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Adulthood mortality of infants isolated at birth due to tuberculosis in the family.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31077
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(1):69-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Juha M Veijola
Pirjo H Mäki
Matti I Joukamaa
Esa Läärä
Helinä Hakko
Markku M Nieminen
Matti K Isohanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland. jveijola@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(1):69-72
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
BCG Vaccine - administration & dosage
Cause of Death
Child Custody
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Family Health
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Nurseries
Patient Isolation
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberculosis - prevention & control
Abstract
AIMS: In 1936 the Finnish Anti-Tuberculosis Association founded the first nursery, "Joulumerkkikoti", into which infants born into tuberculous families were admitted and given BCG vaccination to reduce the risk of tuberculosis. This prophylactic regimen was effective in reducing infant mortality and morbidity of tuberculosis. We investigated the mortality of these children later in childhood and adulthood. METHODS: The index cohort consisted of 3,020 subjects born between 1945 and 1965 in Finland and isolated from their family immediately after birth. The average separation time was 218 days. The subjects alive on 1 January 1971 were identified. For every index subject two reference subjects were chosen, the matching criteria being sex, year, and place of birth. Data on causes of deaths were obtained from the Finnish Cause of Death Registry by the end of 1998. RESULTS: The relative mortality rate (RR) was higher in the index cohort than in the reference cohort for all causes of death (RR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.7), and particularly for unnatural deaths: RR 1.5 (1.1-1.9) for men and RR 1.9 (1.0-3.7) for women. CONCLUSIONS: The mortality in the index subjects later in childhood and adulthood was somewhat elevated. This may be explained by a variety of risks experienced during pregnancy, delivery, and childhood. The fall in the socioeconomic status of the family of origin due to tuberculosis may partially explain the result. Another interpretation is that the very early separation from the mother had unfavourable effects on later psychological developments in some children.
PubMed ID
12623528 View in PubMed
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Childhood and adolescence risk factors and development of depressive symptoms: the 32-year prospective Young Finns follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274703
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2015 Nov;69(11):1109-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Marko Elovainio
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Christian Hakulinen
Jane E Ferrie
Markus Jokela
Mirka Hintsanen
Olli T Raitakari
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2015 Nov;69(11):1109-17
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Change Events
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multilevel Analysis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Class
Social Environment
Time
Abstract
Environmental risks in childhood have been shown to predict later depressive symptoms. In this study, we examined whether various environmental risk domains in childhood and adolescence, socioeconomic, psychoemotional, parental lifestyle and life-events, predict depressive symptom trajectories in adulthood individually by domain and as a cumulative risk score across domains.
Participants were a nationally representative sample of 1289 men and 1585 women from the Young Finns study, aged 3-18 years at study entry in 1980. They responded to questions on depressive symptoms (modified version of the Beck Depression Inventory) at four study phases from 1997 to 2012.
Findings from longitudinal repeated multilevel modelling showed that all clusters of risk within domain and the cumulative risk score were associated with later depressive symptoms (regression coefficient range from 0.07 to 0.34). Socioeconomic risk, psychoemotional risk and the cumulative risk score predicted later depressive symptoms after adjustment for the effects of adulthood risk. No interaction with time was observed.
Our findings suggest that environment risks in childhood and adolescence, particularly in the socioeconomic and psychoemotional domains, are associated with a higher risk, but not an increased progression, of depressive symptoms in adulthood.
PubMed ID
26082517 View in PubMed
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Childhood motor coordination and adult schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149649
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;166(9):1041-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Jason Schiffman
Holger J Sorensen
Justin Maeda
Erik L Mortensen
Jeff Victoroff
Kentaro Hayashi
Niels M Michelsen
Morten Ekstrom
Sarnoff Mednick
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA. schiffma@umbc.edu
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;166(9):1041-7
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Basal Ganglia - physiopathology
Cerebellum - physiopathology
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - genetics
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Neurologic Examination
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
The authors examined whether motor coordination difficulties assessed in childhood predict later adult schizophrenia spectrum outcomes.
A standardized childhood neurological examination was administered to a sample of 265 Danish children in 1972, when participants were 10-13 years old. Adult diagnostic information was available for 244 members of the sample. Participants fell into three groups: children whose mothers or fathers had a psychiatric hospital diagnosis of schizophrenia (N=94); children who had at least one parent with a psychiatric record of hospitalization for a nonpsychotic disorder (N=84); and children with no parental records of psychiatric hospitalization (N=66). Psychiatric outcomes of the offspring were assessed through psychiatric interviews in 1992 when participants were 31-33 years of age, as well as through a scan of national psychiatric registers completed in May 2007.
Children who later developed a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (N=32) displayed significantly higher scores on a scale of coordination deficits compared with those who did not develop a mental illness in this category (N=133).
