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[Research at child health service centers. Participation in national studies should be included in the agreements].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105081
Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 Dec 4-17;110(49-50):2252
Publication Type
Article

Clinical utility of the Structured Observation of Motor Performance in Infants within the child health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286084
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(7):e0181398
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Kine Johansen
Kristina Persson
Karin Sonnander
Margaretha Magnusson
Anna Sarkadi
Steven Lucas
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(7):e0181398
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Development - physiology
Child Health Services
Female
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Skills - physiology
Motor Skills Disorders - diagnosis
Sweden
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the clinical utility of the Structured Observation of Motor Performance in Infants (SOMP-I) when used by nurses in routine child healthcare by analyzing the nurses' SOMP-I assessments and the actions taken when motor problems were suspected.
Infants from three child health centers in Uppsala County, Sweden, were consecutively enrolled in a longitudinal study. The 242 infants were assessed using SOMP-I by the nurse responsible for the infant as part of the regular well-child visits at as close to 2, 4, 6 and 10 months of age as possible. The nurses noted actions taken such as giving advice, scheduling an extra follow-up or referring the infant to specialized care. The infants' motor development was reassessed at 18 months of age through review of medical records or parental report.
The assessments of level of motor development at 2 and 10 months showed a distribution corresponding to the percentile distribution of the SOMP-I method. Fewer infants than expected were assessed as delayed at 4 and 6 months or deficient in quality at all assessment ages. When an infant was assessed as delayed in level or deficient in quality, the likelihood of the nurse taking actions increased. This increased further if both delay and quality deficit were found at the same assessment or if one or both were found at repeated assessments. The reassessment of the motor development at 18 months did not reveal any missed infants with major motor impairments.
The use of SOMP-I appears to demonstrate favorable clinical utility in routine child healthcare as tested here. Child health nurses can assess early motor performance using this standardized assessment method, and using the method appears to support them the clinical decision-making.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28723929 View in PubMed
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[Big differences in Swedish child health care. Child health care units decide their services--alarming that a national program is missing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130007
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Aug 31-Sep 6;108(35):1618-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
Margaretha Magnusson
Anncharlotte Lindfors
Johanna Tell
Author Affiliation
Barnhälsovårdens länsavdelning, Akademiska barnsjukhuset, Uppsala. margaretha.magnusson@kbh.uu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Aug 31-Sep 6;108(35):1618-21
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Development
Child Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Internet
Mass Screening
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Sweden
PubMed ID
22043616 View in PubMed
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[Reduced number of home visits in child health care. Nurses' attitudes determine the development of the service].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138079
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Nov 24-30;107(47):2968-71
Publication Type
Article

Utilization of child health services, stress, social support and child characteristics in primiparous and multiparous mothers of 18-month-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114929
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Jun;41(4):374-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Dagmar Lagerberg
Margaretha Magnusson
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. dagmar.lagerberg@kbh.uu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Jun;41(4):374-83
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Health Services - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parenting - psychology
Parity
Questionnaires
Social Support
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Abstract
Traditionally, the child health services have laid emphasis on first-time mothers. Some researchers have argued that the needs of multiparous mothers must be considered equally important. The aim of this paper was to analyse parity-related characteristics in pairs of mothers and 18-month-old children.
The study was population-based and cross-sectional. 586 primiparous mothers and 821 mothers with at least one previous child completed a questionnaire. Additional information was extracted from the child health records by the nurses. Data were collected in 2002-2003 and 2004-2005.
Compared to multiparous mothers, primiparous mothers had a higher utilization of child health services. Multiparous mothers scored higher on parental incompetence stress and felt that their work load was more demanding. Multiparous mothers reported less social support, particularly in practical respects such as baby-sitting. They considered their interaction with the child as less satisfactory than did primiparous mothers; their children participated less in shared reading and had a more restricted vocabulary. Fewer multiparous mothers assessed their own and their child's total situation as very good.
The child health services should develop competence and methods to support multiparous mothers and alleviate their workload when caring for several children.
PubMed ID
23563993 View in PubMed
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Organizational differences in early child health care -- mothers' and nurses' experiences of the services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131728
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Mar;26(1):161-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Margaretha Magnusson
Dagmar Lagerberg
Claes Sundelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Section for Paediatrics, Uppsala University, Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. margaretha.magnusson@kbh.uu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2012 Mar;26(1):161-8
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Child Health Services - manpower - organization & administration
Community Health Nursing - manpower - organization & administration
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Infant
Job Satisfaction
Logistic Models
Models, organizational
Pediatric Nursing - education
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate parents' and nurses' perceptions of the child health services (CHS) in relation to whether the nurse worked exclusively with children (focused-child health centre, CHC) vs. with people of all ages (mixed-CHC).
Information about parents' perceptions about the CHS was acquired by a questionnaire intended for the mothers of 18-month-old children. One thousand thirty-nine answered in the baseline 2002-2003 and 996 in the follow-up 2004-2005. The nurses answered a special questionnaire aimed to obtain knowledge about their satisfaction with their work. Eighteen CHCs were chosen from the county of Uppsala and eighteen from other Swedish counties. The CHCs were chosen from areas with poor psycho-social status. The data were collected by questionnaires to mothers and nurses, and the analysis used the chi-square test, t-test and logistic regression. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committees of the universities involved.
