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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Royal College celebrates Year of the Child.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246624
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1979 Dec;45(12):645-76
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Dec-1979
Author
C L Lavelle
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1979 Dec;45(12):645-76
Date
Dec-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Health Services
Congresses as topic
Dental Care
Humans
PubMed ID
41629 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Discussions on reports presented at the joint session of the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Academy of Pedagogical Sciences of the USSR on "Health and education of preschool children" in Gorky, September 5-7, 1978].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247942
Source
Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR. 1979;(10):71-9
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1979

[About All-Russia Congress "Pediatric Cardiology 2002", Moscow, May 29-31, 2002].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184113
Source
Kardiologiia. 2003;43(3):82-3
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2003

[Conference of the representatives of European Socialist countries regarding health care, development and upbringing of children in the first 3 years of life (Kiev September 27-30, 1977)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41358
Source
Pediatr Pol. 1979 Jun;54(6):677-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Jun-1979

DISCOVERING FRUGAL INNOVATIONS THROUGH DELIVERING EARLY CHILDHOOD HOME-VISITING INTERVENTIONS IN LOW-RESOURCE TRIBAL COMMUNITIES.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299170
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):276-286
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Date
05-2018
Author
Allison Barlow
Judy A McDaniel
Farha Marfani
Anne Lowe
Cassie Keplinger
Moushumi Beltangady
Novalene Goklish
Author Affiliation
Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health.
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):276-286
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Child Health Services - economics
Child, Preschool
Culturally Competent Care - economics - methods
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - economics
House Calls - economics
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Needs Assessment
New Mexico
Poverty - economics
Washington
Abstract
Early childhood home-visiting has been shown to yield the greatest impact for the lowest income, highest disparity families. Yet, poor communities generally experience fractured systems of care, a paucity of providers, and limited resources to deliver intensive home-visiting models to families who stand to benefit most. This article explores lessons emerging from the recent Tribal Maternal and Infant Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) legislation supporting delivery of home-visiting interventions in low-income, hard-to-reach American Indian and Alaska Native communities. We draw experience from four diverse tribal communities that participated in the Tribal MIECHV Program and overcame socioeconomic, geographic, and structural challenges that called for both early childhood home-visiting services and increased the difficulty of delivery. Key innovations are described, including unique community engagement, recruitment and retention strategies, expanded case management roles of home visitors to overcome fragmented care systems, contextual demands for employing paraprofessional home visitors, and practical advances toward streamlined evaluation approaches. We draw on the concept of "frugal innovation" to explain how the experience of Tribal MIECHV participation has led to more efficient, effective, and culturally informed early childhood home-visiting service delivery, with lessons for future dissemination to underserved communities in the United States and abroad.
PubMed ID
29800487 View in PubMed
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LESSONS LEARNED AND NEXT STEPS FOR BUILDING KNOWLEDGE ABOUT TRIBAL MATERNAL, INFANT, AND EARLY CHILDHOOD HOME VISITING.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299177
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):358-365
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Date
05-2018
Author
Corrie B Whitmore
Michelle Sarche
Cathy Ferron
John Moritsugu
Jenae G Sanchez
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage.
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):358-365
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
House Calls
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal health services
Needs Assessment
New Mexico
Pregnancy
Washington
Young Adult
Abstract
Authors in this Special Issue of the Infant Mental Health Journal shared the work of the first three cohorts of Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) grantees funded by the Administration for Children and Families. Since 2010, Tribal MIECHV grantees have served families and children prenatally to kindergarten entry in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities across the lower 48 United States and Alaska. Articles highlighted challenges and opportunities that arose as grantees adapted, enhanced, implemented, and evaluated their home-visiting models. This article summarizes nine lessons learned across the articles in this Special Issue. Lessons learned address the importance of strengths-based approaches, relationship-building, tribal community stakeholder involvement, capacity-building, alignment of resources and expectations, tribal values, adaptation to increase cultural and contextual attunement, indigenous ways of knowing, community voice, and sustainability. Next steps in Tribal MIECHV are discussed in light of these lessons learned.
PubMed ID
29767439 View in PubMed
Less detail

