Skip header and navigation

Refine By

31 records – page 1 of 4.

An estimation of dental treatment needs in two groups of refugees in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73761
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1990 Jun;48(3):175-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
M. Zimmerman
R. Bornstein
T. Martinsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnosis, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1990 Jun;48(3):175-82
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chile - ethnology
Dental Care
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Periodontal Index
Poland - ethnology
Refugees
Root Canal Therapy
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to estimate dental treatment need in groups of Chilean and Polish refugees in Sweden. Of the Nordic countries, Sweden accepts the greatest number of refugees. An average of 5000 refugees arrived annually in 1981-85, increasing to 15,000 during 1986-87. Refugees and their families now comprise 93% of non-Nordic immigration. In 1981-83 a sample of 193 Chilean and 92 Polish refugees in the county of Stockholm was selected for this study. Dental treatment needs were calculated in accordance with CPITN and the working study of Swedish dentistry, which formed the basis for the Swedish scale of dental fees for the National Dental Insurance Scheme. The estimated mean treatment time (+/- SD) in the Chilean sample was 6.9 +/- 2.3 h and in the Polish group 8.4 +/- 3.0; in comparison with estimated treatment needs in a Swedish material, both would be classified as extreme risk groups. There was no correlation between the number of months in Sweden and the estimated treatment needs. The results indicate a cumulative, unmet need for dental care in these groups. Barriers to ensuring adequate health care for immigrants persist; special outreach programmes, conducted by dental health personnel, may be an effective means of introducing immigrants to the Swedish dental care system.
PubMed ID
2195841 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Armed conflict and trauma: a clinical study of Latin-American refugee children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230662
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Jun;34(5):376-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
C. Rousseau
E. Corin
C. Renaud
Author Affiliation
Unité de recherche psychosociale, Centre de recherche de l'hôpital Douglas, Verdun, Québec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Jun;34(5):376-85
Date
Jun-1989
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Child
Chile - ethnology
Combat Disorders - psychology
El Salvador - ethnology
Extraversion (Psychology)
Family
Female
Guatemala - ethnology
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Introversion (Psychology)
Male
Personality Development
Quebec
Refugees - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - psychology
Violence
Abstract
This exploratory research on psychic consequences of armed conflicts has been carried out in Montreal on 30 latin-americans, eight to 12 year-old refugees. The principal objective was to assert the importance of traumas intensity, accumulation and age of occurrence on the level and type of symptomatology (introversion-extroversion). Using two types of methodologies, clinical scales and in a more exploratory way, projective instruments to study the intra-psychic dynamic underlying the symptomatology observed. The children were classified according to trauma intensity and for this purpose, a trauma scale was defined with latin-american informants. ACHENBACH and DOMINIQUE clinical evaluation scales were applied to the measure of clinical symptomatology. These instruments were analysed as a function of the symptoms intensity and type. Among results, the accumulation and intensity of traumas were found to be in significant correlation with anxio-depressive symptoms, as reported by the children with interiorization symptoms in ACHENBACH. The predominance of interiorization is discussed. The analysis of the TAT, based on objective indicators, brought out a light frequency of violent themes in relations with the clinical symptomatology. This research indicates the relevance of projective instruments to the study of traumatic response.
PubMed ID
2766190 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes and knowledge about preventive dental care in Chilean refugees in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62876
Source
Community Dent Health. 1993 Dec;10(4):343-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
M. Zimmerman
R. Bornstein
T. Martinsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnosis, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Health. 1993 Dec;10(4):343-51
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Chile - ethnology
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Dental Care - psychology
Dentition
Food Habits
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Lactobacillus - isolation & purification
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education
Preventive Dentistry
Refugees
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a simplified oral health programme on attitudes to and knowledge of preventive dentistry. The subjects were Chilean refugees and the programme was delivered at one or two sessions in the form of group information/discussion. Because of increasing immigration, Sweden has become a multicultural society. The number of non-Nordic immigrants has doubled in the past decade. The major refugee groups have come from Iran, Chile and Poland. The subjects comprised 193 Chilean refugees: 106 in a single-visit group and 87 in a two-visit group. The oral health programme was completed by 94 and 65 subjects respectively and was evaluated after 6 months. Positive effects were discernible in attitudes to and knowledge of preventive dentistry, particularly with respect to oral hygiene. A key to success may have been group discussion in which the refugees could relate oral health problems to their own ethnic group. This could have an important function in bridging cultural, linguistic and situational barriers. Different forms of outreach programmes for oral health via groups, organisations or authorities in close contact with refugees shortly after arrival in Sweden are proposed. This approach may be particularly effective in a multicultural society and also in the context of the turbulent conditions the newly-arrived refugee experiences.
