Skip header and navigation

Refine By

119 records – page 1 of 12.

A 5-year follow-up study of suicide attempts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46467
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
E. Johnsson Fridell
A. Ojehagen
L. Träskman-Bendz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Cause of Death
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Depressive Disorder - mortality - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Seventy-five patients were admitted to the ward of the Lund Suicide Research Center following a suicide attempt. After 5 years, the patients were followed up by a personal semistructured interview covering sociodemographic, psychosocial and psychiatric areas. Ten patients (13%) had committed suicide during the follow-up period, the majority within 2 years. They tended to be older at the index attempt admission, and most of them had a mood disorder in comparison with the others. Two patients had died from somatic diseases. Forty-two patients were interviewed, of whom 17 (40%) had reattempted during the follow-up period, most of them within 3 years. Predictors for reattempt were young age, personality disorder, parents having received treatment for psychiatric disorder, and a poor social network. At the index attempt, none of the reattempters had diagnoses of adjustment disorders or anxiety disorders. At follow-up, reattempters had more psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90), and their overall functioning (GAF) was poor compared to those who did not reattempt. All of the reattempters had long-lasting treatment ( > 3 years) as compared to 56% of the others. It is of great clinical importance to focus on treatment strategies for the vulnerable subgroup of self-destructive reattempters.
PubMed ID
8739657 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adulthood mortality of infants isolated at birth due to tuberculosis in the family.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31077
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(1):69-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Juha M Veijola
Pirjo H Mäki
Matti I Joukamaa
Esa Läärä
Helinä Hakko
Markku M Nieminen
Matti K Isohanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland. jveijola@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(1):69-72
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
BCG Vaccine - administration & dosage
Cause of Death
Child Custody
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Family Health
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Nurseries
Patient Isolation
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberculosis - prevention & control
Abstract
AIMS: In 1936 the Finnish Anti-Tuberculosis Association founded the first nursery, "Joulumerkkikoti", into which infants born into tuberculous families were admitted and given BCG vaccination to reduce the risk of tuberculosis. This prophylactic regimen was effective in reducing infant mortality and morbidity of tuberculosis. We investigated the mortality of these children later in childhood and adulthood. METHODS: The index cohort consisted of 3,020 subjects born between 1945 and 1965 in Finland and isolated from their family immediately after birth. The average separation time was 218 days. The subjects alive on 1 January 1971 were identified. For every index subject two reference subjects were chosen, the matching criteria being sex, year, and place of birth. Data on causes of deaths were obtained from the Finnish Cause of Death Registry by the end of 1998. RESULTS: The relative mortality rate (RR) was higher in the index cohort than in the reference cohort for all causes of death (RR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.7), and particularly for unnatural deaths: RR 1.5 (1.1-1.9) for men and RR 1.9 (1.0-3.7) for women. CONCLUSIONS: The mortality in the index subjects later in childhood and adulthood was somewhat elevated. This may be explained by a variety of risks experienced during pregnancy, delivery, and childhood. The fall in the socioeconomic status of the family of origin due to tuberculosis may partially explain the result. Another interpretation is that the very early separation from the mother had unfavourable effects on later psychological developments in some children.
PubMed ID
12623528 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anticipation in unipolar affective disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35126
Source
J Affect Disord. 1995 Oct 9;35(1-2):31-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-1995
Author
C. Engström
A S Thornlund
E L Johansson
M. Långström
J. Chotai
R. Adolfsson
P O Nylander
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Affect Disord. 1995 Oct 9;35(1-2):31-40
Date
Oct-9-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - genetics - mortality - psychology
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Life tables
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Trinucleotide Repeats
Abstract
Anticipation describes an inheritance pattern within a pedigree with an increase in disease severity and/or decrease in age at onset in successive generations. The phenomenon of anticipation has recently been shown to be correlated with the expansion of trinucleotide repeat sequences in a neuromuscular disease, various neurodegenerative disorders and mental retardation. We have studied parent-offspring differences in age at onset and disease severity in 31 pairs with unilineal inheritance of unipolar affective disorder (UPAD). Life-table analyses showed a significant decrease in survival to 1st episode of major depression in the offspring generation compared with the parental generation (P = 0.0007). There was also a significant difference in age at onset (P
PubMed ID
8557885 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A serious challenge for youth protection services: intervening with parents suffering from borderline personality disorder (BPD)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155153
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2007;32(2):97-114
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Lise Laporte
Author Affiliation
Chercheure à l'Institut de recherche pour le développement social des jeunes (IRDS), Institut de recherche du Centre jeunesse de Montréal-Institut universitaire et au département de psychiatrie du Centre universitaire de santé McGill (CUSM).
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2007;32(2):97-114
Date
2007
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - psychology
Child Welfare
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Countertransference (Psychology)
Education
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Quebec
Social Adjustment
Social Work
Abstract
An exploratory survey of 68 youth protection services' workers in Montréal, who followed 1,030 children reveals that 39 % of these children have at least one parent who suffer from mental health problems. Among these parents, 48 % of mothers and 30 % of fathers have a personality disorder, and for the majority, a borderline personality disorder. This mental health problem is preoccupying for youth protection workers because of its high prevalence, its impact on children and case workers and the difficulties brought forth by having to intervene in a context of authority and within an organization not adapted to the management of this mental health problem. Some intervention's guidelines to work with these parents are presented as well as some challenges and future perspectives.
