Skip header and navigation

Refine By

9 records – page 1 of 1.

Body dissatisfaction and dieting in 4,952 Norwegian children aged 11-15 years: less evidence for gender and age differences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30629
Source
Eat Weight Disord. 2003 Sep;8(3):238-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
R. Børresen
J H Rosenvinge
Author Affiliation
Fylkeshuset, Drammen, Norway.
Source
Eat Weight Disord. 2003 Sep;8(3):238-41
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age Factors
Body Image
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Diet, Reducing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Obesity - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Abstract
A number of studies have shown that dieting and body dissatisfaction are highly frequent among adolescents. We here describe the relationship between dieting and body dissatisfaction in 4,952 children selected from the 11, 13 and 15 year age cohorts of the Norwegian national sample in the multinational WHO survey "Health Behavior in School Children". Body dissatisfaction was defined as the subjective experience of being a bit or much too fat and, using this definition, about 20% of the boys reported body dissatisfaction and 7% that they were on a diet. About 37% of the girls reported body dissatisfaction and 15% that they were on a diet. Within the age cohorts, respectively 22%, 30% and 32% reported body dissatisfaction, whereas about 40% overall indicated no body dissatisfaction. Being on a diet was reported by 8% of the 11-year olds, and subsequently increased to 10% (13 years) and 14% (15 years). Multiple regression analysis showed that body dissatisfaction explained 33% of the variance in dieting behaviour, and that the overall effect of gender and age was small. Dieting and body dissatisfaction should therefore be recognised as being equally important among boys, and be counteracted within the framework of a health promotion strategy aimed at the general adolescent population.
PubMed ID
14649789 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood family structure and personality disorders in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93493
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;23(3):205-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Kantojärvi L.
Joukamaa M.
Miettunen J.
Läksy K.
Herva A.
Karvonen J T
Taanila A.
Veijola J.
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 26, FIN 90029 OYS, Oulu, Finland. liisa.kantojarvi@oulu.fi
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;23(3):205-11
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Only Child - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Single-Parent Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The association between childhood family structure and sociodemographic characteristics and personality disorders (PDs) in a general population sample was studied. METHODS: This study is a substudy of the prospective Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort Project with 1588 young adult subjects. The case-finding methods according to the DSM-III-R criteria for PDs were: (1) Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID) for 321 cases who participated in a 2-phase field study, (2) Finnish Hospital Discharge Register data, and (3) analysis of the patient records in public outpatient care in 1982-1997. Statistical analyses were performed on the association between PDs and family background factors. RESULTS: Altogether 110 (7.0%) of the subjects had at least one probable or definite PD. After adjusting for confounders (gender, parental social class and parental psychiatric disorder) the results indicated that single-parent family type in childhood was associated with cluster B PDs in adulthood. Being an only child in childhood was associated with cluster A PDs. No special childhood risk factors were found for cluster C PDs. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that single-parent family type at birth and being an only child in the 1960s are associated with PD in adulthood. Further studies are needed to explore the psychosocial aspects of family environment which may nowadays promote vulnerability to PDs in adulthood.
PubMed ID
18328677 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of self-reported emotional and behavioural problems in adolescents from Greece and Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162269
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Aug;96(8):1174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Aikaterini Kapi
Alexandra Veltsista
Ulla Sovio
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Chryssa Bakoula
Author Affiliation
First Department of Paediatrics, University of Athens, Aghia Sofia Children's Hospital, Athens, Greece.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Aug;96(8):1174-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Analysis of Variance
Anxiety - psychology
Behavioral Symptoms - psychology
Child
Child Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - ethnology
Follow-Up Studies
Greece - ethnology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Prospective Studies
Self Disclosure
Sex Factors
Social Behavior Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To compare self-reported emotional and behavioural problems among Greek and Finnish adolescents.
Youth Self-Report scores were analysed for 3373 Greek adolescents aged 18 years and 7039 Finnish adolescents aged 15-16 years from the general population in both countries. The impact of country, gender, place of residence, socioeconomic status (SES) and family stability on the scores was evaluated.
Only country and gender yielded small to medium effect on the scores. Greek boys scored significantly higher than Finns on 10 of the 11 YSR syndromes, particularly on the anxious/depressed scale. Greek girls scored significantly lower than Finnish girls on the somatic complaints and delinquent behaviour scales. In general, girls scored higher than boys on both internalising and externalising problems. The gender by country interaction revealed that Finnish girls reported more externalising problems.
The main differences marked in this comparison were the higher level of anxiety and depression in Greeks than Finns and the higher level of externalising problems in Finnish girls than boys. Cultural standards could play an important role in explaining these differences. Overall, it seems that only a small number of differences exist between a northern and southern European region.
PubMed ID
17655619 View in PubMed
Less detail