Results from this study provide further support for the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia and underscore the potential role of cerebellar and/or basal ganglia abnormalities in the etiology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19605535 View in PubMed
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Children in Beardslee's family intervention: relieved by understanding of parental mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131490
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;58(6):623-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Heljä Pihkala
Mikael Sandlund
Anita Cederström
Author Affiliation
Skellefteå Hospital, Psychiatric Clinic, Skellefteå, Sweden. helja.p@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;58(6):623-8
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Communication
Disclosure
Family
Family Therapy - methods
Female
Guilt
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Parents
Questionnaires
Resilience, Psychological
Shame
Sweden
Abstract
Beardslee's family intervention (FI), which is a family-based preventive method for children of mentally ill parents, has been implemented on a national level in Sweden.
Fourteen children and parents from nine families were interviewed about how the FI was for the children. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis.
A central finding was children's sense of relief and release from worry because of more knowledge and openness about the parent's illness in the family.
The results indicating relief for the children are encouraging.
PubMed ID
21900288 View in PubMed
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Children in families with a severely mentally ill member. Prevalence and needs for support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31477
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):243-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Margareta Ostman
Lars Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, University Hospital, 22185 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):243-8
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The prevalence of minor children in families with a severely mentally ill member, these children's needs for support and the situation of the spouses were investigated as part of a multi-centre study of the quality of the mental health services in Sweden performed in 1986, 1991 and 1997. METHODS: The sample was drawn from relatives of compulsorily and voluntarily admitted inpatients to acute psychiatric wards. The instrument used was a semi-structured questionnaire, interviewing relatives about the burden of relatives, their needs for support and participation in care and items concerning the situation of the under-aged children in these families. RESULTS: The results over the years investigated showed the same proportion of patients admitted to hospital who were also parents to minor children and a decreasing proportion of patients who had the custody of their children. Female patients were more often a parent and also more often had the custody of the children. The majority of the children had needs for support caused by their parent's illness and these needs were met in half of the cases. The healthy spouses in families with minor children more often had to give up their own occupation and to a higher extent experienced own needs for care and support from psychiatric services compared to spouses without minor children. CONCLUSIONS: The study supports that there is an urgent need for the psychiatric services to initiate parental issues in programmes for treatment and rehabilitation to ensure that the specific needs of minor children are met.
PubMed ID
12107717 View in PubMed
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[Children of mentally retarded mothers--an inventory. Small group at risk with considerable need of assistance during an insecure childhood]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31139
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jan 9;100(1-2):22-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-2003
Author
Börje Bager
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jan 9;100(1-2):22-5
Date
Jan-9-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Development
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intelligence Tests
Male
Mental Retardation - diagnosis
Mothers
Parenting - psychology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Social Support
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Children born to mentally retarded mothers usually have normal intelligence. Their fathers often suffer from psychosocial problems. These children often grow up in an environment of insecurity and understimulation. How many are there? In 1995 an inventory was made in Skaraborg county (275,000 inhabitants), Sweden, based on the mothers' registration with the county authorities responsible for supporting people with mental retardation and on the general population register. A prevalence of 1.4 per thousand was found. Reasons for a higher true prevalence are discussed. The majority of the mothers had mild mental retardation. The rate of childbearing among mentally retarded women fell from 30 to 15 percent over the last three decades up to 1995. The prevalence for women with mental retardation was at least 1.1 percent.
PubMed ID
12572132 View in PubMed
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Children of mothers who are at psycho-social risk. Mental health, behaviour problems and incidence of child abuse at age 8 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34664
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1996 Sep;5(3):162-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
C G Svedin
M. Wadsby
G. Sydsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1996 Sep;5(3):162-71
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Child Development
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Mental health
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Social Environment
Substance-Related Disorders - complications
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Of the 1575 pregnant women registered at the public Antenatal Health Care Service in the city of Linköping, Sweden, during 1983, an index-group of 78 women were identified who met specific well-defined psychosocial risk-criteria related to drug addiction, mental insufficiency, and particular social circumstances of possible relevance to problems of pregnancy and early child development. Seventy-eight pregnant women who did not meet the inclusion criteria were used as a reference group. The present study was an 8-year follow up in which 47 of the original index children and 57 of the original reference children were examined on indices of mental health, and the presence of child abuse. Their mental health was assessed on the basis of a Symptom and Behaviour Interview (SBI) with the mother and a Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) completed by the mothers and the teachers. The incidence of child abuse was obtained from Social Welfare records. The index children displayed significantly poorer mental health as assessed by the SBI and the CBCL, had a more negative self-image, and child abuse had been investigated in 30% of the index families compared to 1% in the reference families. The study suggests, based on the suboptimal development of the risk children, that screening for early psychosocial risk factors should be done routinely and be combined with early interventions.