PubMed ID
18797543 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between parental hearing impairment and children's mental health: Results from the Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275197
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2015 Dec;147:252-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Ingrid Borren
Kristian Tambs
Kristin Gustavson
Helga Ask
Bo Engdahl
Jon Martin Sundet
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2015 Dec;147:252-60
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health - standards
Mothers - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Persons With Hearing Impairments
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Some previous studies indicate that parental hearing loss may have negative consequences in the parent-child relationship. However, most of these studies are qualitative or have apparent methodological shortcomings.
This study is the first of its kind conducted in a large population-based sample with audiometrically measured hearing loss aimed at investigating the extent to which parental hearing loss affects adolescents' mental health.
Questionnaires were administered to the adult (>19 years) and adolescent (age 13-19 years) population of Nord-Trøndelag county, Norway (1995-97), which collected information on mental and somatic health, including hearing loss. For adults participating in the study, pure tone audiometry tests were also administered. In total, 4047 fathers and 4785 mothers with self-reported hearing loss data were identified. The corresponding numbers with measured hearing loss data included 4079 fathers and 4861 mothers. The associations between the degrees of self-reported or measured parental hearing loss and the mental health of their adolescent, measured by Hopkins Symptom Check List (SCL) 5, were estimated using generalized estimating equations. After adjusting for several covariates, the mental health symptoms of adolescents were compared by parental hearing loss (i.e., with versus without hearing loss).
Adolescents whose mothers had severe measured or self-reported hearing loss had significantly worse mental health than their counterparts whose mothers did not have a hearing loss. No corresponding effects were found in the adolescents whose mothers had only a slight/moderate hearing loss, neither measured nor self-reported. Paternal slight/moderate self-reported hearing loss was associated with a small significant reduction of mental health in the adolescents, although attenuated when adjusting for paternal distress. No significant effects were detected in the adolescents whose fathers had measured hearing loss.
Severe maternal hearing loss is associated with significantly increased adolescent distress.
PubMed ID
26605969 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bipolar disorder and parental psychopathology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264499
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Dec;49(12):1973-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Dan Sucksdorff
Roshan Chudal
Auli Suominen
Elina Jokiranta
Alan S Brown
Andre Sourander
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Dec;49(12):1973-84
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental disorders
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders
Odds Ratio
Parents - psychology
Registries
Schizophrenia
Young Adult
Abstract
Few population-based studies have examined the association between parental psychopathology and bipolar disorder (BPD) in offspring. One limitation is lack of control for potential confounding by indicators of parental socio-economic status or maternal smoking during pregnancy. Furthermore, none of them included analyses restricted to parental diagnoses received prior to the birth of the offspring. Associations could not be affected by child-related factors affecting the parent in such analyses. This study explores associations between those parental psychiatric disorders diagnosed at any point of time as well as those diagnosed before offspring birth, and BPD in offspring.
In this nested case-control study, we identified 1,861 cases, age up to 25 years, 3,643 matched controls, and their parents from Finnish national registers. The associations were examined using conditional logistic regression, calculating odds ratios (OR) and adjusting for region of birth, parental age and education and mother's smoking during pregnancy.
Anytime diagnosed parental disorders associating with BPD in offspring (95% confidence interval) were BPD [OR (maternal) 5.2 (2.52-10.62); OR (paternal) 8.1 (3.77-17.26)], schizophrenia and related psychoses [OR (maternal) 3.1 (1.69-5.84); OR (paternal) 4.5 (1.97-10.27)], other affective disorders [OR (maternal) 3.0 (2.08-4.21); OR (paternal) 3.0 (1.97-4.47)] and maternal anxiety disorders OR 2.6 (1.08-6.42). Statistically significant associations were also found for parental schizophrenia and related psychoses, and other affective disorders, diagnosed before offspring birth.
BPD is associated with many parental psychiatric disorders, particularly BPD and schizophrenia and related psychoses. The associations must be partially due to child-independent factors. Covariate adjustments had only a minor impact on the associations.
PubMed ID
24791657 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer families with children: factors associated with family functioning--a comparative study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162623
Source
Psychooncology. 2008 Apr;17(4):363-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
F. Schmitt
P. Santalahti
S. Saarelainen
E. Savonlahti
G. Romer
J. Piha
Author Affiliation
Child Psychiatry Clinic, Turku University Hospital, Finland. florence.schmitt@tyks.fi
Source
Psychooncology. 2008 Apr;17(4):363-72
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Affect
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Communication
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Family Relations
Fathers - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Neoplasms - psychology
Parenting - psychology
Personality Assessment
Personality Inventory
Problem Solving
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The objective is to examine the factors associated with family functioning in families with children where a parent has cancer in comparison to families without cancer.
Eighty-five families including 85 cancer patients, 61 healthy spouses and 68 children between 11 and 17 years of age, and a control group of 59 families including 105 adults and 65 children were given a set of questionnaires including a background variable questionnaire, the Family Assessment Device, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Sense of Coherence (SOC). A statistical multilevel model allowing the use of data from several informants belonging to the same family was constructed for the analysis of associations between variables.
Maternal depression and SOC of family members were associated with family functioning; maternal depression impaired family functioning and family members' SOC improved it. No difference was found between the clinical group and the control group.
In clinical work with cancer families with children, maternal depression and SOC should be focused on.
PubMed ID
17614096 View in PubMed
Less detail

