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[Pediatric preventive medicine in the primary health service. III. Examination of children by the physician - findings and follow-up]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40917
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1980 Oct 20;142(43):2864-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1980

[Infant prophylaxis in Denmark, 7. What good do preventive efforts really do?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40674
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1981 Sep 9;81(35):16-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-9-1981

[Social inequalities in child health status]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37539
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Oct 1;152(40):2910-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1990
Author
B E Holstein
H. Ito
P. Due
Author Affiliation
Institut for Social Medicin, Københavns Universitet.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Oct 1;152(40):2910-3
Date
Oct-1-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Comparative Study
Demography
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Morbidity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Abstract
The article describes the health situation in relation to demographic and social class variables in a sample of 1,671 schoolchildren aged 11, 13 and 15 years in Denmark. The proportions assessing their health as excellent, good, fair, or poor were 47%, 39%, 13%, and 1%, respectively. 22% reported daily symptoms and 74% weekly symptoms (20% one symptom a week, 54% two or more symptoms). During one week, 50% suffered from bad moods, 37% insomnia, 30% depression, 26% headaches, 22% nervousness, 19% back pain, 14% abdominal pain, and 12% vertigo. 37% had used medical drugs during the last month, most frequently for headaches (25%), colds (11%), coughs (9%) and abdominal pain (8%). Girls showed poorer self-assessed health than boys, more symptoms and more use of medication. The youngest pupils had the most frequent symptoms and the oldest least. There were no health differences when place of residence or family composition were considered, but there were clear social class differences. Pupils from the lowest social class and pupils whose parents were not included in the social class classification (e.g. disability pensioners) had the poorest self-assessed health, the most frequent symptoms and the highest use of medication.
PubMed ID
2219529 View in PubMed
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