PubMed ID
8124622 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer risks in first-generation immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19166
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):218-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Kamila Czene
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):218-28
Date
May-10-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Asia - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Chile - ethnology
Databases
Denmark - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology
Europe - ethnology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Netherlands - ethnology
North America - ethnology
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Romania - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse cancer risks in 613,000 adult immigrants to Sweden. All the immigrants had become parents in Sweden and their median age at immigration was 24 years for men and 22 years for women. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 18 cancer sites using native Swedes as a reference. Data were also available from compatriot marriages. All cancer was decreased by 5% and 8% for immigrant men and women, respectively. However, most of the male increase was due to lung cancer for which male immigrants showed a 41% excess. Among individual cancer sites and immigrant countries, 110 comparisons were significant, 62 showing protection and 48 an increased risk. Most of the differences between the rates in immigrants and Swedes could be ascribed to the variation of cancer incidence in the indigenous populations. Some high immigrant SIRs were 5.05 (n = 6, 95% CI 1.82-11.06) for stomach cancer in Rumanian women and 2.41 (41, 1.73-3.27) for lung cancer in Dutch men. At some sites, such as testis, prostate, skin (melanoma), kidney, cervix and nervous system, the SIRs for immigrants were decreased; in some groups of immigrants SIRs were about 0.20. The highest rates for testicular cancer were noted for Danes and Chileans. Women from Yugoslavia and Turkey had an excess of thyroid tumours. All immigrant groups showed breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers at or below the Swedish level but the differences were no more than 2-fold.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2002 Sep 20;101(3):298; author reply 29912209983
PubMed ID
11979437 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children and torture. An investigation of Chilean immigrant children in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40902
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1980 Nov;27(5):238-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980

Country of birth and body mass index: a national study of 2,000 immigrants in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49636
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(11):1005-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Per Erik Wändell
Sari Ponzer
Sven-Erik Johansson
Kristina Sundquist
Jan Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine Stockholm, Karolinska Institutet, Alfred Nobels allé 12, SE-141 83 Huddinge, Sweden. Per.Wandell@klinvet.ki.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(11):1005-10
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Chile - ethnology
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Poland - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
The aim of this study is to analyse the influence of country of birth on body mass index (BMI) after adjustment for age, educational status, physical activity and smoking habits. Two random samples of men and women, aged 27-60, were used: 1,957 immigrants and 2,975 Swedes, both from 1996. Men and women were analysed in separate models by the use of linear regression. The BMI levels were significantly higher among Polish (0.8 BMI units) and Chilean (0.7 BMI units) men, and Chilean (1.9 BMI units) and Turkish (1.5 BMI units) women than among their Swedish controls, after adjustment for all explanatory variables. Other intermediate risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as physical inactivity and daily smoking, were also more frequent among almost all the immigrant subgroups. This study shows a strong influence of country of birth on BMI even after adjustment for age, educational status, physical activity and smoking habits.
PubMed ID
15648593 View in PubMed
Less detail

Country of origin and bariatric surgery in Sweden during 2001-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276847
Source
Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2015 Nov-Dec;11(6):1332-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ensieh Memarian
Kristina Sundquist
Susanna Calling
Jan Sundquist
Xinjun Li
Source
Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2015 Nov-Dec;11(6):1332-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Age Distribution - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Bariatric Surgery - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Bosnia and Herzegovina - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Chile - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Female - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Forecasting - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Humans - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Incidence - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Lebanon - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Male - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Obesity, Morbid - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Prevalence - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Registries - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Risk Factors - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Sex Distribution - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Sweden - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Young Adult - ethnology - ethnology - statistics & numerical data - ethnology - ethnology - surgery - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of obesity, as well as use of bariatric surgery, has increased worldwide. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential differences in the use of bariatric surgery among Swedes and immigrants in Sweden and whether the hypothesized differences remain after adjustment for socioeconomic factors.
