pelvic inflammatory disease occurred in 10 of the 37 women in the whole study with both C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae, 12 of 143 women with C. trachomatis alone, five of 47 women with N. gonorrhoeae alone, and 16 of 603 women with neither organism. Thus, in North America, C. trachomatis is associated with a syndrome usually diagnosed as mild pelvic inflammatory disease and managed on an outpatient basis.
PubMed ID
7305145 View in PubMed
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Age-related decrease in prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis among pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65053
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 1991 Jul-Sep;18(3):137
Publication Type
Article

Age specific prevalence of antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35988
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(4):393-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
S. Einarsson
H K Sigurdsson
S D Magnusdottir
H. Erlendsdottir
H. Briem
S. Gudmundsson
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland Medical School, Reykjavik.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(4):393-7
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - immunology
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - immunology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Chlamydia pneumoniae is a newly recognized common cause of respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to examine its prevalence in Iceland. The study was based on 1020 serum samples from individuals 0-99 years old. The samples were divided into 10-year age groups. IgG and IgM antibodies were determined with microimmunofluorescence assay. An IgG titer > or = 32 and IgM titer > or = 16 were considered positive. The prevalence of positive IgG titer in the study population was 53 +/- 16% (mean +/- SD, age group range 14-66%). Neither seasonal nor gender-based difference in IgG antibody prevalence was demonstrated. It was lowest in the youngest group, 0-9 years old (p
PubMed ID
7984969 View in PubMed
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AIDS related changes in pattern of sexually transmitted disease (STD) in an STD clinic in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8592
Source
Genitourin Med. 1988 Aug;64(4):270-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988
Author
C S Petersen
J. Søndergaard
G L Wantzin
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatovenereology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Genitourin Med. 1988 Aug;64(4):270-2
Date
Aug-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Condylomata Acuminata - epidemiology
Denmark
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Herpes Genitalis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Syphilis - epidemiology
Abstract
Testing for antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was introduced in 1984 in this major sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Copenhagen, which is attended by about 10,000 new patients each year. From 1984 to 1987 the proportion of patients examined for antibodies to HIV rose from 6% to 32%. The overall incidence of HIV antibody positivity decreased from 30% in 1984 to 3% in 1987, the combined result of decreased positivity in high risk patients tested and increased screening in low risk patients. HIV antibody positivity has been confined largely to homosexual men and drug addicts. Since 1985, however, 21 out of 2623 (0.8%) heterosexuals who were not drug addicts were found to be HIV antibody positive. During 1984-6 the incidence of STDs most often encountered in high risk groups (syphilis and gonorrhoea) decreased by 64% and 41% respectively, whereas the incidence of diseases most often diagnosed in low risk groups (condylomata acuminata and genital herpes) increased by 70% and 34% respectively in the same period. The addition of HIV infection to the list of STDs requires the allocation of more resources to the STD clinics to enable these clinics to handle this new problem. Screening for all patients attending an STD clinic for antibodies to HIV must be considered, and in our area it would be cost effective.
PubMed ID
3169758 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological approach to sexually transmitted diseases--with special reference to contact tracing and screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8297
Source
Acta Derm Venereol Suppl (Stockh). 1991;157:1-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
K. Ramstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermato-Venereology, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol Suppl (Stockh). 1991;157:1-45
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis
Contact Tracing
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sexual Partners
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) are a major health problem all over the world. The diseases are often spread by unsuspecting asymptomatic individuals. One important means of controlling STD is thus the identification of asymptomatic persons. The purposes of this thesis were a) to describe methods of identifying infected individuals through contact tracing and screening, b) to evaluate contact tracing routines, c) to compare epidemiological characteristics of two different groups of chlamydia-infected women and their partners and d) to see if data from contact tracing could be used in a model describing partner choice and STD spread. A microepidemic of penicillinase-producing gonococci was effectively controlled through contact tracing by cooperating counsellors. Serotyping of gonococci and graphic description proved of great help in mapping the contact chain. Contact tracing integrated in the psychosocial long-term care of HIV-infected patients resulted in identification of a great number of previously unidentified individuals. Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) among asymptomatic patients of family planning clinics revealed a 7.3% Ct prevalence. Four factors were significantly correlated to the risk of being infected: age 18-23, duration of present relationship less than 1 year, failure to use condoms and no previous history of genital infection. Abstention from testing was especially high in areas with low socio-economic status. In these areas, increased resources for health care are needed. Five different levels of management of Ct infections were compared. Increased measures to verify that reported partners were examined decreased reinfections and after Ct was included in the STD Act more reported partners than before came for examination. Index patients found by chlamydia screening and their partners have a lower average number of recent partners than index patients visiting an STD clinic and their partners. Partners of female patients in the STD clinic group were also more often Ct-positive. The differences between the groups are small and do not justify different ambitions in partner management. Choice of steady partner was rather restricted and choice of casual partner followed a more random pattern. Our data thus do not support a pure random mixing model for STD spread.
