Skip header and navigation

Refine By

209 records – page 1 of 21.

"A baby show means work in the hardest sense": the better baby contests of the Vancouver and New Westminster Local Councils of Women, 1913-1929.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166649
Source
B C Stud. 2000-01;128:5-36
Publication Type
Article
Source
Int J Addict. 1982 Jul;17(5):749-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1982
Author
M. Penning
G E Barnes
Source
Int J Addict. 1982 Jul;17(5):749-91
Date
Jul-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Age Factors
Canada
Cannabis
Child Rearing
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Models, Psychological
Peer Group
Religion
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sibling Relations
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
The adolescent marijuana literature is reviewed. Studies show that the prevalence of marijuana use is generally quite low in elementary schools. In junior and senior high samples, findings vary greatly from place to place. The prevalence of use increased dramatically during the 1970s although the use patterns may have peaked already in some areas. The use of marijuana increases with age, but some evidence suggests that a slight drop-off in use occurs near the end of high school. Female use seems to be increasing more than male use. Use seems to be somewhat more prevalent in middle- and upper-middle-class homes and in broken homes. Mixed support has been found for the hypothesis that marijuana users have parents that are more permissive. Parents of marijuana users are generally characterized as being less warm and supportive, and more inclined toward the use of drugs themselves. Peer and sibling use of marijuana seem to be particularly important predictors of adolescent marijuana use. Findings on personality characteristics of marijuana users are not extensive and are somewhat contradictory. There is some evidence that users tend to be somewhat alienated, external in their locus of control, and possibly higher on anxiety. Users are also characterized by a higher value on independence vs achievement and more positive attitudes toward marijuana use. Behavioral correlates of marijuana use include greater use of alcohol and other drugs, and poorer school performance.
PubMed ID
6752049 View in PubMed
Less detail

American Indian/Alaskan Native grandparents raising grandchildren: findings from the Census 2000 Supplementary Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5982
Source
Soc Work. 2005 Apr;50(2):131-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Esme Fuller-Thomson
Meredith Minkler
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, ON, Canada. esme.fuller.thomson@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Work. 2005 Apr;50(2):131-9
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alaska
Censuses
Child
Child care
Child Rearing - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Family - ethnology
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Intergenerational Relations - ethnology
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Welfare - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
This article documents the prevalence and national profile of American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) grandparents who are raising their grandchildren, based on data from the American Community Survey/Census 2000 Supplementary Survey. In 2000 there were estimated to be nearly 53,000 AI/AN grandparent caregivers age 45 and older in the United States. Almost half of the caregiving grandparents had been raising a grandchild for five years or longer. The findings reveal a portrait of grandparents committed to raising their grandchildren despite the fact that many were living in extreme poverty, with ill health, and with limited resources and services. One-third of grandparent caregivers were living below the poverty line, and only one-quarter of these were receiving public assistance. Even when compared with their noncaregiving AI/AN peers, grandparents raising grandchildren were disproportionately female, poor, living with a functional disability, and living in overcrowded conditions. Implications for social work practice are presented and recommendations for policy and research are discussed.
PubMed ID
15853190 View in PubMed
Less detail

