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40 records – page 1 of 4.

[Development of childrens health services-a process]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41067
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Mar 19;77(12):1119-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-19-1980

The Greater Vancouver Mental Health Service Society: 20 years' experience in urban community mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220978
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Jun;38(5):308-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
N. Sladen-Dew
D A Bigelow
R. Buckley
S. Bornemann
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Jun;38(5):308-14
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Child
Child Health Services - trends
Community Mental Health Services - trends
Deinstitutionalization - trends
Family Therapy - trends
Forecasting
Health Services for the Aged - trends
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Patient Care Team - trends
Social Adjustment
Societies, Medical - trends
Urban Health - trends
Abstract
Caring for people in the community with persistent and disabling mental illnesses presents a major challenge to government, planners and mental health professionals. The success with which mentally disabled people are integrated into community life says much about the society in which we live. This article describes the experience of the Greater Vancouver Mental Health Service Society in offering community-based mental health services to persons with schizophrenia and other major mental disorders over the past 20 years. The key to its success lies in a decentralized, relatively non hierarchical organizational structure which allows committed and skilled multidisciplinary teams to work with patients and their families in their community. The resulting services are fully integrated within the fabric of the community and are responsive to local needs. Partnerships among professionals, patients, families and community agencies result in work that is creative, productive and effective.
PubMed ID
8348468 View in PubMed
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[About All-Russia Congress "Pediatric Cardiology 2002", Moscow, May 29-31, 2002].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184113
Source
Kardiologiia. 2003;43(3):82-3
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2003
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1992 May;37(4):228-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992

Child neurology in Russia: development of the traditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203741
Source
Brain Dev. 1998 Oct;20(7):543-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
A. Petroukhin
Author Affiliation
Child Neurology Department, Russian State Medical University, Moscow.
Source
Brain Dev. 1998 Oct;20(7):543-6
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - trends
Humans
Neurology - trends
Pediatrics - trends
Russia
PubMed ID
9840677 View in PubMed
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'I felt a little bubbly in my tummy': eliciting pre-schoolers' accounts of their health visit using a computer-assisted interview method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277470
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2016 Jan;42(1):87-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
P. Bokström
K. Fängström
R. Calam
S. Lucas
A. Sarkadi
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2016 Jan;42(1):87-97
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Health Services - trends
Child, Preschool
Emotions
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Sweden
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
In the health care services, children's rights to participate in all matters that concern them are considered important. However, in practice this can be challenging with young children. In My Shoes (IMS) is a computer-assisted interview tool developed to help children talk about their experiences. The aim of the study was to evaluate the IMS' ability to elicit pre-schoolers' subjective experiences and accurate accounts of a routine health visit as well as the children's engagement in the interview process.
Interviews were conducted with 23 children aged 4-5?years, 2-4?weeks after their health visit. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a method inspired by Content Analysis to evaluate IMS's ability to elicit accounts about subjective experiences. Accurate accounts were assessed by comparing the transcribed interviews with the filmed visits at the child health centre. The children's engagement was defined by the completion and length of the interviews, and the children's interaction with the software.
All children gave accounts about their subjective experiences, such as their emotional state during the visit, available toys or rewards they received. All children related to the correct event, they all named at least one person who was present and 87% correctly named at least one examination procedure. The majority of children (91%) completed the interview, which lasted 17-39?min (M?=?24), and 96% interacted with the IMS software.
IMS was feasible to help children describe their health care experiences, in both detail and depth. The children interacted with the software and maintained their interest for an extended period of time.
PubMed ID
26564782 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.