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394 records – page 1 of 40.

[Actual diet of children in orphanages]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31096
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2002;71(5):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
A T Elizarov
L P Volkotrub
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2002;71(5):7-10
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutrition
Calcium - analysis
Child
Child Nutrition
Diet
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
English Abstract
Female
Food
Food Services - standards
Humans
Iodine - analysis
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Orphanages
Phosphorus - analysis
Siberia
Trace Elements - analysis
Vitamins - analysis
Abstract
The account of quantitative and qualitative structure of diets of children of children's houses has revealed infringements in organisation of mode of a meals, and also unbalance of diet on structure of food substances, including on iodine, that can promote development of iodine-dependence diseases.
PubMed ID
12599990 View in PubMed
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Aetiology of severe demarcated enamel opacities--an evaluation based on prospective medical and social data from 17,000 children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101274
Source
Swed Dent J. 2011;35(2):57-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Tobias G Fagrell
Johnny Ludvigsson
Christer Ullbro
Sven-Ake Lundin
Göran Koch
Author Affiliation
Paediatric Dentistry, Special Dental Services, Sahlgrenska University Hospital Mölndal, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 2011;35(2):57-67
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dental Enamel - drug effects - pathology
Dental Enamel Hypoplasia - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Infant
Molar - pathology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
During the 1970s dentists reported an increasing prevalence of a "new" type of enamel disturbance.The disturbance was very specific, with areas of demarcated hypomineralised enamel, and was mostly found in permanent first molars and incisors. Several studies have tried to reveal the aetiology behind the enamel disturbance but sofar no clear factors correlated have been found. The aim of the present study was to evaluate aetiological factors to severe demarcated opacities (SDO) in first permanent molars in a large cohort of children enrolled in the "All Babies in Southeast Sweden" (ABIS) project. ABIS is a prospective study of all children in five Swedish counties born between Oct 1, 1997 and Oct 1, 1999, in all about 17,000 children.They have been followed from birth with recording of a large number of factors on nutrition, diseases, medication, infections, social situation etc. With help from 89 Public Dental Service clinics in the same area preliminary examinations of the children, born between Oct 1,1997 and Oct 1,1999, reported 595 children with severe demarcated opacities (SDO) in first molars.These children and a randomly selected age matched group of 1,200 children were further invited to be examined by specialists in paediatric dentistry. At these examinations 224 severe cases were identified as well as 253 children completely without enamel disturbances among children registered in ABIS.These two groups were analysed according to any correlation between SDO and variables in the ABIS databank. The analyses showed no association between SDO and pre-, peri-, and neonatal data. However, we found a positive association between SDO and breastfeeding for more than 6 months (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.2), late introduction of gruel (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-2.9), and late introduction of infant formula (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.9). A combination of these three variables increased the risk to develop SDO by more than five times (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.6-15.7). No significant associations were found to other environmental, developmental, or medical factors. We conclude that nutritional conditions during first 6 months of life may influence the risk to develop severe demarcated opacities in first permanent molars.
PubMed ID
21827015 View in PubMed
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[A hygienic appraisal of the actual nutrition and nutritional status of boarding school pupils in the Komi Republic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211957
Source
Gig Sanit. 1996 May-Jun;(3):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
A V Istomin
I G Mikhailov
A L Kozlova
Source
Gig Sanit. 1996 May-Jun;(3):20-2
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diet
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Humans
Nutritional Status
Russia
Seasons
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Energy expenditure, physical and mental capacity for work, ascorbic acid excretion, basic foodstuff supply were investigated in 7-9-year-old pupils from boarding schools. Specific features of the alimentary state of the children were used as a basis for working out hygienic recommendations to improve children's diets and health.
PubMed ID
8925956 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) cohort study: rationale and methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122539
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2014 Jan;10(1):44-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Bonnie J Kaplan
Gerald F Giesbrecht
Brenda M Y Leung
Catherine J Field
Deborah Dewey
Rhonda C Bell
Donna P Manca
Maeve O'Beirne
David W Johnston
Victor J Pop
Nalini Singhal
Lisa Gagnon
Francois P Bernier
Misha Eliasziw
Linda J McCargar
Libbe Kooistra
Anna Farmer
Marja Cantell
Laki Goonewardene
Linda M Casey
Nicole Letourneau
Jonathan W Martin
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Department of Family Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Primary Health Care, University of Tilburg, Tilburg, The Netherlands Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Medical Genetics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Teaching & Research Support, University of Groningen, The Netherlands Clinical & Developmental Neuropsychology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands Department of Paediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Lab Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2014 Jan;10(1):44-60
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Anthropometry
Child Development
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Multivariate Analysis
Neurons - metabolism
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study is an ongoing prospective cohort study that recruits pregnant women early in pregnancy and, as of 2012, is following up their infants to 3 years of age. It has currently enrolled approximately 5000 Canadians (2000 pregnant women, their offspring and many of their partners). The primary aims of the APrON study were to determine the relationships between maternal nutrient intake and status, before, during and after gestation, and (1) maternal mood; (2) birth and obstetric outcomes; and (3) infant neurodevelopment. We have collected comprehensive maternal nutrition, anthropometric, biological and mental health data at multiple points in the pregnancy and the post-partum period, as well as obstetrical, birth, health and neurodevelopmental outcomes of these pregnancies. The study continues to follow the infants through to 36 months of age. The current report describes the study design and methods, and findings of some pilot work. The APrON study is a significant resource with opportunities for collaboration.
PubMed ID
22805165 View in PubMed
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American Institute of Nutrition, The American Society for Clinical Nutrition, and The Nutrition Society of Canada. Third joint meeting, 1979. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247166
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1979 Jun;32(6):i-xxxiv
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Jun-1979