A closed cohort of all individuals aged 20-64 years was followed during 2001-2010. Further analyses were performed in 2 periods separately (2001-2005 and 2006-2010). Age-standardized cumulative incidence rates (CR) of bariatric surgery were compared between Swedes and immigrants considering individual variables. Cox proportional hazards models were used in univariate and multivariate models for males and females.
A total of 12,791 Swedes and 2060 immigrants underwent bariatric surgery. The lowest rates of bariatric surgery were found in immigrant men. The largest difference in CR between Swedes and immigrants was observed among low-income individuals (3.4 and 2.3 per 1000 individuals, respectively). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were lower for all immigrants compared with Swedes in the second period. The highest HRs were observed among immigrants from Chile and Lebanon and the lowest among immigrants from Bosnia. Except for Nordic countries, immigrants from all other European countries had a lower HR compared with Swedes.
Men in general and some immigrant groups had a lower HR of bariatric surgery. Moreover, the difference between Swedes and immigrants was more pronounced in individuals with low socioeconomic status (income). It is unclear if underlying barriers to receive bariatric surgery are due to patients' preferences/lack of knowledge or healthcare structures. Future studies are needed to examine potential causes behind these differences.
Notes
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Jul;22(7):908-1417447097
Cites: Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2007 May-Jun;3(3):392-40717442624
Cites: Ann Surg. 2007 Jan;245(1):59-6717197966
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jul;48(7):668-7416832223
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2006 Mar;48(3):244-5116531828
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2005 Dec;12(6):535-4116319542
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Oct 19;294(15):1909-1716234497
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1998 Feb;27(1):57-639563694
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1997 Sep;21(9):715-379376884
Cites: Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2010 Jan-Feb;6(1):8-1519782647
Cites: Obes Surg. 2010 Oct;20(10):1354-6020052561
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2011 Jul;25(4):357-6521649678
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:45021658213
Cites: Obes Surg. 2012 Feb;22(2):259-6520559894
Cites: Psychodyn Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;40(3):377-9623002701
Cites: Obes Surg. 2013 May;23(5):727-923462861
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013;13:89324074433
Cites: J Gastrointest Surg. 2014 Jan;18(1):130-624101449
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2014 Jan;29(1):68-7524048655
Cites: J Am Coll Surg. 2007 Aug;205(2):248-5517660071
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Aug 23;357(8):741-5217715408
Cites: Obes Res. 2002 Aug;10(8):748-5612181383
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2014 Feb;102:41-824565140
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1995 Jun;13(2):135-407569478
Cites: Am J Surg. 1989 Jan;157(1):93-1022910132
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Aug 2;2(8501):274-62874291
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Oct 13;292(14):1724-3715479938
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Sep 9;351(11):1137-4215356313
Cites: Surgery. 2004 Mar;135(3):288-9614976479
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2003 Dec 2;139(11):933-4914644897
Cites: J Intern Med. 2003 Sep;254(3):236-4312930232
Cites: Obes Res. 2002 Nov;10(11):1135-4212429877
Cites: Obes Res. 2000 Dec;8(9):620-3111225710
Cites: J Intern Med. 2000 Mar;247(3):331-910762449
Cites: Obes Surg. 2014 Dec;24(12):2109-1624817429
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:30419698119
PubMed ID
25979207 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dental health and access to dental care for ethnic minorities in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32729
Source
Ethn Health. 2000 Feb;5(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
A. Hjern
M. Grindefjord
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. anders.hjern@sos.se
Source
Ethn Health. 2000 Feb;5(1):23-32
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chile - ethnology