And they did not know that they did not know.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241552
Source
AARN News Lett. 1983 Oct;39(9):1, 3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1983
Author
E. Nemetz
Source
AARN News Lett. 1983 Oct;39(9):1, 3
Date
Oct-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child Rearing
Culture
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant, Newborn
PubMed ID
6559022 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antisocial process screening device: validation on a Russian sample of juvenile delinquents with the emphasis on the role of personality and parental rearing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155198
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2008 Oct-Nov;31(5):438-46
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marie Väfors Fritz
Vladislav Ruchkin
Roman Koposov
Britt Af Klinteberg
Author Affiliation
Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2008 Oct-Nov;31(5):438-46
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - enzymology - epidemiology - psychology
Child Rearing
Comorbidity
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Memory
Parenting - psychology
Personality Assessment
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Russia - epidemiology
Violence
Abstract
The objectives of the present study were 1) to validate the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD) in a sample of Russian juvenile delinquents; 2) to examine subgroups of delinquents with higher versus lower levels of childhood problem behaviors with respect to the APSD subscales, personality traits, and parental rearing; and 3) to attempt to replicate the previous finding that the APSD subscale measuring callous/unemotional traits can differentiate subgroups of delinquents with different precursors for problem behaviors (predominantly biological versus predominantly social). A group of 250 Russian juvenile inmates (mean age=16.4) was examined by means of the APSD completed by the staff at the correctional institution. The inmates completed several self-reports assessing their current and childhood behavior problems, personality traits and experienced parental rearing practices. A factor structure of the APSD was obtained that is similar, albeit not identical, to that from the original studies by Frick and colleagues [Frick, P.J., O'Brien, B.S., Wootton, J.M., McBurnett, K., (1994). Psychopathy and conduct problems in children. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 103, 700-707]; [Frick, P.J., Barry, C.T., Bodin, S.D., (1999). Applying the concept of psychopathy to children: Implications for the Assessment of antisocial youth. In Gacono, C.B. (Ed), The clinical and forensic assessment of psychopathy: A practitioners guide. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum]; [Frick, P.J., Lilienfeld, S.O., Ellis, M., Loney, B., Silverthorn, P., (1999). The association between anxiety and psychopathy dimensions in children. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 27, 383-392]; callous unemotional traits in the present sample were expressed in manipulative behavior. Results further disclosed higher levels of antisocial and aggressive activities, higher levels of personality attributes such as narcissism and novelty seeking, as well as lower cooperativeness, and negatively perceived parental rearing in a subgroup with higher (versus lower) number of childhood symptoms of conduct disorder and oppositional disorder. The juvenile delinquents with higher levels as compared to lower levels of callous unemotional traits also perceived their parents as using more negative rearing strategies. The findings are discussed in terms of interactional processes between personality of the juvenile delinquents and parental rearing in the development of antisocial behavior.
PubMed ID
18790536 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appraisals of stress in child-rearing in Swedish mothers pre-schoolers with ADHD. A questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31274
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2002 Aug;11(4):185-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Christina Kadesjö
Hans Stenlund
Paul Wels
Christopher Gillberg
Bruno Hägglöf
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Umeå, Sweden. kadesjo@telia.com
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2002 Aug;11(4):185-95
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - psychology
Child
Child Rearing - psychology
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Dutch self-report questionnaire for measuring parental: i) subjective stress, ii) global appraisal of the child-rearing situation, iii) attribution of child-rearing outcomes, and iv) expectation for help was translated into Swedish and applied to mothers of two groups of 3- to 7-year-olds: one with DSM-IV ADHD (n = 131) and one without DSM-IV ADHD (n = 131). The suggested factor structure of the original Dutch report was tested with confirmatory analysis on data from the mothers of children with ADHD [131]. There was no perfect fit to the data, but close enough to judge the factors as applicable to this sample. Factor reliability testing was performed. Results indicated good psychometric properties. Highly significant differences on all the measures in the four different sections (i) through (iv) were found between the ADHD group and the comparison group. The questionnaire is suggested to be useful in clinical work and research projects on problematic child-rearing situations.
PubMed ID
12444428 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Apropos the Year of the Child: our attitude to migrants and their children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41350
Source
Sykepleien. 1979 Jun 5;66(8):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1979
Author
B. Saetersdal
Source
Sykepleien. 1979 Jun 5;66(8):20-2
Date
Jun-5-1979
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Child
Child Advocacy
Child Rearing
Culture
Family Characteristics
Humans
Norway
Transients and Migrants
PubMed ID
256271 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association of personality characteristics with parenting problems among alcoholic couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206216
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1998 Feb;24(1):119-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
W A Gallant
K M Gorey
M D Gallant
J L Perry
P K Ryan
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1998 Feb;24(1):119-29
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aftercare - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Child Rearing - psychology
Comorbidity
