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41 records – page 1 of 5.

Source
Child Health Care. 1988;17(1):1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
C A Corr
D M Corr
Source
Child Health Care. 1988;17(1):1-11
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Health Services
Hospices
Humans
Palliative Care
Quality of Life
Social Environment
Social Support
United States
Abstract
This article describes the application of hospice principles and values to situations involving children--here identified by the phrase "pediatric hospice care." The exposition is carried out in two ways. First, we explore the basic principles and values of hospice care to make them clear as a foundation for what follows and to dispel misunderstandings. Second, we indicate some of the many ways in which those principles and values can have relevance to situations involving children and to institutions in our society. Our underlying concern is to acknowledge the work of those caregivers who are already engaged in some aspect of this sort of care and to encourage expansion of that interest on behalf of those children and families who need this sort of supportive care.
PubMed ID
10315759 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Comparison of medical and social support system for children with severe disabilities in Toronto and Tokyo].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150367
Source
No To Hattatsu. 2009 Mar;41(2):135-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009

Family-friendly HIV and AIDS care the goal at Vancouver's Oak Tree Clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212103
Source
CMAJ. 1996 May 1;154(9):1407-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1996
Author
H. Kent
Source
CMAJ. 1996 May 1;154(9):1407-9
Date
May-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - therapy
British Columbia
Child
Child Health Services
Female
HIV Infections - therapy
Humans
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Social Support
Women's Health Services
Abstract
A clinic at Vancouver's old Shaughnessy Hospital offers specialized care for women and children infected with HIV. Drs. David Burdge and Jack Forbes, the codirectors, believe the "one-stop-shopping" for services offered by physicians, social workers, nurses, dietitians and pharmacists helps improve quality of life for families living with the consequences of HIV and AIDS. BC has the highest cumulative incidence of AIDS in the country, and demand for the clinic's services has far exceeded expectations.
PubMed ID
8616745 View in PubMed
Less detail

Supportive and nonsupportive qualities of child health nurses' contacts with strained infant mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45920
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Jun;17(2):169-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Elisabeth U Arborelius
Sven G Bremberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Jun;17(2):169-75
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services
Depression, Postpartum - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Parenting - psychology
Social Support
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS: To examine how strained mothers perceive the support they receive from Swedish child health nurse. POPULATION AND METHODS: Twenty-four consecutive strained, infant mothers at nine child health centres were invited to participate. The mothers were interviewed when the child was 8 months of age. The mothers also reported their perceptions of their parenting competence by means of a questionnaire. RESULTS: Five components of the nurses' support were discerned: positive emotional support, positive informational support, support of the parental role which was either positive or negative, and pressure to accept social norms on child care. A third of the mothers reported strong positive support, decreasing depressive symptoms and favourable perceptions of their own parenting ability. Another third of the mothers reported negative contacts with the nurses, persisting depressive symptoms, and unfavourable perceptions of their parenting competence. The nurses' pressure for the mothers to adapt to certain social norms of child care seemed to affect the latter group of mothers negatively. CONCLUSIONS: In order to support strained mothers effectively it is necessary to clarify and resolve conflicts between different programme objectives.
PubMed ID
12753518 View in PubMed
Less detail

