Skip header and navigation

Refine By

22 records – page 1 of 3.

Antisocial behaviour in adolescent suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218671
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1994 Mar;89(3):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
M J Marttunen
H M Aro
M M Henriksson
J K Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1994 Mar;89(3):167-73
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antisocial Personality Disorder - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Personality Assessment
Personality Development
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Social Adjustment
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology
Violence
Abstract
Antisocial behaviour among adolescent suicide victims (44 males, 9 females) was investigated in a nationwide psychological autopsy study of suicides in Finland. The data were collected through interviews of the victims' relatives and attending health care personnel, and from official records. Antisocial behaviour was reported among 43% of the victims. Separation from parents, parental alcohol abuse and parental violence were common among male victims with antisocial behaviour. Their psychosocial adjustment was poor, and they had experienced severe stressors. Depressive disorders were common among all suicides, but male victims with antisocial behaviour had more often alcohol abuse and comorbid mental disorders compared with victims without antisocial behaviour. The results indicate a strong relatedness between adolescent suicide and antisocial behaviour. Recognition and treatment of manifest mental symptoms and evaluation of suicide risk among adolescents with antisocial behaviour and substance abuse is emphasized. Antisocial symptoms with relatively short duration and not severe enough to meet the criteria for actual antisocial disorders also need to be taken into account.
PubMed ID
8178674 View in PubMed
Less detail