[An epidemiological index to assess the nutritional status of children based in a polynomial model of values from Z punctuation for the age in Mexico].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178648
Source
Arch Latinoam Nutr. 2004 Mar;54(1):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
A. Avila-Curiel
T. Shamah
L. Barragán
A. Chávez
Maria Avila
L. Juárez
Author Affiliation
Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública de México.
Source
Arch Latinoam Nutr. 2004 Mar;54(1):50-7
Date
Mar-2004
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight
Child Nutrition Disorders - epidemiology
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Nutrition Disorders - epidemiology
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Models, Statistical
Nutrition Disorders - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Abstract
A nutritional status index was built by modeling the mathematical function of the mean Z scores of weight for age, from 60,079 children under five years of age, selected in a probabilistic fashion from the Mexican population. The most precise mathematical model was a fifth degree polynomial. The correlation coefficient was between .937
PubMed ID
15332356 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of child health and nutrition in a northern Swedish County. II. Methodological study of the recall technique.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44162
Source
Nutr Metab. 1970;12(6):321-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970

[Anna-Karin, nurse in the service of the UN--she works for 6th time in a developing country. Interview by Mikael Dolfe.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39271
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Mar 6;10(5):8-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-1986

Anthropometry at the time of diagnosis in Danish children with inflammatory bowel disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29341
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2005 Nov;94(11):1682-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Anders Paerregaard
Frederikke Uldall Urne
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. anders.paerregaard@hh.hosp.dk
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2005 Nov;94(11):1682-3
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height
Body mass index
Child
Child Nutrition Disorders - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Growth
Humans
Infant
Abstract
All patients below 15 y of age living in the eastern part of Denmark with a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) during the period 1998-2000 were identified (n=94) and anthropometrical data at the time of diagnosis were evaluated.CONCLUSION: The height-for-age and the BMI-for-age, as evaluated by z-scores, of children with ulcerative colitis (UC) did not differ from those of normal Danish children, but Crohn's disease (CD) children had significantly lower height and BMI values, both when compared to normal children and children with UC. In contrast to UC, CD is frequently complicated by malnutrition and growth retardation at the time of diagnosis.
PubMed ID
16303711 View in PubMed
Less detail

394 records – page 1 of 40.