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102 records – page 1 of 11.

Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Apr 1;130(7):849-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1984
Author
W. Feldman
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Apr 1;130(7):849-50
Date
Apr-1-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child Development
Child Health Services - utilization
Humans
Infant
Office Visits - utilization
Notes
Cites: Pediatrics. 1970 Jun;45(6):950-605422118
Cites: Pediatrics. 1975 Mar;55(3):313-261143972
Cites: J Pediatr. 1979 Jul;95(1):1-9479987
Cites: Pediatrics. 1980 Apr;65(4):815-206988787
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Nov;70(11):1180-87425191
Cites: Pediatrics. 1980 Dec;66(6):889-927454479
PubMed ID
6704836 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Do child health centers answer the need found in society?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40689
Source
Vardfacket. 1981 Aug 27;5(15):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-27-1981
Author
I. Ritzman
Source
Vardfacket. 1981 Aug 27;5(15):30-1
Date
Aug-27-1981
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Humans
Maternal-Child Health Centers - supply & distribution
Sweden
PubMed ID
6913333 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child-environment supervisors--a new strategy for prevention of childhood accidents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41513
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:102-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
L H Gustafsson
A. Hammarström
K. Linder
E. Stjernberg
C. Sundelin
C. Thulin
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:102-7
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
Environment Design
Humans
Methods
Parents
Safety
Sweden
Abstract
This paper is a provisional report from an ongoing field experiment in Uppsala, Sweden, with the aim to reduce the number of serious childhood accidents. Groups of parents have been systematically trained to function as child-environment supervisors. The experiences have been very positive so far. The child-environment supervisors have proved to possess good knowledge about how to prevent accidents. A large number of hazards have been detected and successfully eliminated. The groups are now taking an active part in the planning of new housing estates. The findings also indicate that the Child Health Organization should be able to play a more active role in the work of environmental improvement for the safety of children. A suggestion for a collective strategy for such activity has been worked out.
PubMed ID
291281 View in PubMed
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[A comparative evaluation of the health of children based on the results of medical check-ups and questionnaires].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177896
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;(4):9-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
T M Maksimova
V B Belov
N P Lushkina
N A Barabanova
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;(4):9-14
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Physical Examination - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Abstract
Objective evaluations of population's health belong to the most important tasks of the public-health science. Such evaluations made in respect to children are of extra importance. One must comprehensively understand the potentialities and abilities of the methods used for the purpose. A comparative evaluation of 387 children, aged 10, was based on the findings of medical check-ups and on questionnaires of their parents. 37.7% of children, who were evaluated by their mothers as having good health, were diagnosed by doctors as having a chronic disease, i.e. the diagnosis did not entail any life limitations for such children. 40% of those children, who were referred to by their parents as sick (poor health), were classified by doctors as belonging not to category 3 (chronic pathology) but to a category of healthier children (category 2). Below 10% of children, who were describe by their parents as having poor health, were among those who were put by doctors on the list of group 3 on the basis of medical check-ups. As for those children who had an actively displayed chronic disease with a pronounced clinical course, like bronchial asthma, ulcer etc., the opinions of doctors and of their parents coincided in a majority of cases. The comparative evaluations of children' health based on questionnaires of their parents and on medical check-ups exposed a certain coincidence and specificity of such evaluations since they are based on different approaches.
PubMed ID
15490651 View in PubMed
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[Observations from an outpatient clinic for children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41252
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1979 Oct 20;99(29):1478-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1979

[Methodological approaches to estimating the need for hospital care for the newborn]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60779
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1977 Sep-Oct;(5):29-30
Publication Type
Article

