Skip header and navigation

Refine By

80 records – page 1 of 8.

Adolescent gambling: relationships with parent gambling and parenting practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176754
Source
Psychol Addict Behav. 2004 Dec;18(4):398-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Julie Vachon
Frank Vitaro
Brigitte Wanner
Richard E Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Research Unit on Children's Psycho-Social Maladjustment, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. julie.vachon@umontreal.ca
Source
Psychol Addict Behav. 2004 Dec;18(4):398-401
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Female
Gambling - psychology
Humans
Male
Models, Statistical
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Abstract
This study explored the possible links between family risk factors (i.e., parent gambling and parenting practices) and adolescent gambling. A community sample of 938 adolescents (496 females and 442 males) completed the South Oaks Gambling Screen Revised for Adolescents (SOGS-RA; K. C. Winters, R. Stinchfield, & J. Fulkerson, 1993b) along with a questionnaire assessing parenting practices. Both parents completed the SOGS (H. R. Lesieur & S. B. Blume, 1987). Results showed that adolescent gambling frequency was related to both parents' gambling frequency and problems. However, adolescent gambling problems were linked only to fathers' severity of gambling problems. Low levels of parental monitoring enhanced adolescents' risk of getting involved in gambling activities and developing related problems. A higher level of inadequate disciplinary practices was also related to greater gambling problems in youth. These links were significant after controlling for socioeconomic status, gender, and impulsivity-hyperactivity problems.
PubMed ID
15631615 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adulthood mortality of infants isolated at birth due to tuberculosis in the family.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31077
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(1):69-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Juha M Veijola
Pirjo H Mäki
Matti I Joukamaa
Esa Läärä
Helinä Hakko
Markku M Nieminen
Matti K Isohanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland. jveijola@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(1):69-72
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
BCG Vaccine - administration & dosage
Cause of Death
Child Custody
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Family Health
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Nurseries
Patient Isolation
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberculosis - prevention & control
Abstract
AIMS: In 1936 the Finnish Anti-Tuberculosis Association founded the first nursery, "Joulumerkkikoti", into which infants born into tuberculous families were admitted and given BCG vaccination to reduce the risk of tuberculosis. This prophylactic regimen was effective in reducing infant mortality and morbidity of tuberculosis. We investigated the mortality of these children later in childhood and adulthood. METHODS: The index cohort consisted of 3,020 subjects born between 1945 and 1965 in Finland and isolated from their family immediately after birth. The average separation time was 218 days. The subjects alive on 1 January 1971 were identified. For every index subject two reference subjects were chosen, the matching criteria being sex, year, and place of birth. Data on causes of deaths were obtained from the Finnish Cause of Death Registry by the end of 1998. RESULTS: The relative mortality rate (RR) was higher in the index cohort than in the reference cohort for all causes of death (RR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.7), and particularly for unnatural deaths: RR 1.5 (1.1-1.9) for men and RR 1.9 (1.0-3.7) for women. CONCLUSIONS: The mortality in the index subjects later in childhood and adulthood was somewhat elevated. This may be explained by a variety of risks experienced during pregnancy, delivery, and childhood. The fall in the socioeconomic status of the family of origin due to tuberculosis may partially explain the result. Another interpretation is that the very early separation from the mother had unfavourable effects on later psychological developments in some children.
PubMed ID
12623528 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A serious challenge for youth protection services: intervening with parents suffering from borderline personality disorder (BPD)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155153
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2007;32(2):97-114
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Lise Laporte
Author Affiliation
Chercheure à l'Institut de recherche pour le développement social des jeunes (IRDS), Institut de recherche du Centre jeunesse de Montréal-Institut universitaire et au département de psychiatrie du Centre universitaire de santé McGill (CUSM).