PubMed ID
8908423 View in PubMed
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Children of treatment-seeking depressed mothers: a comparison with the sequenced treatment alternatives to relieve depression (STAR*D) child study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119449
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;51(11):1185-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Lisa A Batten
Mariely Hernandez
Daniel J Pilowsky
Jonathan W Stewart
Pierre Blier
Martine F Flament
Ernest Poh
Priya Wickramaratne
Myrna M Weissman
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa Institute of Mental Health Research, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;51(11):1185-96
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
New York City - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Abstract
To estimate the prevalence of current psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents (collectively called children) of mothers entering treatment for depression; to examine maternal predictors of child psychopathology among children of depressed mothers; and to determine consistency of findings with a similar child study ancillary to Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Reduce Depression (STAR?D) from seven United States sites (STAR?D-Child).
Mothers (N = 82) with major depressive disorder (MDD) enrolled in a treatment study in Ottawa (Ontario, Canada) or New York City, and their eligible children (N = 145) (aged 7 through 17 years) were assessed independently when the mother enrolled.
Among the children of depressed mothers, 42% had at least one current psychiatric diagnosis, including affective (15%), anxiety (19%), behavioral (23%), and/or substance use (2%) disorders. In all, 40% of the children were rated as impaired by clinical assessors. Mothers' comorbid anxiety disorders predicted the highest rates of current disorders in the child in both studies. The severity of the mother's depression predicted behavioral problems in the child. The current and lifetime rates of psychiatric disorders in the children of depressed mothers were compared to rates found in STAR?D Child and findings were consistent. Both studies used similar diagnostic assessments.
Given the high prevalence of offspring psychiatric disorders, inquiring about the mental health of the children when a depressed mother comes for treatment, and referring children for treatment when appropriate, are important.
PubMed ID
23101744 View in PubMed
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A comparison of the cumulative incidence and early risk factors for psychotic disorder in young adults in the Northern Finland Birth Cohorts 1966 and 1986.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295538
Source
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2017 06; 26(3):314-324
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2017
Author
S Filatova
R Marttila
H Koivumaa-Honkanen
T Nordström
J Veijola
P Mäki
G M Khandaker
M Isohanni
E Jääskeläinen
K Moilanen
J Miettunen
Author Affiliation
Center for Life Course Health Research,University of Oulu,Oulu,Finland.
Source
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2017 06; 26(3):314-324
Date
06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Registries
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies have compared time trends for the incidence of psychosis. To date, the results have been inconsistent, showing a decline, an increase or no significant change. As far as we know, no studies explored changes in prevalence of early risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in early risk factors and cumulative incidences of psychosis by type of psychosis in two comparable birth cohorts.
The Northern Finland Birth cohorts (NFBCs) 1966 (N = 12 058) and 1986 (N = 9432) are prospective general population-based cohorts with the children followed since mother's mid-pregnancy. The data for psychoses, i.e. schizophrenia (narrow, spectrum), bipolar disorder with psychotic features, major depressive episode with psychotic features, brief psychosis and other psychoses (ICD 8-10) were collected from nationwide registers including both inpatients and outpatients. The data on early risk factors including sex and place of birth of the offspring, parental age and psychosis, maternal education at birth were prospectively collected from the population registers. The follow-up reached until the age of 27 years.
An increase in the cumulative incidence of all psychoses was seen (1.01% in NFBC 1966 v. 1.90% in NFBC 1986; p
PubMed ID
27018550 View in PubMed
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Could gender equality in parental leave harm off-springs' mental health? A registry study of the Swedish parental/child cohort of 1988/89.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125658
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lisa Norström
Lene Lindberg
Anna Månsdotter
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:19
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - complications - drug therapy
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - complications - drug therapy
Family Characteristics
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parent-Child Relations
Parental Leave - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prejudice
Registries
Sex Factors
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Mental ill-health among children and young adults is a growing public health problem and research into causes involves consideration of family life and gender practice. This study aimed at exploring the association between parents' degree of gender equality in childcare and children's mental ill-health.
The population consisted of Swedish parents and their firstborn child in 1988-1989 (N = 118 595 family units) and the statistical method was multiple logistic regression. Gender equality of childcare was indicated by the division of parental leave (1988-1990), and child mental ill-health was indicated by outpatient mental care (2001-2006) and drug prescription (2005-2008), for anxiety and depression.
The overall finding was that boys with gender traditional parents (mother dominance in childcare) have lower risk of depression measured by outpatient mental care than boys with gender-equal parents, while girls with gender traditional and gender untraditional parents (father dominance in childcare) have lower risk of anxiety measured by drug prescription than girls with gender-equal parents.
This study suggests that unequal parenting regarding early childcare, whether traditional or untraditional, is more beneficial for offspring's mental health than equal parenting. However, further research is required to confirm our findings and to explore the pathways through which increased gender equality may influence child health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22463683 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.