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Adulthood mortality of infants isolated at birth due to tuberculosis in the family.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31077
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(1):69-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Juha M Veijola
Pirjo H Mäki
Matti I Joukamaa
Esa Läärä
Helinä Hakko
Markku M Nieminen
Matti K Isohanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland. jveijola@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(1):69-72
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
BCG Vaccine - administration & dosage
Cause of Death
Child Custody
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Family Health
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Nurseries
Patient Isolation
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberculosis - prevention & control
Abstract
AIMS: In 1936 the Finnish Anti-Tuberculosis Association founded the first nursery, "Joulumerkkikoti", into which infants born into tuberculous families were admitted and given BCG vaccination to reduce the risk of tuberculosis. This prophylactic regimen was effective in reducing infant mortality and morbidity of tuberculosis. We investigated the mortality of these children later in childhood and adulthood. METHODS: The index cohort consisted of 3,020 subjects born between 1945 and 1965 in Finland and isolated from their family immediately after birth. The average separation time was 218 days. The subjects alive on 1 January 1971 were identified. For every index subject two reference subjects were chosen, the matching criteria being sex, year, and place of birth. Data on causes of deaths were obtained from the Finnish Cause of Death Registry by the end of 1998. RESULTS: The relative mortality rate (RR) was higher in the index cohort than in the reference cohort for all causes of death (RR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.7), and particularly for unnatural deaths: RR 1.5 (1.1-1.9) for men and RR 1.9 (1.0-3.7) for women. CONCLUSIONS: The mortality in the index subjects later in childhood and adulthood was somewhat elevated. This may be explained by a variety of risks experienced during pregnancy, delivery, and childhood. The fall in the socioeconomic status of the family of origin due to tuberculosis may partially explain the result. Another interpretation is that the very early separation from the mother had unfavourable effects on later psychological developments in some children.
PubMed ID
12623528 View in PubMed
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Anticipation in unipolar affective disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35126
Source
J Affect Disord. 1995 Oct 9;35(1-2):31-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-1995
Author
C. Engström
A S Thornlund
E L Johansson
M. Långström
J. Chotai
R. Adolfsson
P O Nylander
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Affect Disord. 1995 Oct 9;35(1-2):31-40
Date
Oct-9-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - genetics - mortality - psychology
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Life tables
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Trinucleotide Repeats
Abstract
Anticipation describes an inheritance pattern within a pedigree with an increase in disease severity and/or decrease in age at onset in successive generations. The phenomenon of anticipation has recently been shown to be correlated with the expansion of trinucleotide repeat sequences in a neuromuscular disease, various neurodegenerative disorders and mental retardation. We have studied parent-offspring differences in age at onset and disease severity in 31 pairs with unilineal inheritance of unipolar affective disorder (UPAD). Life-table analyses showed a significant decrease in survival to 1st episode of major depression in the offspring generation compared with the parental generation (P = 0.0007). There was also a significant difference in age at onset (P
PubMed ID
8557885 View in PubMed
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Childhood predictors of future psychiatric morbidity in offspring of mothers with psychotic disorder: results from the Helsinki High-Risk Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176373
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;186:108-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Lauri T Niemi
Jaana M Suvisaari
Jari K Haukka
Jouko K Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. laura.niemi@ktl.fi
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;186:108-14
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Developmental Disabilities - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Mental Disorders - etiology
Psychotic Disorders
Schizophrenia
Abstract
The Helsinki High-Risk Study monitors women treated for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders in Helsinki mental hospitals before 1975, their offspring, and controls.
To compare the development of high-risk and control group children, and investigate which factors predicted future psychiatric disorders.
We examined information from childhood and school health record cards of 159 high-risk and 99 control group offspring. Logistic regression was used to assess whether developmental abnormalities predicted later mental disorders.