Managing parental groups: personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280993
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Feb;26(3-4):466-476
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Åsa Lefèvre
Pia Lundqvist
Eva Drevenhorn
Inger Hallström
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Feb;26(3-4):466-476
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Parenting - psychology
Parents - education - psychology
Pediatric Nursing - methods
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate the experience and personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses.
During their child's first year, all parents in Sweden are invited to participate in parental groups within the child health service; however, only 49% choose to participate. Despite extensive experience, child healthcare nurses find managing parental groups challenging and express a need for training in group dynamics and group leadership.
The study was designed as a controlled study with a pretest/post-test design where the participants form their own control group.
A group leadership course was given to 56 child healthcare nurses and evaluated in a pre- and postintervention questionnaire, a course evaluation and an interview with the course leaders.
The child healthcare nurses felt their group leadership skills were strengthened and the majority (96%) felt that the course had changed their way of leading parental groups. They felt that the group leader role had been clarified and that they had obtained several new tools to use in their groups.
Clarifying the role of group leader and adding knowledge about group leadership and dynamics seems to have increased the self-confidence for child healthcare nurses in group leadership. Improved confidence in group management might motivate the child healthcare nurses to further develop parental groups to attract the parents who currently choose not to participate.
PubMed ID
27325290 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perceptions of parents of handicapped children concerning nurses and the health care system as it affects them.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223544
Source
AARN News Lett. 1992 Jul-Aug;48(7):10-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
W. Settle
Source
AARN News Lett. 1992 Jul-Aug;48(7):10-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Child
Child Health Services
Disabled Persons
Home Care Services
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Parents - psychology
Pediatric Nursing
Professional-Family Relations
Social Perception
Social Support
Abstract
Because of the change in mandate for Home Care Programs across Alberta, new cases of children with handicaps are now being assessed by nurses. Social workers, through the Handicapped Children's Services program, have traditionally been the ones to assess these children. This is a very new area for nurses and there is much to learn. Even less is known about the parents' perspective in working with families in community. As both a nurse working in the community and a parent of a child with special needs I see many of the issues from two sides. This study seeks to find out more about parents' feelings and views regarding nursing and the health care system. This knowledge is helpful to nurses working with these families as they strive to understand, communicate and build a helping relationship.
PubMed ID
1387279 View in PubMed
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[Reduced number of home visits in child health care. Nurses' attitudes determine the development of the service].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138079
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Nov 24-30;107(47):2968-71
Publication Type
Article

Managing parental groups during early childhood: New challenges faced by Swedish child health-care nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273282
Source
J Child Health Care. 2015 Sep;19(3):381-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Åsa Lefèvre
Lundqvist Pia
Drevenhorn Eva
Hallström Inger
Source
J Child Health Care. 2015 Sep;19(3):381-91
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child Health Services
Health promotion
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Internet
Parents - education
Pediatric Nursing - education
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Teaching
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe child health centre (CHC) nurses' views of managing parental groups during early childhood. All 311 CHC nurses working within the Swedish CHC system in one county were asked to complete a web-based questionnaire. Findings showed that although the CHC nurses were experienced, several found group leadership challenging and difficult. The need for specialized groups for young parents, single parents and parents whose first language was not Swedish was identified by 57% of the nurses. The CHC nurses found the participation of fathers in their parental groups to be low (an estimate of 10-20%), and 30% of the nurses made special efforts to make the fathers participate. Education in group dynamics and group leadership can strengthen CHC nurses in managing parental groups. It is recommended that specialized parental groups are organized by a few family centres so CHC nurses can develop their skill in managing such groups.
PubMed ID
24298189 View in PubMed
Less detail

Parents' experiences of parental groups in Swedish child health-care: Do they get what they want?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280739
Source
J Child Health Care. 2016 Mar;20(1):46-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Åsa Lefèvre
Pia Lundqvist
Eva Drevenhorn
Inger Hallström
Source
J Child Health Care. 2016 Mar;20(1):46-54
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parenting - psychology
Parents - education - psychology
Pediatric Nursing
Primary Health Care
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Almost all parents in Sweden are invited to parental groups organized by the child health service (CHS) during their child's first year, but only 40% chose to attend. The aim of this study was to describe parents' experiences of participating in these parental groups. A total of 143 parents from 71 different parental groups at 27 child health-care (CHC) centres in one Swedish county completed an online questionnaire. A majority of the parents found the parental groups to be meaningful and more than 60% met someone in the group who they socialized with outside the meetings. Parents wanted a greater focus on child-related community information, existential questions, relationships and parenting in general. Group leadership seems to be of significance to how parents in a group connect and whether the parental role is affected. Making CHC nurses more aware of the topics parents desire could help them meet parents' needs. Education and training in group dynamics and group leadership could be of value in further improving the high-quality service CHC nurses already offer parents. More knowledge is needed about what would attract those parents who do not participate.
PubMed ID
25171811 View in PubMed
Less detail

41 records – page 1 of 5.