PubMed ID
1927207 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological survey of chlamydial and gonococcal infections in a Canadian arctic community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90552
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2009 Feb;36(2):79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Steenbeek Audrey
Tyndall Mark
Sheps Samuel
Rothenberg Richard
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, NS, Canada. a.steenbeek@dal.ca
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2009 Feb;36(2):79-83
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Chlamydia trachomatis
Contact Tracing
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Prevalence
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Bacterial - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections are leading causes of morbidity for Canadian Aboriginal women. To date, very few initiatives have been successful in screening, treating, and limiting these infections among these populations. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of universal screening, treatment and contact tracing as a means of capturing a more accurate count of chlamydia and gonorrhea prevalence and limiting transmission among Inuit communities. METHODS: 181 participants were screened for chlamydia and gonorrhea and interviewed in a cross-sectional survey (Aug-Sept/03). Information was collected on demographics, use of health services, sexual histories and STI knowledge among others. A random sample (n = 100) from the cross-sectional group was selected for the longitudinal cohort. Individuals were followed every two months post baseline for four visits (Oct/03-May/04). At each visit, participants were screened for chlamydia/gonorrhea. All positive cases and their partners were treated and contact tracing completed. Logistic Regression analysis and the McNemar Test of Correlated Proportions were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Overall, 35 cases of chlamydia were detected, with 21 detected at baseline and 14 during follow-up. The baseline prevalence was 11.6% in comparison with 2.7% that was previously estimated. No gonorrhea was detected. The strongest factor associated with a positive chlamydia was having recent STI (OR 9.82, CI: 2.70, 35.77). CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the literature, the results support the use of universal screening followed by prompt treatment and contact tracing in populations with greater than 10% chlamydia prevalence.
PubMed ID
19125145 View in PubMed
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Associations between three types of maternal bacterial infection and risk of leukemia in the offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16817
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Oct 1;162(7):662-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2005
Author
Matti Lehtinen
Helga M Ogmundsdottir
Aini Bloigu
Timo Hakulinen
Elina Hemminki
Margret Gudnadottir
Anne Kjartansdottir
Jorma Paavonen
Eero Pukkala
Hrafn Tulinius
Tuula Lehtinen
Pentti Koskela
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. llmale@uta.fi
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Oct 1;162(7):662-7
Date
Oct-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - epidemiology - microbiology
Logistic Models
Pneumonia, Mycoplasma - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - microbiology
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
A case-control study was nested within two maternity cohorts with a total of 7 million years of follow-up for assessment of the role of bacterial infections in childhood leukemia. Offspring of 550,000 mothers in Finland and Iceland were combined to form a joint cohort that was followed for cancer up to age 15 years during 1975-1997 through national cancer registries. For each index mother-case pair, three or four matched control mother-control pairs were identified from population registers. First-trimester serum samples were retrieved from mothers of 341 acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases and 61 other leukemia cases and from 1,212 control mothers. Sera were tested for antibodies to the genus Chlamydia, Helicobacter pylori, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for sibship size, were calculated as estimates of relative risk. M. pneumoniae immunoglobulin M appeared to be associated with increased risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6), but the association lost statistical significance when the specificity of the immunoglobulin M was considered (OR = 1.5, 95% confidence interval: 0.9, 2.4). In Iceland, H. pylori immunoglobulin G was associated with increased risk of childhood leukemia in offspring (OR = 2.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 6.9). Since H. pylori immunoglobulin G indicates chronic carriage of the microorganism, early colonization of the offspring probably differs between Iceland and Finland, two affluent countries.
PubMed ID
16120707 View in PubMed
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Care of sexually transmitted infections in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7414
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 2001 Dec;12(12):819-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
H. Moi
Author Affiliation
Olafiaklinikken, Department of STD and HIV, Centre for Preventive Medicine, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. Harald.Moi@ulleval.oslo.kommune.no
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 2001 Dec;12(12):819-23
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chancroid - epidemiology
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genital Diseases, Female - epidemiology
Genital Diseases, Male - epidemiology
Gonorrhea - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Population Surveillance
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Syphilis - epidemiology
Abstract
This article presents an overview of the epidemiology and control of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the Nordic countries. These countries have succeeded in controlling gonorrhoea and syphilis, and the incidence of HIV infection is low. However, during the last few years the incidence of all STIs has increased, although from very low levels. Genital chlamydial infection is still prevalent, and is also increasing. Dermatovenereologists are responsible for the specialized care of STIs, but family doctors and gynaecologists are responsible for the management of a great portion of STIs.
PubMed ID
11779374 View in PubMed
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262 records – page 1 of 27.