Case report of a female-to-male transsexual homicide offender.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222638
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 1992 Dec;26(4):661-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
J M Lawrence
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Queensland.
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 1992 Dec;26(4):661-5
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - genetics - psychology
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Homicide - psychology
Humans
Personality Development
Psychosexual Development
Social Environment
Transsexualism - psychology
Violence
Abstract
A 22 year old female-to-male half-Aboriginal transsexual had been exposed to gross neglect and violence, separation and inconsistent cultural supports during childhood. Her mother had also been convicted of homicide in a context of alcohol and violence. Transsexual identification, antisocial behaviours, self mutilation, substance abuse and unmet dependency needs were evident from childhood or early adolescence. The killing was a confrontational peer group stabbing in a brawl under influence of alcohol--the male mode of homicide. This is the first known case in world literature of a female-to-male transsexual guilty of homicide.
PubMed ID
1476532 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characteristics of violent alcoholics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11539
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1994 Jul;29(4):451-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
B. Bergman
B. Brismar
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1994 Jul;29(4):451-7
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Development
Risk factors
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Suicide - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Sweden
Temperance - psychology
Violence
Abstract
This study is based on interviews with 53 male alcoholics. Its purpose was to study the relationship between childhood conditions, history of alcohol and drug misuse and assaultive and suicidal behaviour. Fifty-seven per cent of the alcoholics reported a history of violent behaviour. Hidden violence, often towards women, was common. One-third of the violent patients had a history of attempted suicide compared to 17% in the non-violent group. The assaultive alcoholics also had a more violent childhood, a higher proportion of fathers with alcohol problems and had started drinking earlier in life. Drug addiction was much more common in this group too. We find support for our hypothesis that there is a positive correlation between violence in the parental home and assaultive and suicidal behaviour and drug misuse later in life. When violent and non-violent alcoholics are compared many of the same characteristics appear as when suicidal and non-suicidal and type 2 and type 1 alcoholics are compared. This study raises the question of adding attempted suicide as a characteristic of the type 2 alcoholic.
PubMed ID
7986283 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood roots of adulthood hostility: family factors as predictors of cognitive and affective hostility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182443
Source
Child Dev. 2003 Nov-Dec;74(6):1751-68
Publication Type
Article
Author
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Kati Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland. liisa.keltikangas-jarvinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Child Dev. 2003 Nov-Dec;74(6):1751-68
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affect
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Cognition
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - psychology
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hostility
Humans
Irritable Mood
Parents - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Personality Development
Risk factors
Socialization
Socioeconomic Factors
Type A Personality
Abstract
Childhood predictors of adulthood hostility was examined in a population-based sample of 1,004 children and their parents. Parents' Type A behavior, their life satisfaction, family's socioeconomic level, and maternal reports of children's Type A behavior were obtained for 6-, 9-, and 12-year-old participants. Hostility was self-evaluated by these participants 15 years later. Results revealed that childhood environment in terms of parental Type A behavior and life dissatisfaction as well as children's own Type A behavior predicted their adulthood hostility. The findings identified childhood environments that either promoted or protected against hostility. Results underline the need to consider the conjoint effects of various factors because the same characteristics play different roles in different contexts.
PubMed ID
14669894 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children in families with a severely mentally ill member. Prevalence and needs for support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31477
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):243-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Margareta Ostman
Lars Hansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, University Hospital, 22185 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):243-8
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The prevalence of minor children in families with a severely mentally ill member, these children's needs for support and the situation of the spouses were investigated as part of a multi-centre study of the quality of the mental health services in Sweden performed in 1986, 1991 and 1997. METHODS: The sample was drawn from relatives of compulsorily and voluntarily admitted inpatients to acute psychiatric wards. The instrument used was a semi-structured questionnaire, interviewing relatives about the burden of relatives, their needs for support and participation in care and items concerning the situation of the under-aged children in these families. RESULTS: The results over the years investigated showed the same proportion of patients admitted to hospital who were also parents to minor children and a decreasing proportion of patients who had the custody of their children. Female patients were more often a parent and also more often had the custody of the children. The majority of the children had needs for support caused by their parent's illness and these needs were met in half of the cases. The healthy spouses in families with minor children more often had to give up their own occupation and to a higher extent experienced own needs for care and support from psychiatric services compared to spouses without minor children. CONCLUSIONS: The study supports that there is an urgent need for the psychiatric services to initiate parental issues in programmes for treatment and rehabilitation to ensure that the specific needs of minor children are met.
PubMed ID
12107717 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children of parents with bipolar disorder: a metaanalysis of risk for mental disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207800
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1997 Aug;42(6):623-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
M. Lapalme
S. Hodgins
C. LaRoche
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Quebec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1997 Aug;42(6):623-31
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Parenting - psychology
Personality Development
Risk assessment
Abstract
To compare the prevalence rates of mental disorders among children of parents with bipolar disorder and of parents with no mental disorders.
Seventeen studies, meeting specific selection criteria, were included in the metaanalyses. Risks for mental disorders among children were estimated by aggregating raw data from the selected studies.
Results indicate that in comparison with children of parents with no mental disorders, children of parents with bipolar disorder are 2.7 times more likely to develop any mental disorder and 4.0 times more likely to develop an affective disorder. The metaanalyses indicate that during childhood and adolescence, the risks for any mental disorder and for affective disorders in children are consistently but moderately related to having a parent who suffers from bipolar disorder.
Risk factors that could account for the psychopathology observed in children of bipolar parents are explored.
PubMed ID
9288425 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cluster suicide in rural western Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220426
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Sep;38(7):515-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
D. Davies
T R Wilkes
Author Affiliation
Hospital Services, Lethbridge Regional Hospital, Lethbridge, Calgary, Alberta.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Sep;38(7):515-9
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Personality Development
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper focuses on a series of adolescent suicides which occurred in a small rural community in Western Canada between December 1989 and June 1990. Risk factors for adolescent suicide and recent epidemiological data on cluster suicide are reviewed and discussed. The circumstances of the five adolescent suicides are then discussed, and the question of whether or not this was a cluster suicide is considered. This article supports the view that suicide is an abnormal response to stress or loss and emphasizes the role of genetic psychophysiological predisposition.
PubMed ID
8242525 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depressive vulnerability in parents and their 5-year-old child's temperament: a family system perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166023
Source
J Fam Psychol. 2006 Dec;20(4):648-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Katri Räikkönen
Kati Heinonen
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Fam Psychol. 2006 Dec;20(4):648-55
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Child, Preschool
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Extraversion (Psychology)
Family Relations
Family Therapy
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Personality Assessment
Personality Development
Systems Theory
Temperament
Abstract
The actor-partner interdependence model was used to test whether one parent's depressive vulnerability (self-criticism and dependency) was associated with the same parent's own (an intraparental association) and the other parent's (a cross-parental association) ratings of their 5-year-old child's temperament (536 parents, 268 dyads). The more vulnerable the parents were, the more the children showed negative affectivity and lack of effortful control. Significant interactions with the parent's gender and between the spouses' depressive vulnerabilities were found, highlighting the fact that child outcomes are dependent on family processes. All associations were independent of maternal and paternal depressive symptoms. The influence of personality-based depressive traits on child temperamental outcomes and effective parenting is discussed with reference to between-dyad family dynamics.
PubMed ID
17176200 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differences in family of origin functioning among graduate students of different disciplines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5111
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1995 May;51(3):434-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
C. Brems
S. Tryck
D. Garlock
M. Freemon
J. Bernzott
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage, USA.
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1995 May;51(3):434-41
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Career Choice
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Comparative Study
Education, Graduate
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Development
Psychology, Clinical - education
Abstract
Compared the degree of dysfunction in the family of origin of psychology graduate students to that of graduate students in the disciplines of business, education, engineering, and health sciences. Students were accessed through University of Alaska Anchorage graduate departments. Family background was assessed with the Index of Family Relations (IFR; Hudson, 1990a), the Self-Report Family Inventory (SFI; Beavers, Hampson, & Hulgus, 1990), and relevant demographics obtained from a biographical questionnaire. Results indicated significant differences among the student groups; psychology graduate students demonstrated higher degrees of family dysfunction than students in other disciplines. Implications of these findings for psychology graduate training programs are discussed.
PubMed ID
7560148 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors in childhood and youth predicting alcohol dependence and abuse in Swedish women: findings from a general population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11058
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1997 May-Jun;32(3):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Spak
F. Spak
P. Allebeck
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Göteborg University, Vasa Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1997 May-Jun;32(3):267-74
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Mass Screening
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Personality Development
Personality Inventory
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim was to assess risk factors during childhood and youth for alcohol dependence/abuse (ADA) in a population-based study of Swedish women. A total of 316 women were interviewed after stratified random sampling in the general population and a screening questionnaire. The interviews focused on social, psychological and behaviour characteristics as well as on early substance use patterns. Alcohol diagnoses were made according to DSM-III-R and CIDI-SAM. Experiences of sexual abuse before the age of 13 years, a history of psychological or psychiatric problems, early deviant behaviour and an episode of alcohol intoxication before the age of 15 years were significantly associated with ADA in a logistic model. General indicators of low social class were not associated with increased risk of ADA in a multivariate analysis. Sexual abuse in childhood was the strongest predictor of ADA. This association has potential public health importance, and should be addressed in future studies on women and alcohol.
PubMed ID
9199727 View in PubMed
Less detail

22 records – page 1 of 3.