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8 records – page 1 of 1.

[Are pediatricians not needed in private practice?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35202
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Aug 30;115(20):2583
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1995
Author
P. Eskeland
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Aug 30;115(20):2583
Date
Aug-30-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services - manpower
Child, Preschool
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Norway
Pediatrics - manpower
Private Practice
PubMed ID
7676426 View in PubMed
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[Chronically ill and disabled children--a challenge for health services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32213
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 20;121(8):898
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2001

[The need for neonatal service in a central hospital. Assessed by a 1 year material]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60384
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1983 Sep 30;103(27):1861-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1983

[Imported hepatitis epidemic. Is the health control of adopted children from developing countries satisfactory?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43528
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1972 Dec 30;92(35):2415-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-30-1972

[Health status survey in a district with many immigrant children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34323
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Mar 20;117(8):1086-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1997
Author
E K Grøholt
K K Lie
P T Olsen
R. Nordhagen
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for samfunnsmedisin, Statens institutt for folkehelse, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Mar 20;117(8):1086-9
Date
Mar-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services
Child Nutrition
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Food Habits
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Preventive Health Services
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In Norway, prophylactic child health care is organized through local mother and child clinics, each of which serves a given population. This study summarizes the findings from the routine check-up of four-year-olds in a district with a high proportion of immigrant families. The sample consisted of 70 children, 33 of them from immigrant families. The ordinary check-up was supplemented by information obtained by means of a questionnaire, which was filled in by the public health nurse and the doctor in consultation with the parents. A validated scale, or checklist (BCL), for ordinary behavioural problems among pre-school children was also included. The findings must be interpreted with caution, one reason being the large socio-economic differences between the immigrant and the Norwegian families included in the study. Nevertheless, the difference between the eating habits of the two groups of children was striking, in spite of the emphasis placed on diet at the clinic. Another important finding was the poor knowledge of Norwegian among the immigrant children, which was obviously associated with the poor language skills of the mothers. Therefore, an important element of the preventive health work among immigrant children should be to encourage the mothers to attend courses in Norwegian.
PubMed ID
9148474 View in PubMed
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[Health problems among immigrant children in Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32257
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):715-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2001
Author
L. Brunvand
R. Brunvatne
Author Affiliation
Barnesenteret, Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. leif.brunvand@ulleval.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):715-8
Date
Feb-28-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Communication
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - diagnosis - ethnology - therapy
Health status
Humans
Infant
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - ethnology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology - ethnology
Nutrition Disorders - diagnosis - ethnology - therapy
Refugees - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There are approximately 54,500 immigrant children (
PubMed ID
11293357 View in PubMed
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[Medical problems and needs of follow-up in a group of children with mild cerebral palsy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32085
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 May 20;121(13):1566-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2001
Author
M. Mork
Author Affiliation
m-mork@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 May 20;121(13):1566-9
Date
May-20-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Cerebral Palsy - complications - physiopathology - rehabilitation - therapy
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Norway
Orthopedics - statistics & numerical data
Pediatrics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is no specialized health service for routine follow-up for ambulatory children with cerebral palsy in Rogaland county. Our aim was to investigate the kind of medical problems these children had and whether these problems were discovered by the health services. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 37 children with cerebral palsy born 1987-1992 were investigated. They were all independent walkers without mental retardation at the time of selection. The majority had spastic hemiplegia or spastic diplegia. Their parents were interviewed and the children underwent a neurological examination. RESULTS: Orthopedic problems such as scoliosis, hip abnormalities, tight tendons and muscles, and leg length discrepancy were not discovered by the local health service. The children had a high incidence of epilepsy, visual disorders and minor speech problems. Minor learning difficulties were frequent. INTERPRETATION: Children with mild cerebral palsy have specific problems and need the attention of neuropediatricians in order to establish the primary and secondary problems involved.
PubMed ID
11446039 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.