Compared with controls, children in the high-risk group had more emotional symptoms before school age, attentional problems and social inhibition at school age, and neurological soft signs throughout. In this group pre-school social adjustment problems (OR=9.7, 95% CI 1.8-51.8) or severe neurological symptoms (Fisher's test, P=0.006) predicted future schizophrenia-spectrum disorder. Social adjustment problems and emotional symptoms during school age predicted future non-psychotic psychiatric disorders.
Our study supports the validity of neurological, emotional, social and behavioural markers as vulnerability indicators of psychotic and other mental disorders, particularly among children genetically at high risk of psychosis.
PubMed ID
15684232 View in PubMed
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Childhood roots of adulthood hostility: family factors as predictors of cognitive and affective hostility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182443
Source
Child Dev. 2003 Nov-Dec;74(6):1751-68
Publication Type
Article
Author
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Kati Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland. liisa.keltikangas-jarvinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Child Dev. 2003 Nov-Dec;74(6):1751-68
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affect
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Cognition
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - psychology
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hostility
Humans
Irritable Mood
Parents - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Personality Development
Risk factors
Socialization
Socioeconomic Factors
Type A Personality
Abstract
Childhood predictors of adulthood hostility was examined in a population-based sample of 1,004 children and their parents. Parents' Type A behavior, their life satisfaction, family's socioeconomic level, and maternal reports of children's Type A behavior were obtained for 6-, 9-, and 12-year-old participants. Hostility was self-evaluated by these participants 15 years later. Results revealed that childhood environment in terms of parental Type A behavior and life dissatisfaction as well as children's own Type A behavior predicted their adulthood hostility. The findings identified childhood environments that either promoted or protected against hostility. Results underline the need to consider the conjoint effects of various factors because the same characteristics play different roles in different contexts.
PubMed ID
14669894 View in PubMed
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A comparison of the cumulative incidence and early risk factors for psychotic disorder in young adults in the Northern Finland Birth Cohorts 1966 and 1986.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295538
Source
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2017 06; 26(3):314-324
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2017
Author
S Filatova
R Marttila
H Koivumaa-Honkanen
T Nordström
J Veijola
P Mäki
G M Khandaker
M Isohanni
E Jääskeläinen
K Moilanen
J Miettunen
Author Affiliation
Center for Life Course Health Research,University of Oulu,Oulu,Finland.
Source
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2017 06; 26(3):314-324
Date
06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Registries
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies have compared time trends for the incidence of psychosis. To date, the results have been inconsistent, showing a decline, an increase or no significant change. As far as we know, no studies explored changes in prevalence of early risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in early risk factors and cumulative incidences of psychosis by type of psychosis in two comparable birth cohorts.
The Northern Finland Birth cohorts (NFBCs) 1966 (N = 12 058) and 1986 (N = 9432) are prospective general population-based cohorts with the children followed since mother's mid-pregnancy. The data for psychoses, i.e. schizophrenia (narrow, spectrum), bipolar disorder with psychotic features, major depressive episode with psychotic features, brief psychosis and other psychoses (ICD 8-10) were collected from nationwide registers including both inpatients and outpatients. The data on early risk factors including sex and place of birth of the offspring, parental age and psychosis, maternal education at birth were prospectively collected from the population registers. The follow-up reached until the age of 27 years.
An increase in the cumulative incidence of all psychoses was seen (1.01% in NFBC 1966 v. 1.90% in NFBC 1986; p
PubMed ID
27018550 View in PubMed
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Could gender equality in parental leave harm off-springs' mental health? A registry study of the Swedish parental/child cohort of 1988/89.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125658
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lisa Norström
Lene Lindberg
Anna Månsdotter
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:19
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - complications - drug therapy
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - complications - drug therapy
Family Characteristics
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parent-Child Relations
Parental Leave - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prejudice
Registries
Sex Factors
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Mental ill-health among children and young adults is a growing public health problem and research into causes involves consideration of family life and gender practice. This study aimed at exploring the association between parents' degree of gender equality in childcare and children's mental ill-health.
The population consisted of Swedish parents and their firstborn child in 1988-1989 (N = 118 595 family units) and the statistical method was multiple logistic regression. Gender equality of childcare was indicated by the division of parental leave (1988-1990), and child mental ill-health was indicated by outpatient mental care (2001-2006) and drug prescription (2005-2008), for anxiety and depression.
