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50 records – page 1 of 5.

Literature review shows that fathers are still not receiving the support they want and need from Swedish child health professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280997
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2016 Sep;105(9):1014-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Michael B Wells
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2016 Sep;105(9):1014-23
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child Health Services
Fathers - psychology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Sweden
Abstract
Sweden has a reputation for gender equality, and its child health services seek to support both parents. However, this meta-ethnographic analysis of 62 studies from 2000 to 2015 covering prenatal clinics, labour and birth wards, postnatal wards and child health centres found programmes had not been designed around paternal needs. Therefore, despite the policy change nearly 50 years ago to include both parents, fathers were still not fully accepted and supported.
To provide fathers in Sweden with greater support throughout the child health field, organisational changes should be considered, as this could provide further beneficial outcomes for children, families and society.
PubMed ID
27310679 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children's mental health: caregivers' concerns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249681
Source
Can Ment Health. 1977 Sep;25(3):17-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1977

Swedish child health nurses' views of early father involvement: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115021
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Jul;102(7):755-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Michael B Wells
Gabriella Varga
Birgitta Kerstis
Anna Sarkadi
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. michael.wells@kbh.uu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Jul;102(7):755-61
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Community Health Centers
Fathers
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Nurses - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To explore Swedish child health nurses' views on their role of involving fathers at the Child Health Centres (CHCs).
Interviews with 17 experienced Swedish Child Health nurses were recorded, transcribed and analysed using systematic text condensation. Following the first analysis, the transtheoretical model of behavioural change was used to interpret the results.
Four themes emerged during the analysis: (1) the nurses' own agenda; (2) nurses' opinion about the father's role; (3) nurses' gatekeeping; and (4) wanting more father involvement. Most nurses were in the precontemplation stage according to the transtheoretical model when they expressed their roles as nurses (Theme 1), how they perceived the father's role within the family (Theme 2) and how they actively encouraged mothers, but not fathers, to visit the CHCs (Theme 3/Mothers are our priority). Nurses in the contemplation stage started to consider involving fathers in the CHCs (Theme 3/The gate is closed...). Still others were in the preparation (Theme 4/Fathers are worthy of change) and action stages (Theme 4/Active in involving fathers), respectively.
Child Health nurses place more emphasis on engaging mothers than fathers in the services. To increase father involvement, nurses need support to become aware, initiate and maintain action.
PubMed ID
23551155 View in PubMed
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[Cooperation between dental health service and nursing care. Interview with nurses taking part in dental health information]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75902
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1980 Apr;90(6):187-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1980

[Reduced number of home visits in child health care. Nurses' attitudes determine the development of the service].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138079
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Nov 24-30;107(47):2968-71
Publication Type
Article

Managing parental groups during early childhood: New challenges faced by Swedish child health-care nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273282
Source
J Child Health Care. 2015 Sep;19(3):381-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Åsa Lefèvre
Lundqvist Pia
Drevenhorn Eva
Hallström Inger
Source
J Child Health Care. 2015 Sep;19(3):381-91
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child Health Services
Health promotion
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Internet
Parents - education
Pediatric Nursing - education
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Teaching
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe child health centre (CHC) nurses' views of managing parental groups during early childhood. All 311 CHC nurses working within the Swedish CHC system in one county were asked to complete a web-based questionnaire. Findings showed that although the CHC nurses were experienced, several found group leadership challenging and difficult. The need for specialized groups for young parents, single parents and parents whose first language was not Swedish was identified by 57% of the nurses. The CHC nurses found the participation of fathers in their parental groups to be low (an estimate of 10-20%), and 30% of the nurses made special efforts to make the fathers participate. Education in group dynamics and group leadership can strengthen CHC nurses in managing parental groups. It is recommended that specialized parental groups are organized by a few family centres so CHC nurses can develop their skill in managing such groups.
PubMed ID
24298189 View in PubMed
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Career choices: a comparison of two occupational therapy practice groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195506
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2001 Feb;68(1):29-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
S. Wilkins
C. Rosenthal
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, IAHS, 4th floor, 1400 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 1C7. swilkins@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2001 Feb;68(1):29-40
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Career Choice
Child
Child Health Services
Decision Making
Health Services for the Aged - manpower
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Therapy - manpower
Abstract
The increasing number of elderly people in the population and their greater use of the health care system require an increasing number of health care providers to work with older adults. A shortage of health care professionals to provide this care, as well as a reluctance to provide such care have been reported in the literature. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate how occupational therapists decide to work with older adults. Using a comparative approach, 40 occupational therapists were interviewed, 20 working in gerontology and 20 working in paediatrics. The findings indicate that social characteristics and experiences of the individual, as well as the context of work are important influences for practice choice decisions. Mapping of career paths led to the development of a typology to further describe the different influences involved in the career choices of these occupational therapists. Recommendations related to education and practice provide practical means by which to implement change.
PubMed ID
11233686 View in PubMed
Less detail