Correlates of depressive disorders in the Quebec general population 6 to 14 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165210
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2007 Jun;35(3):459-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Lise Bergeron
Jean-Pierre Valla
Nicole Smolla
Geneviève Piché
Claude Berthiaume
Marie St-Georges
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Rivière-des-Prairies Hospital, Fernand-Seguin Research Center, Université de Montréal, Montreal, 7070 Perras Boulevard, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. lise.bergeron.hrdp@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2007 Jun;35(3):459-74
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Birth Order
Child
Child Development
Child Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child of Impaired Parents
Data Collection
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Family Relations
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Only Child
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
There are relatively few community-based epidemiological studies in which correlates of depressive disorders were identified through multivariate analyses in children and adolescents aged 6--14 years. Moreover, several family characteristics (e.g., parent-child relationship) have never been explored in this regard. The purpose of this study was twofold. Using data from the Quebec Child Mental Health Survey, it sought: (1) to identify psychosocial correlates associated with depressive disorder in two age-groups (6--11 and 12-14 years) according to informant (child/adolescent, parent); and (2) to interpret the relative importance of correlates by ranking variables according to strength and consistency of association across age-groups. Logistic regression models show correlates to be inconsistent across informants. The ranking of correlates indicates a major contribution of only-child status/ordinal position, parent's major depressive disorder, stressful family events, and parent-child relationship, thereby supporting the hypothesis of the relevance of family context in the development of depression.
PubMed ID
17295062 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mother and father interactions over the first year with term and preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210526
Source
Res Nurs Health. 1996 Dec;19(6):451-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
M J Harrison
J. Magill-Evans
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Res Nurs Health. 1996 Dec;19(6):451-9
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Child Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Father-Child Relations
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Psychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Abstract
Mothers and fathers of 54 term infants and 49 preterm infants were observed individually interacting with their infant in the home during a structured task (Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale) when the child was 3 and 12 months old. Parents of preterm infants had lower interaction scores than parents of term infants. Differences between the groups were not explained by differences in the behavior of the infant, in levels of stress (measured by the Parenting Stress Index), in marital support (measured by the Dyadic Adjustment Scale), or in level of involvement with their child. Fathers of both term and preterm infants had lower interaction scores than mothers. Parents' interaction scores decreased over time, while the responsiveness and clarity of cues of the infants increased over time. The results are discussed in relationship to other research on prematurity stereotyping and the vulnerable child syndrome.
PubMed ID
8948399 View in PubMed
Less detail

