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47 records – page 1 of 5.

[The health center--a sacred cow? What do parents think about child health check ups provided by family practitioners?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34099
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 10;117(21):3115-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1997
Author
B. Folkvord
O. Thorsen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Sep 10;117(21):3115-6
Date
Sep-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services
Family Practice
Humans
Norway
Parents
Questionnaires
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 10;117(24):35589411923
PubMed ID
9381449 View in PubMed
Less detail

[What do parents think about health centers?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34077
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 30;117(29):4289
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1997
Author
S Z Bratland
M. Steen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 30;117(29):4289
Date
Nov-30-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Health Services
Family Practice
Humans
Norway
Parents
Questionnaires
PubMed ID
9441480 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Editorial: Information to parents of a retarded child].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251152
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1976 Apr 12;138(16):995-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-1976
Author
A H Arnfred
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1976 Apr 12;138(16):995-6
Date
Apr-12-1976
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child care
Child Health Services
Counseling
Denmark
Humans
Intellectual Disability
Parents
Referral and Consultation
PubMed ID
1265882 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child-environment supervisors--a new strategy for prevention of childhood accidents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41513
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:102-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
L H Gustafsson
A. Hammarström
K. Linder
E. Stjernberg
C. Sundelin
C. Thulin
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:102-7
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
Environment Design
Humans
Methods
Parents
Safety
Sweden
Abstract
This paper is a provisional report from an ongoing field experiment in Uppsala, Sweden, with the aim to reduce the number of serious childhood accidents. Groups of parents have been systematically trained to function as child-environment supervisors. The experiences have been very positive so far. The child-environment supervisors have proved to possess good knowledge about how to prevent accidents. A large number of hazards have been detected and successfully eliminated. The groups are now taking an active part in the planning of new housing estates. The findings also indicate that the Child Health Organization should be able to play a more active role in the work of environmental improvement for the safety of children. A suggestion for a collective strategy for such activity has been worked out.
PubMed ID
291281 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exploring Nurses', Preschool Teachers' and Parents' Perspectives on Information Sharing Using SDQ in a Swedish Setting - A Qualitative Study Using Grounded Theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284738
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0168388
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Elisabet Fält
Anna Sarkadi
Helena Fabian
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0168388
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Nurses
Parents
School Teachers
Sweden
Abstract
Evidence-based methods to identify behavioural problems among children are not regularly used within the Swedish Child healthcare. A new procedure was therefore introduced to assess children through parent- and preschool teacher reports using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). This study aims to explore nurses', preschool teachers' and parents' perspectives of this new information sharing model. Using the grounded theory methodology, semi-structured interviews with nurses (n = 10) at child health clinics, preschool teachers (n = 13) and parents (n = 11) of 3-, 4- and 5-year-old children were collected and analysed between March 2014 and June 2014. The analysis was conducted using constant comparative method. The participants were sampled purposively within a larger trial in Sweden. Results indicate that all stakeholders shared a desire to have a complete picture of the child's health. The perceptions that explain why the stakeholders were in favour of the new procedure-the 'causal conditions' in a grounded theory model-included: (1) Nurses thought that visits after 18-months were unsatisfactory, (2) Preschool teachers wanted to identify children with difficulties and (3) Parents viewed preschool teachers as being qualified to assess children. However, all stakeholders had doubts as to whether there was a reliable way to assess children's behaviour. Although nurses found the SDQ to be useful for their clinical evaluation, they noticed that not all parents chose to participate. Both teachers and parents acknowledged benefits of information sharing. However, the former had concerns about parental reactions to their assessments and the latter about how personal information was handled. The theoretical model developed describes that the causal conditions and current context of child healthcare in many respects endorse the introduction of information sharing. However, successful implementation requires considerable work to address barriers: the tension between normative thinking versus helping children with developmental problems for preschool teachers and dealing with privacy issues and inequity in participation for parents.
Notes
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2006 Apr;16(4):547-5916513996
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;46(8):850-816033633
Cites: Ambul Pediatr. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):347-5117116609
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013 Oct 16;13:96124131587
Cites: Pediatrics. 2015 May;135(5):e1210-925847804
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;66(6):403-1322397524
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2006 Jun;188:547-5316738345
Cites: Med J Aust. 2004 Mar 15;180(6 Suppl):S57-6015012583
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2003;57(5):357-6314522609
Cites: Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev. 2010 Sep;13(3):254-7420589428
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2008 Apr 04;8:10618394152
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Jul 28;323(7306):19111473907
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;48(4):400-319242383
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 Jul;52(7):728-3623800486
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;40(11):1337-4511699809
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2000 Dec;177:534-911102329
Cites: Child Care Health Dev. 2015 Nov;41(6):853-6425707313
Cites: Med J Aust. 2004 Mar 15;180(6 Suppl):S55-615012582
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;46(8):837-4916033632
PubMed ID
28076401 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental poisoning in pre-school children in the Stockholm area. Medical, psychosocial and preventive aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41505
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:96-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
M. Eriksson
G. Larsson
B. Winbladh
R. Zetterström
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:96-101
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Child
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Humans
Parents
Poisoning - epidemiology - mortality - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Accidental poisoning in pre-school children requiring hospital admission has increased sixfold from 1955 to 1975 in the Stockholm area. The mortality from this accident has decreased from 0.5 to less than 0.1 per 100 000 pre-school children in the whole of Sweden during the same period. Medical and psychosocial background factors were investigated in 104 consecutive in-patients (0--6 years old) with accidental poisoning and compared to an out-patient group, a group of patients who only had called the poison control centre, and a matched control group from Child Health Centres. There were no difference between the groups regarding health and history of earlier accidents except that 20--25% of the families of the poisoned children and 7% of the control families had called the Poison Control Centre before. Change of residence during the last 6 months was much commoner among families of poisoned children than of nonpoisoned. Other social stress factors were more common among in-patients than out-patients. The measures taken by the parents to combat the poisoning were adequate in most cases. The decrease in mortality inspite of the increase in potentially dangerous accidental poisonings may be attributed to a good knowledge among parents about adequate measures and where to seek advice resulting in early treatment, and to intensive care and antidote therapy.
PubMed ID
291296 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health care systems for pre-school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42279
Source
Proc R Soc Med. 1976 May;69(5):340-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1976

[Parent satisfaction with infant and preschool clinics].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244029
Source
Can J Public Health. 1981 Nov-Dec;72(6):439-46
Publication Type
Article

47 records – page 1 of 5.