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271 records – page 1 of 28.

Abortion denied--outcome of mothers and babies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240818
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Feb 15;130(4):361-2, 366
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1984
Author
C. Del Campo
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Feb 15;130(4):361-2, 366
Date
Feb-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion Applicants - psychology
Abortion, Legal
Canada
Child Psychology
Female
Humans
Internationality
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Pregnant Women
Notes
Cites: Fam Plann Perspect. 1975 Jul-Aug;7(4):165-711098923
Cites: N Z Med J. 1977 May 25;85(588):424-5271838
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1980 Feb 1;136(3):374-97352527
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1983 Feb 1;145(3):279-846824018
Cites: Sven Lakartidn. 1957 Dec 6;54(49):3709-8413507022
Cites: Nord Med. 1959 Aug 6;62:1182-514403964
PubMed ID
6692231 View in PubMed
Less detail

Across six nations: stressful events in the lives of children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35027
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 1996;26(3):139-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Yamamoto
O L Davis
S. Dylak
J. Whittaker
C. Marsh
P C van der Westhuizen
Author Affiliation
University of Colorado at Denver 80217, USA.
Source
Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 1996;26(3):139-50
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Australia
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Reference Values
Stress, Psychological
United States
Abstract
A total of 1,729 children (2nd-9th grades) in South Africa, Iceland, Poland, Australia, the U.K., and the U.S.A. rated 20 events in terms of how upsetting they are. Save in Poland, the ratings were in close agreement (r, .85-.97), placing the loss of parent at the top and a new baby sibling at the bottom. In Poland, the baby's arrival led the list. Even so, what was seen as quite upsetting fell everywhere in the same two categories--experiences that threaten one's sense of security and those that occasion personal denigration and embarrassment.
PubMed ID
8819876 View in PubMed
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Adjustment and behaviour of Finnish immigrant children in Stockholm. II. The parents' assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13034
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1980;8(1):43-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
G. Aurelius
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1980;8(1):43-8
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Child Psychology
Comparative Study
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Finland - ethnology
Humans
Male
Parents
Prospective Studies
Social Adjustment
Social Behavior
Sweden
Abstract
The object of the investigation was to study the behaviour and adjustment of Finnish children following their immigration to Sweden, and to see whether there was any connection between the families' acclimatization and the children's adjustment at the time of the investigation, three years after their migration from Finland. The material consisted of 40 children from 27 families. The parents were interviewed by a Finnish psychologist. The results were co-ordinated with those of an investigation of the same children at school. To judge from the parents' statements, behavioural disorders were to be found in the children more often after immigration than prior to it or three years after. The disturbances most often mentioned as appearing after migration were shyness, poor self-esteem, nail-biting and psychomotor unrest. Children from homes where the parents reported the existence of relationship disturbances, problems with alcohol or depression were more often maladjusted and had greater difficulty in being accepted at school. Even if the adjustment of immigrant children to school can be improved by educational measures, this should also be considered in the context of the families' and parents' situation in society.
PubMed ID
7375878 View in PubMed
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Afraid of medical care school-aged children's narratives about medical fear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147224
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria Forsner
Lilian Jansson
Anna Söderberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden. mfr@du.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Coercion
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Narration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Pediatric Nursing
Play and Playthings - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Patient Relations
Social Support
Sweden
Thinking
Videotape Recording
Abstract
Fear can be problematic for children who come into contact with medical care. This study aimed to illuminate the meaning of being afraid when in contact with medical care, as narrated by children 7-11 years old. Nine children participated in the study, which applied a phenomenological hermeneutic analysis methodology. The children experienced medical care as "being threatened by a monster," but the possibility of breaking this spell of fear was also mediated. The findings indicate the important role of being emotionally hurt in a child's fear to create, together with the child, an alternate narrative of overcoming this fear.
PubMed ID
19931150 View in PubMed
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African-American, Anglo-American, and Anglo-Canadian grade 4 children's concepts of old people and of extended family.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224967
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 1992;35(3):161-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
D T Slaughter-Defoe
V S Kuehne
J K Straker
Author Affiliation
Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois.
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 1992;35(3):161-78
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans
Aged
Attitude
Canada
Child
Child Psychology
Continental Population Groups
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
United States
Abstract
A cross-national study of 104 fourth grade children's concepts of old people and extended family was conducted in Canada and the United States, using the Children's Attitudes Toward the Elderly Scale (CATE), and a modified version of the Gilby and Pederson (1982) Family Concept Interview. Both Anglo-American and African-American children were included in the U.S. sample. Results indicated that Anglo-American and Anglo-Canadian children were significantly more similar in their attitudes toward the elderly and their concepts of family than African-American and Anglo-American children. In comparison with the other two cultural groups, Anglo-American children were significantly more likely to include extended family members in their concept of who is family; Anglo-Canadian children had a significantly higher level of age discrimination ability; and African-American children showed a trend toward more positive attitudes toward older people. Overall findings of negative attitudes toward old people were consistent with earlier studies. The implications of children's ageist attitudes for increasingly aging Western societies are noted, particularly given impoverished children's potential need for extrafamilial social supports.
PubMed ID
1399078 View in PubMed
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["An ethical dilemma requiring further discussion". Where is the limit to physicians' role in deportation of refugee children?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35161
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Sep 13;92(37):3285
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-13-1995