The one-child family and violent criminality: a 31-year follow-up study of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32154
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Jun;158(6):960-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
L. Kemppainen
J. Jokelainen
M R Järvelin
M. Isohanni
P. Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Peltolantie 5, 90210 Oulu, Finland. liisa.kemppainen@oulu.fi
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Jun;158(6):960-2
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - epidemiology
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Cohort Studies
Criminal Psychology
Family Relations
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Odds Ratio
Only Child - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parent-Child Relations
Paternal Deprivation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Serious defects in social skills acquired during childhood may be associated with aggressive behavior in later life. The authors studied whether being an only child was associated with criminality in adulthood and, secondly, if parental factors increased the putative risk. METHOD: The authors used an unselected, prospectively collected large birth cohort. Data on crimes were linked with being an only child as well as with perinatal risk and maternal and paternal psychological risk factors among male subjects. RESULTS: The risk for violent crimes later in life was elevated among the only children. If perinatal or parental risks were combined with being an only child, the odds ratios for violent offending increased four-fold to eight-fold. A corresponding risk increase between being an only child and nonviolent offending was not detected. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the hypothesis that growing up as an only child is associated with violent criminality among male subjects.
PubMed ID
11384909 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Perception of environmental threats by children and adolescents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219160
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jan-Feb;85(1):56-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M F Raynault
F. Borgeat
Author Affiliation
Hôpital Saint-Luc, Montréal, QC.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jan-Feb;85(1):56-8
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Child
Child Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Ecology
Environment
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Justice
War
Abstract
Surveys conducted in Europe and North America over the last 30 years have shown that children and adolescents were particularly worried about the possibilities of nuclear war and unemployment. A study carried out in Montreal among young people of primary or high school level assessed their concerns about the future and inquired about what their priorities would be if they were political leaders. One hundred and twenty young people answered a questionnaire administered by a classmate. Results indicate that worries about environmental issues predominate. In comparison with previous surveys, this study suggests a recent change in the young generation from concerns about nuclear war to worries over ecological problems.
PubMed ID
8180927 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sense of coherence and school-related stress as predictors of subjective health complaints in early adolescence: interactive, indirect or direct relationships?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32059
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2001 Sep;53(5):603-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
T. Torsheim
L E Aaroe
B. Wold
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Health Promotion, University of Bergen, Norway. torbjoern.torsheim@psych.uib.no
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2001 Sep;53(5):603-14
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - classification
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Anxiety - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Child
Child Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Humans
Models, Psychological
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Stress, Psychological - complications - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The role of sense of coherence (SOC) on the relationship between adolescent school-related stress and subjective health complaints was tested with structural equation modelling. As part of the crossnational WHO-survey 'Health behaviour in school-aged children 1997/98' Norwegian representative samples of 1592 grade 6, 1534 grade 8, and 1605 grade 10 students completed measures on SOC, school-related stress and subjective health complaints. A test of nested structural models revealed that both stress-preventive (delta chi2 814. 86, p
PubMed ID
11478540 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The psychological and psychiatric study of children living in Kaluga and Bryansk provinces, Russia (the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35500
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1995;95(1):70-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
I A Kozlova
A A Pukhovskii
V Iu Riabukhin
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1995;95(1):70-4
Date
1995
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Japan
Nuclear Warfare
Parents - psychology
Power Plants
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Ukraine
Abstract
According to WHO project "Brain Damage in Utero" in the framework of the screening phase of the programme, 1025 children (725 in experimental group-Novozybkov and Klintsy towns of Bryansk region; 300 in control group--Obninsk town of Kaluga region) and 600 parents (300 in experimental group and 300 in control group) were studied using standardized methods of psychological psychiatric assessment (Draw-a-man test, British picture vocabulary test, Raven coloured matrices, Parental and teacher Rutter Scales, CHQ-28, Verbal subtest of Wechsler test) for potential psychological and psychiatric effects of Chernobyl accident on child's intelligence, behavioural and emotional state, mental health of parents and parental intellectual level. The following results were obtained: comparison of verbal IQ scores in children revealed a 6-fold increase of these values in experiment group. Comparison of nonverbal IQ scores in children revealed that these values are 4 times higher in experimental group. Comparison of scores according to Rutter parental and teacher scales revealed that emotional and behavioural disorders are 1.5 times more prevalent in children of experimental group. All the above differences were statistically significant. Comparison of CHQ-28 scores was indicative of relative prevalence of these values in parents of experimental group, but there was no statistically significant difference between such score in experimental and control groups. Comparison of scores of parental IQ showed relative prevalence of these values in experimental group. The results obtained can not be completely estimated without thorough identification of individual doses received by mothers and their children. Only after obtaining these data it will be possible to solve the problem of dose effect.
PubMed ID
7778398 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.