APPROACHES TO THE EVALUATION OF CULTURAL ADAPTATIONS OF HOME VISITING IN TRIBAL COMMUNITIES.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299178
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):347-357
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Date
05-2018
Author
Aleta Meyer
Erin Geary
Debra Heath
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Melina Salvador
Jenae Sanchez
Nancy Whitesell
Author Affiliation
U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):347-357
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
House Calls
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal health services
Needs Assessment
New Mexico
Pregnancy
Washington
Young Adult
Abstract
The research that underlies evidence-based practices is often based on relatively homogenous study samples, thus limiting our ability to understand how the study findings apply in new situations as well as our understanding of what might need to be adapted. In a preliminary effort to address those gaps, the requirements for the Tribal Maternal Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) included the expectation that grantees design and implement rigorous evaluations to address local priorities and to help build the knowledge base regarding the use of evidence-based home-visiting programs in tribal communities. A priority that emerged across many Tribal MIECHV grantees was to determine the added benefit of the cultural adaptations that they were making to their home-visiting programs. While there is literature to describe recommended processes for making cultural adaptations to evidence-based programs themselves, there are very few guidelines for evaluating these adaptations. In this article, we review the varied evaluation approaches utilized by Tribal MIECHV grantees and provide three case examples of how evaluators and tribal communities worked together to articulate evaluation questions and choose appropriate and feasible evaluation designs. The lessons derived from these Tribal MIECHV evaluation experiences have implications for the role of the evaluator in diverse communities across the country evaluating home visiting and other evidence-based practices in settings characterized by unique cultural contexts.
PubMed ID
29767435 View in PubMed
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MEASUREMENT ISSUES IN HOME-VISITING RESEARCH WITHIN TRIBAL COMMUNITIES: CHALLENGES AND STRATEGIES.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299188
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):326-334
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Date
05-2018
Author
Nancy Rumbaugh Whitesell
Marc Bolan
Julianna C Chomos
Debra Heath
Jon Miles
Melina Salvador
Corrie Whitmore
Allison Barlow
Author Affiliation
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):326-334
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
House Calls
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal health services
Needs Assessment
New Mexico
Pregnancy
Washington
Young Adult
Abstract
In this article, Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) grantees share strategies they have developed and adopted to address the most common barriers to effective measurement (and thus to effective evaluation) encountered in the course of implementation and evaluation of their home-visiting programs. We identify key challenges in measuring outcomes in Tribal MIECHV Programs and provide practical examples of various strategies used to address these challenges within diverse American Indian and Alaska Native cultural and contextual settings. Notably, high-quality community engagement is a consistent thread throughout these strategies and fundamental to successful measurement in these communities. These strategies and practices reflect the experiences and innovative solutions of practitioners working on the ground to deliver and evaluate intervention programs to tribal communities. They may serve as models for getting high-quality data to inform intervention while working within the constraints and requirements of program funding. The utility of these practical solutions extends beyond the Tribal MIECHV grantees and offers the potential to inform a broad array of intervention evaluation efforts in tribal and other community contexts.
PubMed ID
29726610 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevention of Childhood Obesity in Child Health Services: Follow-Up of the PRIMROSE Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298638
Source
Child Obes. 2018 Feb/Mar; 14(2):99-105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Johanna Enö Persson
Benjamin Bohman
Per Tynelius
Finn Rasmussen
Ata Ghaderi
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm, Sweden .
Source
Child Obes. 2018 Feb/Mar; 14(2):99-105
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Diet
Educational Status
Exercise
Feeding Behavior
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Infant
Male
Motivational Interviewing - methods
Parents - psychology
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Primary prevention - methods
Risk
Sweden
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Childhood obesity is an urgent public health concern, and there's a need for long-term, high-quality, primary prevention trials targeting parents of young children. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the long-term effect of a parental support program based on motivational interviewing (MI).
A cluster randomized controlled trial was carried out in eight Swedish counties. Participating families (N?=?1355) were enrolled when the child was 9 months old, and participated in nine sessions during ~39 months. The aim was to pomote healthy food and physical activity (PA) habits using MI and principles from cognitive behavioral therapy. Nurses in Swedish child health services delivered the intervention, and the control group received usual healthcare. The current study was a 1-year follow-up of effects on children's weight-related measures. Regression analyses were conducted using generalized estimating equations, including analyses to investigate potential parental moderators of the effect.
There were no statistically significant intervention effects at follow-up [BMI difference?=?-0.13, p?=?0.29, overweight relative risk (RR)?=?0.96, p?=?0.78, obesity RR?=?0.57, p?=?0.20]. Maternal waist circumference and unhealthy eating and paternal PA moderated the effect, but effects were small and failed to reach statistical significance after correction for multiple comparisons.
A parent-focused primary prevention intervention based on MI delivered within child health services did not result in effects at 1-year follow-up. The results were in line with those obtained at post-assessment and indicated no late onset of effect. Further studies exploring individual and contextual factors influencing the outcome are called for.
PubMed ID
29232526 View in PubMed
Less detail

METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR HOME-VISITING RESEARCH IN TRIBAL COMMUNITIES.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299180
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):303-311
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Date
05-2018
Author
M Rebecca Kilburn
Kate Lyon
Cyndi Anderson
Pamela Gutman
Nancy Rumbaugh Whitesell
Author Affiliation
RAND Corporation.
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):303-311
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
House Calls
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal health services
Needs Assessment
New Mexico
Pregnancy
Research Design
Washington
Young Adult
Abstract
Drawing on previous studies and the collective experience of conducting rigorous evaluations as part of the Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting grants, we outline methodological considerations that will inform future research in tribal communities, particularly in the area of home visiting. The methodological issues we discuss are study design choices, measurement and data collection, and including community members in all aspects of the research.
PubMed ID
29767412 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.