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Child custody disputes within the context of child protection investigations: secondary analysis of the Canadian Incident Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107692
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(1):115-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Michael A Saini
Tara Black
Barbara Fallon
Alena Marshall
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
Child Welfare. 2013;92(1):115-37
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Child Abuse, Sexual - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Child Custody - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Child Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dissent and Disputes - legislation & jurisprudence
Divorce - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Domestic Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Referral and Consultation - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This national study of child custody disputes within the context of child protection investigations confirms and reinforces the perception in the field that child custody disputes are more likely to reopen for investigations, include higher rates of malicious referrals and involve a higher proportion of children with emotional and functioning issues compared to non-custody-related investigations. Future research might consider the reasons for these higher rates so to improve the identification of these cases and to make more informed decisions about how best to respond to these families. The greatest contribution of this study is that it provides important new evidence to reinforce the need to prioritize child custody disputes within the context of child protection services given the unique challenges and opportunities for making well-informed case plan decisions.
PubMed ID
23984488 View in PubMed
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Continuum of readiness for collaboration, ICWA compliance, and reducing disproportionality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115996
Source
Child Welfare. 2012;91(3):65-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tom Lidot
Rose-Margaret Orrantia
Miryam J Choca
Author Affiliation
American Indian Enhancement Project.
Source
Child Welfare. 2012;91(3):65-87
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
California
Child
Child Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Healthcare Disparities - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Minority Groups - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Social Work - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
From 2008-2010, a California Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC) addressed the disproportionality of African American and American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children in public child welfare services in partnership with the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Casey Family Program, the Child and Family Policy Institute of California, and the California Department of Social Services. The result was the development of the Continuum of Readiness, to be utilized by California counties to make strategic decisions to achieve Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) compliance and address AI/AN dis-proportionality through collaboration with tribes and urban Indian communities.
PubMed ID
23444790 View in PubMed
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Evidence-based practice in group care: the effects of policy, research, and organizational practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130968
Source
Child Welfare. 2011;90(1):93-113
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Carol Stuart
Larry Sanders
Maria Gurevich
Robert Fulton
Author Affiliation
Ryerson University.
Source
Child Welfare. 2011;90(1):93-113
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection - methods - statistics & numerical data
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Group Homes - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Ontario
Reproducibility of Results
Research - statistics & numerical data
Research Design
Abstract
This article describes the effect of a province-wide vision of evidence-based and outcome-based services for children and youth and the challenges of implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) and evidence-based treatment (EBT) approaches within group care settings. The paper is based on the results of a survey of group care settings in the province of Ontario, Canada, which was designed to understand the factors affecting the use of EBP and EBT. The critical roles of policy, access to research, and organizational structure as they affect the frontline workforce were explored. The results identified key differences between programs who implemented an evidence-based approach and those who are struggling to do so. Differences in case management practices as well as organizational factors affect the program's ability to use an evidence-based approach.
PubMed ID
21950177 View in PubMed
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Findings from a national needs assessment of American Indian/Alaska native child welfare programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115997
Source
Child Welfare. 2012;91(3):47-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Robin Leake
Cathryn Potter
Nancy Lucero
Jerry Gardner
Kathy Deserly
Author Affiliation
Butler Institute, University of Denver, USA.
Source
Child Welfare. 2012;91(3):47-63
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption - legislation & jurisprudence
Alaska
Child
Child Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Cultural Competency - legislation & jurisprudence
Culture
Foster Home Care - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Minority Groups - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Social Work - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The National Child Welfare Resource Center for Tribes, a member of the Children's Bureau Child Welfare Training and Technical Assistance Network, conducted a national needs assessment of tribal child welfare. This assessment explored current practices in tribal child welfare to identify unique systemic strengths and challenges. A culturally based, multi-method design yielded findings in five areas: tribal child welfare practice, foster care and adoption, the Indian Child Welfare Act, legal and judicial, and program operations.
PubMed ID
23444789 View in PubMed
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Social disorganization and the profile of child welfare: Explaining child welfare activity by the community-level factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264897
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2014 Oct;38(10):1671-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Timo Harrikari
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2014 Oct;38(10):1671-82
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Child Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Foster Home Care - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Social Work - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This article addresses the question of the structure of local child welfare activities in light of community-level factors. It poses the following research questions: how are different community-level factors related to child welfare client structures in communities and what is the extent to which these factors explain structural differences? The applied theoretical framework is based on social disorganization and strain theories as well as human developmental approach. The data has been collected from two Finnish national databases and it consists of variables containing 257 Finnish municipalities. The method of analysis is multinomial logistic regression. The results suggest that the local child welfare structures are tied to social disorganization, policing and culture as well as to the intensity of control in the communities. In general, the more fragile the communal structures, the more last-resort child welfare there is in the community. Combining fragile communal structures with weak dependency ratio and high proportion of social workers, the more intense the level of child welfare statistics indicated. The results indicate that the theoretical framework for the application of child welfare activity analysis is justified, but they also suggest that it requires further development through both context-bound reflection and application.
PubMed ID
25082431 View in PubMed
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