An everyday struggle-Swedish families' lived experiences during a child's cancer treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148338
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Oct;24(5):423-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Maria Björk
Thomas Wiebe
Inger Hallström
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. maria.bjork@med.lu.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Oct;24(5):423-32
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Cost of Illness
Family - psychology
Family Health
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Pediatric Nursing
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Isolation
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim was to elucidate families' lived experience during a child's cancer treatment. Interviews were conducted with members of 11 affected families. A hermeneutical phenomenological approach was chosen. "Focus on the ill child-An everyday struggle" emerged as an essential theme. The families' lived experience of daily life was described as "feeling drained," "disrupting family life," "feeling locked up and isolated," "retaining normality," "becoming experts," and "changing perspectives." The result indicates that life during a child's cancer treatment is a taxing period and that the entire family is in need of support to ease their burdens.
PubMed ID
19782901 View in PubMed
Less detail

Applying Luria's diagnostic principles in the neuropsychological assessment of children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200691
Source
Neuropsychol Rev. 1999 Jun;9(2):89-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
M. Korkman
Author Affiliation
Helsinki University Central Hospital, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Pediatric Neurology, Finland.
Source
Neuropsychol Rev. 1999 Jun;9(2):89-105
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Damage, Chronic - complications - diagnosis
Child
Child Development
Child Psychology
Cognition Disorders - classification - diagnosis - etiology
Finland
Humans
Language Disorders - classification - physiopathology
Neuropsychological Tests
Neuropsychology - methods
Psychological Theory
Psychometrics - methods
Reference Values
United States
Abstract
The first part of this article examines the theoretical justification for applying Luria's approach in the assessment of children. It is concluded that Luria's concepts of functional systems and the principle of specifying primary and secondary deficits may be applied to children. However, the selection of functional components to assess should be based on traditions of child neuropsychology rather than on Luria's assessment of adults. In addition, the tendency for comorbid disorders, mechanisms of neural adaptation to damage, and the prevalent types of brain abnormality in children render brain-behavior relationships more complex in children than in adults. The second part of the article describes how Luria's methods were adapted for use with children. An assessment, NEPSY, was developed by integrating Luria's views with contemporary child neuropsychological traditions. The NEPSY includes 27 homogeneous and psychometrically developed subtests, standardized in the United States and Finland for the age range of 3 to 12 years. The rationale of analyzing disorders of cognitive processes through a comprehensive and systematic assessment of their components, characteristic of Luria's approach, was preserved, but more specific principles of diagnosis were modified. Research findings obtained with a previously published, Finnish NEPSY version are presented.
PubMed ID
10509732 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Are life experiences of children significant for the development of somatic disease? A literature review]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14231
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3644-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1997
Author
O R Haavet
B. Grünfeld
Author Affiliation
Romsås helsesenter, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3644-7
Date
Oct-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Causality
Child
Child Psychology
English Abstract
Health status
Humans
Life Change Events
Models, Psychological
Morbidity
Norway - epidemiology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Risk factors
Abstract
This review presents the relationship between serious life events, chronic family difficulties and illness, and focuses on how healthy children cope. Hospitalised children had experienced about twice as many serious life events as children in healthy environments. Known diseases related to stress are eczema, upper respiratory tract infections, asthma, ulcerative colitis, heart disease in adults, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and juvenile diabetes. Research on healthy children at risk (resiliences) has revealed a number of social and interpersonal protective factors. A modified biopsychosocial model, for the purpose of understanding the health status and care of children at high risk, is presented. More research is needed to understand these multietiological diseases in order to develop strategies for the promotion of good health.
PubMed ID
9417658 View in PubMed
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Are the recommended taxonomies for the stages of youth smoking onset consistent with youth's perceptions of their smoking status?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167538
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):316-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Scott T Leatherdale
Paul W McDonald
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Cancer Care Ontario, 620 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 2L7. scott.leatherdale@cancercare.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):316-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Child
Child Psychology
Classification
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Ontario
Smoking
Abstract
To examine if the recommended taxonomies for the stages of youth smoking onset are aligned with the beliefs of smoking youth.
The SHAPES Tobacco Module was administered to 23,047 students (grades 9 to 13) in a convenience sample of 29 secondary schools during the 2000-2001 school year in the province of Ontario, Canada. Cross-tabs were used to compare a student's self-perceived smoking status to their smoking status as determined with the currently recommended stage taxonomies for smoking behaviour.
The majority of students classified as regular smokers (52.4%) and experimental smokers (98.9%) did not actually consider themselves to be smokers. Self-reported smoking status appeared to be relatively consistent for the never smoker and established smoker categories.
Additional research is required to develop stage taxonomies that are aligned with the self-perceptions of non-established youth smokers.
PubMed ID
16967753 View in PubMed
Less detail

271 records – page 1 of 28.