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2007;32(2):97-114
Date
2007
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - psychology
Child Welfare
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Countertransference (Psychology)
Education
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Quebec
Social Adjustment
Social Work
Abstract
An exploratory survey of 68 youth protection services' workers in Montréal, who followed 1,030 children reveals that 39 % of these children have at least one parent who suffer from mental health problems. Among these parents, 48 % of mothers and 30 % of fathers have a personality disorder, and for the majority, a borderline personality disorder. This mental health problem is preoccupying for youth protection workers because of its high prevalence, its impact on children and case workers and the difficulties brought forth by having to intervene in a context of authority and within an organization not adapted to the management of this mental health problem. Some intervention's guidelines to work with these parents are presented as well as some challenges and future perspectives.
PubMed ID
18797543 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer families with children: factors associated with family functioning--a comparative study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162623
Source
Psychooncology. 2008 Apr;17(4):363-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
F. Schmitt
P. Santalahti
S. Saarelainen
E. Savonlahti
G. Romer
J. Piha
Author Affiliation
Child Psychiatry Clinic, Turku University Hospital, Finland. florence.schmitt@tyks.fi
Source
Psychooncology. 2008 Apr;17(4):363-72
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Affect
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Communication
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Family Relations
Fathers - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Neoplasms - psychology
Parenting - psychology
Personality Assessment
Personality Inventory
Problem Solving
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The objective is to examine the factors associated with family functioning in families with children where a parent has cancer in comparison to families without cancer.
Eighty-five families including 85 cancer patients, 61 healthy spouses and 68 children between 11 and 17 years of age, and a control group of 59 families including 105 adults and 65 children were given a set of questionnaires including a background variable questionnaire, the Family Assessment Device, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Sense of Coherence (SOC). A statistical multilevel model allowing the use of data from several informants belonging to the same family was constructed for the analysis of associations between variables.
Maternal depression and SOC of family members were associated with family functioning; maternal depression impaired family functioning and family members' SOC improved it. No difference was found between the clinical group and the control group.
In clinical work with cancer families with children, maternal depression and SOC should be focused on.
PubMed ID
17614096 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caregiving by teens for family members with Huntington disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150785
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2009 Aug;15(3):273-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Janet K Williams
Lioness Ayres
Janet Specht
Kathleen Sparbel
Mary Lou Klimek
Author Affiliation
The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. janet-williams@uiowa.edu
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2009 Aug;15(3):273-94
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Decision Making
Female
Focus Groups
Human Development
Humans
Huntington Disease - nursing
Male
Social Support
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this report is to describe caregiving by teens for family members with Huntington disease (HD). Thirty-two teens in HD families in the United States and Canada participated in focus groups from 2002 to 2005 in a study to identify concerns and strategies to manage concerns. An unexpected finding was 24 (77%) described caregiving activities. Descriptive analysis of caregiving statements identified themes of Tasks and Responsibilities, Subjective Burden, Caregiving in Context of Personal Risk for HD, and Decisional Responsibility. Teens took an active part in nearly all aspects of care with the exception of contacting health care providers and attending doctors' appointments. Some described emotional distress, and many provided care knowing they had the potential to develop HD. Teens recognized the need for decisions but lacked the authority to make these decisions. Findings may be relevant for other teens who strive to meet caregiver and student roles and developmental tasks.
PubMed ID
19465560 View in PubMed
Less detail

Challenges of parenting for families living with HIV/AIDS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194866
Source
Soc Work. 2001 Apr;46(2):159-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
B J Antle
L M Wells
R S Goldie
D. DeMatteo
S M King
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Soc Work. 2001 Apr;46(2):159-69
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Female
Grief
HIV Infections - psychology
Humans
Male
Parenting
Stereotyping
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Given the continual rise of HIV infection in our communities and the improved life span for many who are HIV-positive, social workers in all fields of practice have clients whose lives have been touched by HIV/AIDS. This article reviews relevant literature and reports on the parenting needs that emerged in a Canadian study that examined the experiences of 105 mothers and fathers living with HIV/AIDS. The majority of the children in the study were not HIV-positive. Some themes related to parenting in the literature, and evident in this study, were chronic sorrow, stress and burden, normalization, stigma, secrecy, and disclosure. In the study parenting was found to be a source of joy and an additional challenge in an already complicated life. Important new themes were family life as precious time, focused parenting, the different effects of HIV/AIDS, the parenting preparation needs of fathers, and the efforts to parent affected and infected children differently. Parenting when living with HIV/AIDS requires attention from clinicians and researchers in a range of settings.