Empathy
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Parenting - psychology
Parents - education - psychology
Personality Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Abstract
This retrospective cross-sectional study explored the associations of personality characteristics with parenting problems among 25 couples, one or both members of which were identified as alcoholics by virtue of their voluntary past completion of a residential program for alcoholics. Most of them (90%) scored lower, indicating their more problematic parental attitudes and behaviors, on all four scales of the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory (AAPI: inappropriate parental expectations of children, lack empathy for children's needs, value physical punishment, and parent-child role reversal) than average "normal" nonalcoholic, nonabusive adults. Such parenting problems were found to be very highly associated with clients' personality characteristics. For example, schizoid, schizotypal, histrionic, and passive aggressive characteristics (DSM-III-R-based) along with a few other personal characteristics of the couples, accounted for nearly all (90.2%, R2 = .902) of their propensity to reverse roles with their children. Findings also suggested that the identified parenting problems among alcoholic couples are amenable to programmatic intervention: the longer couples had participated in aftercare programs offered by the treatment facility the more appropriate and empathetic was their parenting.
PubMed ID
9513633 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atomoxetine improves patient and family coping in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in Swedish children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150784
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Dec;18(12):725-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Pär Svanborg
Gunilla Thernlund
Per A Gustafsson
Bruno Hägglöf
Alexander Schacht
Björn Kadesjö
Author Affiliation
Eli Lilly Sweden AB, Box 721, 169 27 Solna, Sweden. svanborg_par@lilly.com
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Dec;18(12):725-35
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adaptation, Psychological - drug effects
Adrenergic Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - drug therapy - psychology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - psychology
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Child Rearing
Combined Modality Therapy
Cost of Illness
Double-Blind Method
Education
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Harm Reduction
Humans
Male
Parenting - psychology
Propylamines - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Quality of Life - psychology
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
This 10-week study assessed the efficacy of atomoxetine in combination with psychoeducation compared to placebo and psychoeducation in the improvement of Quality of Life in Swedish stimulant-naive children and adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. A total of 99 patients were treated with atomoxetine (49 patients) or placebo (50 patients) for 10 weeks and assessed regarding broader areas of functioning using the Quality of Life measures Child Health and Illness Profile-Child Edition (CHIP-CE), Family Strain Index [FSI; equivalent to the Family Burden of Illness Module used in the study], Appraisal of Stress in Child-Rearing (ASCR), Five to fifteen (FTF), "I think I am" ("Jag tycker jag är"), and Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) before and after the active treatment phase. Simultaneously, the patients' parents participated in a 4-session psychoeducation program. A statistically significant difference in favor of atomoxetine was seen in the improvement from baseline to study endpoint for the CHIP-CE domains "Achievement" and "Risk avoidance", for the FSI total score, for the ASCR section (I) domain "Child as a burden", for all FTF domains except for "Language and Speech", and for the CDRS-R total score. No difference between treatment groups was observed in the patient-assessed evaluation of self-esteem using the "I think I am" scale. Atomoxetine combined with psychoeducation had a positive effect on various everyday coping abilities of the patients as well as their families during 10 weeks of treatment, whereas the patients' self-image and the parents' image of the climate in the family were not significantly improved.
Notes
Cites: Qual Life Res. 1998 Jul;7(5):433-459691723
Cites: Psychopathology. 1999 Mar-Apr;32(2):81-9210026452
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004;2:6615555077
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2004;13 Suppl 3:23-3015692876
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2004;13 Suppl 3:3-1315692877
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 May;14(3):127-3715959658
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Jul;44(7):647-5515968233
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Sep;116(3):e364-916140679
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Feb;15(1):52-6016514510
Cites: Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2006 Nov;45(9):819-2717041169
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;15(8):476-9516680409
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;15 Suppl 1:I63-7117177018
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;15 Suppl 1:I72-817177019
Cites: J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2006 Dec;16(6):713-2417201615
Cites: Curr Med Res Opin. 2007 Feb;23(2):379-9417288692
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;18(4):240-919156355
Cites: J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2009 Jun;19(3):253-6319519260
Cites: J Atten Disord. 2010 May;13(6):618-2819365087
Cites: Pediatrics. 2001 Nov;108(5):E8311694667
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2002 Nov;159(11):1896-90112411225
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2002 Aug;11(4):185-9512444428
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2002;63 Suppl 12:36-4312562060
Cites: Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2004 Mar;7(1):77-9714733627
Cites: Med Care. 2004 Mar;42(3):210-2015076820
Cites: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2004 Jun;25(3):166-7415194901
Cites: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2004 Aug;25(4):264-7115308927
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2004;13 Suppl 1:I36-4215322955
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1995 Oct;36(7):1141-598847377
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Jul;36(7):980-89204677
PubMed ID
19466476 View in PubMed
Less detail

209 records – page 1 of 21.