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Poland - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe access to dental care in a population-based sample of foreign-born Swedish residents in relation to dental health. DESIGN: The study was based on data from the Immigrant Survey of Living Conditions in four minority study groups consisting of a total of 1,898 Swedish residents born in Poland, Chile, Turkey and Iran aged 27-60. An age-matched study group of 2,477 Swedish-born residents from the Survey of Living Conditions of 1996 was added as a comparison group. The study also included 2,228 children aged 3-15 years in the minority households and 2,892 children in the households of the Swedish-born study group. RESULTS: The risk of poor dental health was higher in all four minority study groups than for the Swedish-born study group after adjusting for socio-economic variables. In the adult minority study groups the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for having prostheses and problems with chewing was 6.3 (4.3-9.1) and 2.7 (1.8-4.3), respectively, for the Polish-born, 4.8 (3.3-7.1) and 3.2 (2.1-4.9) for the Chilean-born, 4.6 (3.1-6.9) and 4.8 (3.6-7.2) for the Turkish-born, and 2.7 (1.5-4.8) and 6.5 (4.1-10.3) for the Iranian-born compared with the Swedish-born. In the child study group all four minority groups had an increased risk of caries ranging from OR 1.6 (1.3-2.1) in the Chilean group to 2.5 (2.0-3.0) in the Turkish group compared with the children with Swedish-born parents. The adults in all four minority study groups more often lacked regular treatment by a dentist than Swedish-born residents. The OR for not having been treated by a dentist during the 2 years preceding the interview ranged from 1.9 (1.4-2.6) in the Polish-born study group to 3.0 (2.3-4.0) in the Chilean-born study group after adjustment for socio-economic factors and general health. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that adults in minority populations in Sweden use less dental care despite having greater needs of dental treatment than the majority population. This inequity calls for action in health policy and preventive dental health programmes.
PubMed ID
10858936 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dental health knowledge in a group of Latin American refugees in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62933
Source
Swed Dent J. 1989;13(6):255-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
M. Groisman
G T Bratthall
S G Harari
J A Tapia
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, University of Lund, School of Dentistry, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1989;13(6):255-60
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chile - ethnology
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Health Education, Dental - methods
Humans
Latin America - ethnology
Male
Manuals
Middle Aged
Programmed Instruction
Refugees
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Sixty-nine Latin American refugees with a mean age of 31 years participated in this study. The knowledge about dental health before and after reading a self-instructional manual in Spanish was tested by questionnaires. The test persons were also interviewed about their dietary habits. The results showed an improvement of 30% of right answers after reading the manual and that a frequent sugar consumption was common. This indicates that a self-instructional manual can be of value in oral health prevention in a similar group of non-resident immigrants.
PubMed ID
2603129 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dental health status in two groups of refugees in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73980
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1988 Feb;46(1):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
M. Zimmerman
R. Bornstein
T. Martinsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnosis, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1988 Feb;46(1):19-23
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chile - ethnology
Comparative Study
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Poland - ethnology
Refugees
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine dental health status in two separate groups of Chilean and Polish refugees in Sweden. In Scandinavia, Sweden has the largest number of immigrants--1 million out of a population of 8.3 million. Since 1975, most immigrants have been refugees and their families. During 1978-82 Sweden granted residency to 20,000 refugees, the two largest groups being Chileans and Poles. In 1981-83 a sample of 193 Chilean and 92 Polish refugees in the county of Stockholm were selected for this study. The investigation consisted of a questionnaire followed by clinical examination, including roentgenograms. The average age was 34.0 years in the Chilean group and 34.8 years in the Polish group. The Chileans had been in Sweden for 17.3 months on an average and the Poles for 16.0 months. The Chileans had an average of 10.0 carious surfaces, D(s), and the Poles 11.3. Gingivitis was recorded in 87% of the total number of sites examined in the Chilean group. The corresponding figure in the Polish group was 79%. Of the Chileans 36.5% and of the Poles 32.5% had periodontal pockets measuring more than 5 mm. The results indicate that, when compared with Swedish individuals of a corresponding age, the refugee groups have a high prevalence of caries and periodontal disease.
PubMed ID
3164160 View in PubMed
Less detail

31 records – page 1 of 4.