The overall finding was that boys with gender traditional parents (mother dominance in childcare) have lower risk of depression measured by outpatient mental care than boys with gender-equal parents, while girls with gender traditional and gender untraditional parents (father dominance in childcare) have lower risk of anxiety measured by drug prescription than girls with gender-equal parents.
This study suggests that unequal parenting regarding early childcare, whether traditional or untraditional, is more beneficial for offspring's mental health than equal parenting. However, further research is required to confirm our findings and to explore the pathways through which increased gender equality may influence child health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22463683 View in PubMed
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Criminality in the offspring of antenatally depressed mothers: a 33-year follow-up of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30959
Source
J Affect Disord. 2003 May;74(3):273-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Pirjo Mäki
Juha Veijola
Pirkko Räsänen
Matti Joukamaa
Pauliina Valonen
Jari Jokelainen
Matti Isohanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland. pirjo.maki@oulu.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2003 May;74(3):273-8
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Catchment Area (Health)
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: No epidemiological studies have been reported on the association between mothers' antenatal depression and criminality in their offspring. METHODS: The material consists of a general population cohort of 12059 children born in 1966 in Northern Finland and followed to the end of 1998. Mothers were asked at midgestation by a nurse at the antenatal clinic if they felt themselves to be depressed. The Finnish Ministry of Justice provided information for all descendants on criminal offences. The associations between maternal depression and subgroups of violent and non-violent, violent recidive and non-recidive criminality in male and female offspring were analysed. RESULTS: Of the mothers 14% had depressed mood during pregnancy. A total of 607 (10.9%) male and 72 (1.3%) female criminal offenders were included in the cohort. When adjusted for mother's marital status, smoking, wantedness of the pregnancy, place of residence, socioeconomic status and perinatal complications, the odds ratio (OR) for males was 1.4 (95% CI 1.0-1.9) in the association between maternal depression and non-violent offenders, 1.6 (1.1-2.4) between maternal depression and violent offenders and 1.7 (1.0-3.0) between maternal depression and violent recidivists. The adjusted OR for females involved in non-violent crimes was 1.7 (0.9-3.3) and 0.6 (0.1-6.0) for violent crimes. LIMITATIONS: Maternal depression was not checked using a standardized assessment. CONCLUSIONS: For male offspring of antenatally depressed mothers there was a significant but slight increase in criminality. The emotional state of a pregnant mother may have some, but limited, influence on later criminality in the offspring.
PubMed ID
12738046 View in PubMed
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Cumulative exposure to childhood adversity, and treated attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a cohort study of 543 650 adolescents and young adults in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296227
Source
Psychol Med. 2018 02; 48(3):498-507
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
E Björkenstam
C Björkenstam
B Jablonska
K Kosidou
Author Affiliation
Division of Social Medicine,Department of Public Health Sciences,Karolinska Institutet,Stockholm,Sweden.
Source
Psychol Med. 2018 02; 48(3):498-507
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - drug therapy - epidemiology
Causality
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Family Health
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Male
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Though childhood adversity (CA) has been associated with the risk of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little is known about the effect of cumulative CAs and whether there are clusters of CAs that are more closely related with ADHD.
We used a Swedish cohort of 543 650 individuals born 1987-1991. Register-based CAs included familial death, substantial parental substance abuse and psychiatric disorder, substantial parental criminality, parental separation, household public assistance recipiency, and residential instability. Individuals were followed from year 2006 when they were 15-19 years of age, for treated ADHD, defined as a registered ICD diagnosis and/or prescription of medications to treat ADHD. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Latent Class Analyses (LCA) were used to identify clusters based on the different CAs.