PubMed ID
11329645 View in PubMed
Less detail

Change in adolescents' internalizing symptomatology as a function of sex and the timing of maternal depressive symptomatology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157893
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;47(4):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Jennifer M Jenkins
Tracey Curwen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Development and Applied Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. jenny.jenkins@utoronto.ca
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;47(4):399-405
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mothers - psychology
Parenting - psychology
Personality Inventory
Sex Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine change in internalizing symptoms from late childhood (age 10) into mid-adolescence (age 15) in a nationally representative sample of Canadian children. The roles of a child's sex, maternal depressive symptoms in late childhood, and their interactions were investigated.
The sample was derived from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. Mothers reported on their own depressive symptoms and children reported on their own internalizing symptoms at three time (T) points (T1: 1994/1995; T2: 1996/1997; T3: 1998/1999). Change in children's internalizing symptoms was investigated using multiple regression.
Girls increased and boys decreased in their internalizing symptoms from T1 to T3. The effect of maternal depressive symptoms at T1 was moderated by sex and remained significant after controlling for maternal depressive symptoms at T2 and T3, with more adverse effects in girls.
The internalizing symptoms of girls increased from childhood to adolescence, whereas those for boys decreased. Female children exposed to maternal depressive symptoms T1 continued to show negative effects 4 years later.
PubMed ID
18388768 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in children's behavior and costs for service use associated with parents' response to treatment for dysthymia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171070
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Feb;45(2):239-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Carolyn Byrne
Gina Browne
Jacqueline Roberts
Michael Mills
Barbara Bell
Amiram Gafni
Ellen Jamieson
Michelle Webb
Author Affiliation
University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oshawa, ON, Canada.
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Feb;45(2):239-46
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - economics - epidemiology
Child Health Services - economics
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Child, Preschool
Dysthymic Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Expenditures
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Social Work - economics
Abstract
This study examined differences in children's behavior and expenditures for health and social services used when their parents with dysthymia did or did not respond to antidepressant therapy.
Children ages 4 to 16 years of consenting parents enrolled in a treatment trial for dysthymia who did and did not respond to treatment were compared at baseline and 24 months. The responder was a parent with at least a 40% reduction in his or her baseline depressive symptoms using the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Children's behavior was measured using the Child Behavior Checklist, and expenditures for health and social services use was measured in Canadian dollars using the Health and Social Service Utilization Questionnaire.
Children of parents with dysthymia who responded to treatment had significantly greater reductions in emotional symptoms at 2-year follow-up than children of nonresponders, along with an economically important (not statistically significant) reduction in expenditures for health and social services use.
Reductions in parental symptoms of dysthymia may be associated with reductions in childhood behavioral problems and in expenditures for the child's use of services.
PubMed ID
16429095 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood motor coordination and adult schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149649
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;166(9):1041-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Jason Schiffman
Holger J Sorensen
Justin Maeda
Erik L Mortensen
Jeff Victoroff
Kentaro Hayashi
Niels M Michelsen
Morten Ekstrom
Sarnoff Mednick
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA. schiffma@umbc.edu
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;166(9):1041-7
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Basal Ganglia - physiopathology
Cerebellum - physiopathology
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - genetics
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Neurologic Examination
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
The authors examined whether motor coordination difficulties assessed in childhood predict later adult schizophrenia spectrum outcomes.
A standardized childhood neurological examination was administered to a sample of 265 Danish children in 1972, when participants were 10-13 years old. Adult diagnostic information was available for 244 members of the sample. Participants fell into three groups: children whose mothers or fathers had a psychiatric hospital diagnosis of schizophrenia (N=94); children who had at least one parent with a psychiatric record of hospitalization for a nonpsychotic disorder (N=84); and children with no parental records of psychiatric hospitalization (N=66). Psychiatric outcomes of the offspring were assessed through psychiatric interviews in 1992 when participants were 31-33 years of age, as well as through a scan of national psychiatric registers completed in May 2007.