What factors are of importance for infants' use of health and medical care during the first 18 months?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59186
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1996 Sep;14(3):171-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
A. Håkansson
H. Cars
C. Petersson
B. Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Teleborg Health Centre, Växjö, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1996 Sep;14(3):171-6
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services - utilization
Female
Humans
Infant
Mothers
Parity
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Regression Analysis
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study factors of importance for infants' use of health and medical care. DESIGN: We studied the medical records of the mother during pregnancy (at the health centre, at the antenatal clinics, and at the department of obstetrics and gynaecology) and of her infant during the first 18 months of life (at the health centre, at the child health clinic, and at the departments of paediatrics and oto-rhino-laryngology). We also interviewed the mother when her infant was 18 months old. SETTING: Teleborg health centre, Växjö, southern Sweden. SUBJECTS: 206 infants and their mothers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Medical visits, to doctor or district nurse, during the infants' first 18 months of life, and factors of potential importance for those visits. RESULTS: A stepwise linear multiple regression analysis showed that the following factors were of importance for the infant's use of health and medical care: number of mother's visits to the health and medical services during pregnancy, mother being a primipara, and mother being a blue-collar worker. The model (12.98 + 0.52* (no. of mother's visits) + 2.19 (if primipara) + 1.48 (if blue-collar worker)) was able to explain 8.6% of the number of infant's visits. CONCLUSION: The studied factors explained only a minor part of the infants' use of health and medical care.
PubMed ID
8885030 View in PubMed
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Health and use of health services of children exposed to violence in their families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187674
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93(6):416-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Judee E Onyskiw
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Perinatal Research Centre, #4510 Children's Centre, Royal Alexandra Hospital, 10240 Kingsway Avenue, Edmonton, AB T5H 3V9. jonyskiw@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93(6):416-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
Domestic Violence
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Abstract
To obtain baseline data on the health status and use of health services of children exposed to violence in their families.
The study used data from the first cycle of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (1994/95). According to parental reports, 8.6% of children (n = 1,648; representing 329,657 children) aged 2 to 11 years witnessed some violence in their families. They were compared to children who were reported to have never witnessed any violence at home.
Children exposed to domestic violence had lower health status and more conditions or health problems which limited their participation in normal age-related activities than children in non-violent families. Despite this, they had no more contacts with family practitioners in the previous year and even fewer contacts with pediatricians than comparison children. They did, however, have more contacts with "other medical doctors," public health nurses, child welfare workers, and other therapists than comparison children. In addition, more child witnesses regularly used prescription medication than children not exposed to violence at home.
These baseline findings suggest that exposure to domestic violence has an adverse impact on children's health and use of health services. As future cycles become available, these children will be followed to determine the long-term impact on these outcomes.
PubMed ID
12448862 View in PubMed
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Morbidity in Canadian Indian and non-Indian children in the first year of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243495
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Feb 1;126(3):249-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1982
Author
S E Evers
C G Rand
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Feb 1;126(3):249-52
Date
Feb-1-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child Health Services - utilization
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Ethnic Groups
Health status
Hospitalization
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Morbidity
Abstract
A cohort study of health status was undertaken to determine the patterns of morbidity in the first year of life for Indian and non-Indian infants living in southern Ontario. The annual incidence of office-reported health problems was 8.0 episodes for the 99 Indians and 4.5 for the 316 non-Indians studied. The risk of illness of most diagnostic categories was more than 1.5 times greater and the rate of hospital admission 4 times greater for the Indian infants. There was no difference between the two cohorts in the rates of visits to hospital emergency departments. The main cause of illness in both cohorts was respiratory tract infection; lower respiratory tract infections, particularly pneumonia, were a major health problem among the Indian infants. Only 36% of the Indian infants compared with 68% of the non-Indian infants attended five or more well-baby examinations. Part of the difference in morbidity between the Indian and non-Indian infants may be attributed to environmental factors, health care behaviour and geographic constraints.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health Nations Health. 1966 Aug;56(8):1232-415950713
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Feb 4;96(5):265-84959789
Cites: Pediatrics. 1969 Feb;43(2):173-825763855
Cites: J Pediatr. 1971 Mar;78(3):407-145101437
Cites: Br Med J. 1974 Apr 27;2(5912):201-44832237
Cites: Lancet. 1974 Nov 2;2(7888):1031-44138891
Cites: Br J Prev Soc Med. 1976 Dec;30(4):203-121009269
Cites: J Pediatr. 1977 May;90(5):726-9856961
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Feb 3;120(3):295-8106948
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1978 Dec;7(6):1185-90748492
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1979 May 5;120(9):1116, 1119, 1121445307
Cites: J Pediatr. 1979 Nov;95(5 Pt 1):685-9490234
Cites: Pediatrics. 1967 Aug;40(2):188-955006583
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1963 Jun 13;268:1334-813970724
PubMed ID
7059900 View in PubMed
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Utilization of Child Health Services during the first 18 months of life: aspects of health surveillance in Swedish preschool children based on information in health records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33694
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1998 Sep;87(9):996-1002
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
E. Hagelin
K. Jackson
K. Wikblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University Children's Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1998 Sep;87(9):996-1002
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services - utilization
Clinical Protocols
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Medical Records
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate some aspects of care given within the preventive Child Health Services (CHS) during the first 18 months of life. A national random sample performed on child health records of 172 Swedish preschool children born between 1982 and 1987 was analysed regarding services recorded as having been provided and used within and beyond the national programme of health surveillance. Most families had made visits within the core programme of health surveillance to an optimal or at least sufficient extent. First-time parents visited the CHS more frequently than did more experienced parents. Procedures within the programme, such as growth monitoring, hip examination and immunizations, were documented to have been optimally performed on a majority of the children. Conversely, screening for hearing impairment and assessment of developmental milestones were performed less frequently, as were health information and postnatal parental education. To improve the quality of care, national recommendations ought to be more specific regarding both the performance and the documentation of the service.
PubMed ID
9764897 View in PubMed
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102 records – page 1 of 11.