All CAs increased the odds of ADHD in late adolescence and early adulthood; ORs ranged from 1.6 (95% CI 1.5-1.8) for familial death to 2.7 (95% CI 2.6-2.9) for household public assistance. We found a dose-response relationship between cumulative CA and ADHD; individuals with 4+ CAs had a markedly increased risk for ADHD (OR 5.5, 95% CI 5.0-6.0). LCA analyses revealed six distinct classes of CA associated with ADHD, of which 'exposure to most adversities' entailed highest risk.
CA is a strong risk factor for ADHD, particularly when accumulated. Early and efficient detection of CA is of importance for interventions targeted to improve long-term mental health outcomes among disadvantaged children.
PubMed ID
28738913 View in PubMed
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Death by unnatural causes during childhood and early adulthood in offspring of psychiatric inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78557
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;64(3):345-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Webb Roger T
Pickles Andrew R
Appleby Louis
Mortensen Preben B
Abel Kathryn M
Author Affiliation
Centre for Women's Mental Health Research and Biostatistics Group, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, England. roger.webb@manchester.ac.uk
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;64(3):345-52
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death
Child
Child Mortality
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Mortality
Peer Group
Risk factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
CONTEXT: Offspring of psychiatric inpatients are at higher risk of death from all causes, but their cause-specific risks have not been quantified. OBJECTIVE: To investigate cause-specific deaths at 1 to 25 years in offspring of parents previously admitted as psychiatric inpatients. DESIGN: Population-based cohort study. SETTING: The entire Danish population. PARTICIPANTS: All singleton births (N = 1.38 million) from January 1, 1973, to December 31, 1997, with follow-up to January 1, 1999. Linkage to the national psychiatric register identified all previous parental admissions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Deaths from all natural causes and all unnatural causes, specifically, accidents, homicides, suicides, and undetermined causes. RESULTS: The highest observed relative risk (RR) was for homicide in young and older children with affected mothers or fathers. Homicides were between 5 and 10 times more likely to occur in this group, according to child's age and whether the mother or father had been admitted. There was previous parental admission in approximately one third of all child homicides. We found no evidence of increased risk of homicide in exposed young adults, but this group had a 2-fold to 3-fold higher risk of suicide. In almost one fourth of the suicides, there was a history of parental admission. Young adults with 2 previously admitted parents were 6 times more likely to kill themselves than were their peers in the general population. Relative risk of suicide or open-verdict deaths by poisoning were higher than for such deaths occurring by other means. CONCLUSIONS: Almost 99% of children studied survived to their mid-20s. However, they were more vulnerable to death from unnatural causes, notably, homicide during childhood and suicide in early adulthood. Further research is needed to establish how parental psychopathology contributes to increased risk of premature death in these offspring.
PubMed ID
17339523 View in PubMed
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Do eating disorders in parents predict eating disorders in children? Evidence from a Swedish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270281
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2015 Jul;132(1):51-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
H. Bould
U. Sovio
I. Koupil
C. Dalman
N. Micali
G. Lewis
C. Magnusson
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2015 Jul;132(1):51-9
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Feeding and Eating Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated whether parental eating disorders (ED) predict ED in children, using a large multigeneration register-based sample.
We used a subset of the Stockholm Youth Cohort born 1984-1995 and resident in Stockholm County in 2001-2007 (N = 286,232), The exposure was a diagnosed eating disorder in a parent; the outcome was any eating disorder diagnosis in their offspring, given by a specialist clinician, or inferred from an appointment at a specialist eating disorder clinic. A final study sample of 158,697 (55.4%) had data on these variables and confounding factors and contributed a total of 886,241 person years to the analysis.
We found good evidence in support of the hypothesis that ED in either parent are independently associated with ED in their female children (HR 1.97 (95% CI: 1.17-3.33), P = 0.01) and that ED in mothers are independently associated with ED in their female children (HR 2.35 (95% CI: 1.39-3.97) P = 0.001). Numbers were too low to permit separate analysis of ED in parents and their male children.
Eating disorders in parents were associated with ED in children. This study adds to our knowledge about the intergenerational transmission of ED, which will help identify high-risk groups and brings about the possibility of targeted prevention.
PubMed ID
25572654 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.