Case report of a female-to-male transsexual homicide offender.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222638
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 1992 Dec;26(4):661-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
J M Lawrence
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Queensland.
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 1992 Dec;26(4):661-5
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - genetics - psychology
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Homicide - psychology
Humans
Personality Development
Psychosexual Development
Social Environment
Transsexualism - psychology
Violence
Abstract
A 22 year old female-to-male half-Aboriginal transsexual had been exposed to gross neglect and violence, separation and inconsistent cultural supports during childhood. Her mother had also been convicted of homicide in a context of alcohol and violence. Transsexual identification, antisocial behaviours, self mutilation, substance abuse and unmet dependency needs were evident from childhood or early adolescence. The killing was a confrontational peer group stabbing in a brawl under influence of alcohol--the male mode of homicide. This is the first known case in world literature of a female-to-male transsexual guilty of homicide.
PubMed ID
1476532 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in children's behavior and costs for service use associated with parents' response to treatment for dysthymia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171070
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Feb;45(2):239-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Carolyn Byrne
Gina Browne
Jacqueline Roberts
Michael Mills
Barbara Bell
Amiram Gafni
Ellen Jamieson
Michelle Webb
Author Affiliation
University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oshawa, ON, Canada.
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Feb;45(2):239-46
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - economics - epidemiology
Child Health Services - economics
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Child, Preschool
Dysthymic Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Expenditures
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Social Work - economics
Abstract
This study examined differences in children's behavior and expenditures for health and social services used when their parents with dysthymia did or did not respond to antidepressant therapy.
Children ages 4 to 16 years of consenting parents enrolled in a treatment trial for dysthymia who did and did not respond to treatment were compared at baseline and 24 months. The responder was a parent with at least a 40% reduction in his or her baseline depressive symptoms using the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Children's behavior was measured using the Child Behavior Checklist, and expenditures for health and social services use was measured in Canadian dollars using the Health and Social Service Utilization Questionnaire.
Children of parents with dysthymia who responded to treatment had significantly greater reductions in emotional symptoms at 2-year follow-up than children of nonresponders, along with an economically important (not statistically significant) reduction in expenditures for health and social services use.
Reductions in parental symptoms of dysthymia may be associated with reductions in childhood behavioral problems and in expenditures for the child's use of services.
PubMed ID
16429095 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characteristics of violent alcoholics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11539
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1994 Jul;29(4):451-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
B. Bergman
B. Brismar
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 1994 Jul;29(4):451-7
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Development
Risk factors
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Suicide - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Sweden
Temperance - psychology
Violence
Abstract
This study is based on interviews with 53 male alcoholics. Its purpose was to study the relationship between childhood conditions, history of alcohol and drug misuse and assaultive and suicidal behaviour. Fifty-seven per cent of the alcoholics reported a history of violent behaviour. Hidden violence, often towards women, was common. One-third of the violent patients had a history of attempted suicide compared to 17% in the non-violent group. The assaultive alcoholics also had a more violent childhood, a higher proportion of fathers with alcohol problems and had started drinking earlier in life. Drug addiction was much more common in this group too. We find support for our hypothesis that there is a positive correlation between violence in the parental home and assaultive and suicidal behaviour and drug misuse later in life. When violent and non-violent alcoholics are compared many of the same characteristics appear as when suicidal and non-suicidal and type 2 and type 1 alcoholics are compared. This study raises the question of adding attempted suicide as a characteristic of the type 2 alcoholic.
PubMed ID
7986283 View in PubMed
Less detail

119 records – page 1 of 12.