Skip header and navigation

Refine By

231 records – page 1 of 24.

[I have gotten my dream job!. Interview by Kaj Nyman.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73966
Source
Vardfacket. 1988 May 27;12(10):22-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-1988
Author
A B Lindberg
Source
Vardfacket. 1988 May 27;12(10):22-6
Date
May-27-1988
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Health Services
Female
Humans
Pediatric Nursing
Sweden
PubMed ID
3394365 View in PubMed
Less detail

[What do parents think about health centers?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34077
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 30;117(29):4289
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1997
Author
S Z Bratland
M. Steen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 30;117(29):4289
Date
Nov-30-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Health Services
Family Practice
Humans
Norway
Parents
Questionnaires
PubMed ID
9441480 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Report of activities of the public health dentistry 1977]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41596
Source
Tandlakartidningen. 1978 Sep 1;70(17):1011-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1978
Source
Tandlakartidningen. 1978 Sep 1;70(17):1011-3
Date
Sep-1-1978
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Humans
Public Health Dentistry
Sweden
PubMed ID
284613 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Incidence of noninfectious diseases of the digestive organs and the prospects for developing gastroenterological aid to children (based on data from the city of Gorki and Gorki Province]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43535
Source
Pediatriia. 1972 Dec;51(12):49-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1972

[Achievements in efforts to decrease child morbidity and mortality in the Mordovian ASSR].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249558
Source
Pediatriia. 1977 Oct;(10):28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1977

When they talk about motherhood: a qualitative study of three groups' perceptions in a Swedish child health service context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279348
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2016 Jun 24;15:99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-2016
Author
Erik Masao Eriksson
Kristin Eliasson
Andreas Hellström
Sylvia Määttä
Lisa Vaughn
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2016 Jun 24;15:99
Date
Jun-24-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Health Services - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers - psychology
Perception
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
In light of the growing emphasis on individualization in healthcare, it is vital to take the diversity of inhabitants and users into consideration. Thus, identifying shared perceptions among group members may be important in improving healthcare that is relevant to the particular group, but also perceptions of the staff with whom interactions take place. This study investigates how motherhood is perceived among three groups: Somali-born mothers; Swedish-born mothers; and nurses at Swedish child health centers. Inequities in terms of access and satisfaction have previously been identified at the health centers.
Participants in all three groups were asked to finalize two statements about motherhood; one statement about perfect motherhood, another about everyday motherhood. The responses were analyzed using qualitative coding and categorization to identify differences and similarities among the three groups.
The responses to both statements by the three groups included divergences as well as convergences. Overall, biological aspects of motherhood were absent, and respondents focused almost exclusively on social matters. Working life was embedded in motherhood, but only for the Somali-born mothers. The three groups put emphasis on different aspects of motherhood: Somali-born mothers on the community; the Swedish-born mothers on the child; and the nurses on the mother herself. The nurses - and to some extent the Swedish-born mothers - expected the mother to ask for help with the children when needed. However, the Somali-born mothers responded that the mother should be independent, not asking for such help. Nurses, more than both groups of mothers, largely described everyday motherhood in positively charged words or phrases.
The findings of this paper suggest that convergences and divergences in perceptions of motherhood among three groups may be important in equitable access and utilization of healthcare. Individualized healthcare requires nuance and should avoid normative or stereotypical encounters by recognizing social context and needs that are relevant to specific groups of the population.
PubMed ID
27342849 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Health nursing--understanding and methods]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36258
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1993 May 26;93(21):22-3, 29
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-26-1993

Exploring Nurses', Preschool Teachers' and Parents' Perspectives on Information Sharing Using SDQ in a Swedish Setting - A Qualitative Study Using Grounded Theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284738
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0168388
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Elisabet Fält
Anna Sarkadi
Helena Fabian
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0168388
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Nurses
Parents
School Teachers
Sweden
Abstract
Evidence-based methods to identify behavioural problems among children are not regularly used within the Swedish Child healthcare. A new procedure was therefore introduced to assess children through parent- and preschool teacher reports using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). This study aims to explore nurses', preschool teachers' and parents' perspectives of this new information sharing model. Using the grounded theory methodology, semi-structured interviews with nurses (n = 10) at child health clinics, preschool teachers (n = 13) and parents (n = 11) of 3-, 4- and 5-year-old children were collected and analysed between March 2014 and June 2014. The analysis was conducted using constant comparative method. The participants were sampled purposively within a larger trial in Sweden. Results indicate that all stakeholders shared a desire to have a complete picture of the child's health. The perceptions that explain why the stakeholders were in favour of the new procedure-the 'causal conditions' in a grounded theory model-included: (1) Nurses thought that visits after 18-months were unsatisfactory, (2) Preschool teachers wanted to identify children with difficulties and (3) Parents viewed preschool teachers as being qualified to assess children. However, all stakeholders had doubts as to whether there was a reliable way to assess children's behaviour. Although nurses found the SDQ to be useful for their clinical evaluation, they noticed that not all parents chose to participate. Both teachers and parents acknowledged benefits of information sharing. However, the former had concerns about parental reactions to their assessments and the latter about how personal information was handled. The theoretical model developed describes that the causal conditions and current context of child healthcare in many respects endorse the introduction of information sharing. However, successful implementation requires considerable work to address barriers: the tension between normative thinking versus helping children with developmental problems for preschool teachers and dealing with privacy issues and inequity in participation for parents.
Notes
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2006 Apr;16(4):547-5916513996
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;46(8):850-816033633
Cites: Ambul Pediatr. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):347-5117116609
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013 Oct 16;13:96124131587
Cites: Pediatrics. 2015 May;135(5):e1210-925847804
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;66(6):403-1322397524
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2006 Jun;188:547-5316738345
Cites: Med J Aust. 2004 Mar 15;180(6 Suppl):S57-6015012583
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2003;57(5):357-6314522609
Cites: Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev. 2010 Sep;13(3):254-7420589428
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2008 Apr 04;8:10618394152
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Jul 28;323(7306):19111473907
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;48(4):400-319242383
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 Jul;52(7):728-3623800486
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;40(11):1337-4511699809
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2000 Dec;177:534-911102329
Cites: Child Care Health Dev. 2015 Nov;41(6):853-6425707313
Cites: Med J Aust. 2004 Mar 15;180(6 Suppl):S55-615012582
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;46(8):837-4916033632
PubMed ID
28076401 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Maternal and child health care in the Ukraine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40312
Source
Pediatriia. 1982 Dec;(12):11-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1982

231 records – page 1 of 24.