Children who later developed a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (N=32) displayed significantly higher scores on a scale of coordination deficits compared with those who did not develop a mental illness in this category (N=133).
Results from this study provide further support for the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia and underscore the potential role of cerebellar and/or basal ganglia abnormalities in the etiology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia.
Notes
Cites: Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2005 Aug;181(1):179-8715830237
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2005 Oct;31(4):962-7715958818
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;162(12):2337-4316330599
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2006 Jan 31;81(2-3):253-6016242918
Cites: Neurosci Lett. 2006 May 8;398(3):189-9416469446
Cites: Psychopathology. 2006;39(6):269-7616960465
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2007 May 15;61(10):1179-8617188254
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2000 Jun 16;43(2-3):109-1610858629
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2000;26(2):367-7810885637
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2000 Sep;157(9):1416-2210964857
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 2000 Spring;97(1):65-7110813806
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2002 Feb;159(2):238-4311823265
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2002 Oct 1;57(2-3):281-9112223260
Cites: Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 2002 Sep;43:s50-712271801
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 Nov;37(11):527-3112395142
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2007 Aug;94(1-3):64-7317512173
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2007 Aug;94(1-3):37-4417543502
Cites: Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2008 Jul;32(5):957-7118462797
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2008 Jul 15;64(2):81-818395701
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2009 Mar;35(2):415-2418791074
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2003 Apr 1;60(2-3):239-5812591587
Cites: Brain. 2004 Jan;127(Pt 1):143-5314570821
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2004 Jul;110(1):29-3515180777
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2004 Nov;161(11):2021-715514402
Cites: Soc Biol. 1971 Sep;18:S103-135125943
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1985 Aug;42(8):753-614015319
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 1987;13(3):425-383629198
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 1989 Mar;27(3):335-502710870
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 1991 Jan;33(1):55-681704864
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1993 Jan-Mar;27(1):39-548515388
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 1994;20(3):441-517526446
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 1995 Mar 27;56(2):183-2047667443
Cites: Neuropsychology. 1998 Jul;12(3):426-459673998
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1999 May;56(5):457-6310232301
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1999 Aug;56(8):741-810435609
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 1999 Oct 1;46(7):908-2010509174
Cites: J Psychiatry Neurosci. 1999 Sep;24(4):304-1410516797
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2005 Jan 1;72(2-3):151-6015560960
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2005 Jul;47(7):437-4215991862
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 2005 Dec 30;140(3):239-5016288852
PubMed ID
19605535 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood predictors of future psychiatric morbidity in offspring of mothers with psychotic disorder: results from the Helsinki High-Risk Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176373
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;186:108-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Lauri T Niemi
Jaana M Suvisaari
Jari K Haukka
Jouko K Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. laura.niemi@ktl.fi
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;186:108-14
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Developmental Disabilities - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Mental Disorders - etiology
Psychotic Disorders
Schizophrenia
Abstract
The Helsinki High-Risk Study monitors women treated for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders in Helsinki mental hospitals before 1975, their offspring, and controls.
To compare the development of high-risk and control group children, and investigate which factors predicted future psychiatric disorders.
We examined information from childhood and school health record cards of 159 high-risk and 99 control group offspring. Logistic regression was used to assess whether developmental abnormalities predicted later mental disorders.
Compared with controls, children in the high-risk group had more emotional symptoms before school age, attentional problems and social inhibition at school age, and neurological soft signs throughout. In this group pre-school social adjustment problems (OR=9.7, 95% CI 1.8-51.8) or severe neurological symptoms (Fisher's test, P=0.006) predicted future schizophrenia-spectrum disorder. Social adjustment problems and emotional symptoms during school age predicted future non-psychotic psychiatric disorders.
Our study supports the validity of neurological, emotional, social and behavioural markers as vulnerability indicators of psychotic and other mental disorders, particularly among children genetically at high risk of psychosis.
PubMed ID
15684232 View in PubMed
Less detail

80 records – page 1 of 8.