Rules and resources: a structuration approach to understanding the coordination of children's inpatient health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80208
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2006 Nov;56(3):325-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Beringer Antonia J
Fletcher Margaret E
Taket Ann R
Author Affiliation
Centre for Child & Adolescent Health, University of the West of England, Hampton House, Cotham Hill, Bristol, UK. antonia.beringer@uwe.ac.uk
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2006 Nov;56(3):325-35
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child Welfare
Child, Hospitalized
Cooperative Behavior
Denmark
Empirical Research
Great Britain
Humans
Inpatients
Interprofessional Relations
Models, Theoretical
Personnel, Hospital
Abstract
AIM: This paper presents findings from a multi-method study exploring the process of care coordination in children's inpatient health care. BACKGROUND: Existing work on care coordination is typified by "black-box" type studies that measure inputs to and outcomes of care coordination roles and practices, without addressing the process of coordination. METHOD: Using questionnaires, interviews and observation to collect data in multiple sites in the United Kingdom and Denmark between 1999 and 2005, the study gathered the perceptions of staff and compared these with observed practice. Giddens' structuration theory was used to provide an analytical and explanatory framework. FINDINGS: Current care coordination practice is diverse and inconsistent. It involves a wide range of clinical and non-clinical staff, many of whom perceive a lack of clarity about who should perform specific coordination activities. Staff draw upon a wide range of different material and non-material resources in coordinating care, the use of which is governed by largely tacit and informal rules. CONCLUSIONS: Care coordination can be usefully conceptualized as a "structurated" process--one that is continually produced and reproduced by staff using rules and resources to "instantiate" or bring about care coordination through action. Potentially negative implications of this are manifested in diversity and inconsistency in care coordination practice. However, positive aspects such as the opportunity this provides to tailor care to the needs of the individual patient can be realized.
PubMed ID
17042811 View in PubMed
Less detail

User and carer involvement in child and adolescent mental health services: a Norwegian staff perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151649
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2009 Jul;36(4):265-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
J. Richter
S. Halliday
L I Grømer
R. Dybdahl
Author Affiliation
Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Regions East and South, Nydalen, P. O. Box 4623, 0405 Oslo, Norway. jrichterj@web.de
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2009 Jul;36(4):265-77
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Child Health Services
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mental disorders
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Abstract
It has been suggested that user involvement in heath care leads to improved services. The aim of the study was to explore attitudes towards user involvement of staff employed in Norwegian Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). Most of the investigated mental health service staff expressed the opinion that users should be involved in the planning of their own treatment and generally have a positive attitude towards user involvement. Skepticism was related to some aspects of involvement and does not contradict their generally positive attitude towards user involvement.
PubMed ID
19350380 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The awareness of pediatricians about ethical legal issues of medical care provision].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291374
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2016 May-Jun; 24(3):132-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
N V Polunina
I A Shmelev
O A Konovalov
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2016 May-Jun; 24(3):132-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Child Advocacy
Child Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Child Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Pediatricians - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Staff Development - methods
Abstract
The implementation of rights of under-age patients in medical institutions in many ways depends on level of awareness of pediatricians about availability and mechanisms of legal guarantees provided to them by law and hence depends quality of medical care of children population. The study was carried out to analyze opinions of pediatricians about issues of implementation of rights of patients. The results are presented concerning sociological survey of 261 pediatricians of the Samarskaia oblast. The study established inadequate awareness of respondents about ethical legal issues of medicine and rate of application of knowledge about legal acts in practical activity. The awareness was higher among pediatricians of younger age with duration of professional work lesser than 10 years. This phenomenon is explained by inclusion of courses of biomedical ethics and medical law in educational programs of medical educational institutions during last decade. The direct dependence is established between awareness of pediatricians about issues of bioethics and the level of their qualification. The most of the respondents consider that the have sufficient level of knowledge about rights of children-patients and their parents related to reservation of medical secrecy, consent or refuse of parents to medical intervention and receiving full information about child's health. The overwhelming majority of pediatricians, independently of professional category and duration of service, provided this right implementing modern informational and collegiate model of interaction with parents of ill child and informed that always obtained their consent about medical care. However, such rights of children were limited by framework of child's health and ability for apprehending information about one's health and prospective medical intervention. All respondents participated in survey insisted that they never disclosed medical secrecy. The development of legal literacy of pediatricians by promoting activities of organizational methodical departments of medical organizations and self-contained studying of normative legal acts.
PubMed ID
29553220 View in PubMed
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50 records – page 1 of 5.