Mothers were more satisfied, and the nurses found their work tasks easier, at CHCs where the child health nurse worked exclusively with children, compared with mothers and nurses belonging to CHCs where the nurses provided care to people of all ages.
The findings indicated that nurses working exclusively with children, being able to concentrate their time and knowledge on a specialized field, develop a more solid child health competence. There are strong reasons to consider introducing 'exclusive' CHCs in psycho-socially vulnerable areas, which would probably make the services more effective. However, intensified education may modify the drawbacks of mixed-CHCs.
PubMed ID
21883341 View in PubMed
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'Now I use words like asymmetry and unstable': nurses' experiences in using a standardized assessment for motor performance within routine child health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279457
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2016 Apr;22(2):227-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Kine Johansen
Steven Lucas
Pär Bokström
Kristina Persson
Karin Sonnander
Margaretha Magnusson
Anna Sarkadi
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2016 Apr;22(2):227-34
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Clinical Competence
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Motor Disorders - diagnosis
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
There is an increasing recognition that early intervention is important for children with motor disorders. The use of standardized assessment methods within the Swedish Child Health Services (CHS) may improve early identification of these children and thereby their development and quality of care. Given the key role of nurses within the CHS, we explored their experiences of using a structured assessment of motor performance (SOMP-I) in a clinical setting, and investigated possible barriers and facilitators for implementation of the method within the CHS.
The study was conducted in 2013 in Uppsala County, Sweden. Ten child health nurses participated in two focus group interviews, which were analysed using systematic text condensation.
The analysis yielded three themes: (1) increased knowledge and professional pride - nurses described their desire to provide high-quality care for which SOMP-I was a useful tool; (2) improved parent-provider relationship - nurses felt that using SOMP-I involved both the parents and their infant to a greater extent than routine care; and (3) conditions for further implementation - nurses described that the time and effort needed to master new skills must be considered and practical barriers, such as lack of examination space, resource constraints and difficulties in documenting the assessment must be addressed before implementing the SOMP-I method in routine care.
Child health nurses felt that the SOMP-I method fitted well with their professional role and increased the quality of care provided. However, significant barriers to implementing SOMP-I into routine child health care were described.
PubMed ID
26489378 View in PubMed
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[Surname as a marker of ethnicity. A study from child health services shows that immigrant respective Swedish families seem to be isolated in different ways]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29520
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Jul 25-Aug 7;102(30-31):2145-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dagmar Lagerberg
Margaretha Magnusson
Claes Sundelin
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, enheten för pediatrik. dagmar.lagerberg@kbh.uu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Jul 25-Aug 7;102(30-31):2145-8
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services
Child Welfare - classification - ethnology
Communication
Comparative Study
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Ethnic Groups
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Nuclear Family - ethnology
Preventive Health Services
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Social Isolation
Social Support
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
A practical method was tested for identifying ethnicity through family names in the absence of precise demographic information. In a questionnaire study of children covered by the Swedish child health services in some different counties, all potential participants (the children's mothers) were classified as "Swedish" or "non-Swedish" using family names. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by comparing the scores of two independent raters (Cohen's kappa: 0.89). Cases in which the raters did not agree were settled through discussion. The method's validity was roughly measured by comparing assigned classifications against ethnicity information provided by the 63.8 percent of the mothers who returned the questionnaire (1039 of 1628). Assigned and self-reported classifications were the same in 86.5 percent of the cases. Information from child health services about mothers who had agreed to participate in the study revealed health-related differences between those who returned the questionnaires and those who did not. The family name classification method indicated an ethnic selectivity in drop-out rates, which was helpful in interpreting these health differences.
PubMed ID
16111104 View in PubMed
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Motivational Interviewing to Prevent Childhood Obesity: A Cluster RCT.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283053
Source
Pediatrics. 2016 May;137(5)
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Nora Döring
Ata Ghaderi
Benjamin Bohman
Berit L Heitmann
Christel Larsson
Daniel Berglind
Lena Hansson
Elinor Sundblom
Margaretha Magnusson
Margareta Blennow
Per Tynelius
Lars Forsberg
Finn Rasmussen
Source
Pediatrics. 2016 May;137(5)
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Exercise
Feeding Behavior
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Intention to Treat Analysis
Male
Mothers
Motivational Interviewing
Overweight - epidemiology - therapy
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Prevalence
Primary Prevention
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Waist Circumference
Abstract
The objective was to evaluate a manualized theory-driven primary preventive intervention aimed at early childhood obesity. The intervention was embedded in Swedish child health services, starting when eligible children were 9 to 10 months of age and continuing until the children reached age 4.
Child health care centers in 8 Swedish counties were randomized into intervention and control units and included 1355 families with 1369 infants. Over ~39 months, families in the intervention group participated in 1 group session and 8 individual sessions with a nurse trained in motivational interviewing, focusing on healthy food habits and physical activity. Families in the control group received care as usual. Primary outcomes were children's BMI, overweight prevalence, and waist circumference at age 4. Secondary outcomes were children's and mothers' food and physical activity habits and mothers' anthropometrics. Effects were assessed in linear and log-binominal regression models using generalized estimating equations.
There were no statistically significant differences in children's BMI (ß = -0.11, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.31 to 0.08), waist circumference (ß = -0.48, 95% CI: -0.99 to 0.04), and prevalence of overweight (relative risk = 0.95, 95% CI: 0.69 to 1.32). No significant intervention effects were observed in mothers' anthropometric data or regarding mothers' and children's physical activity habits. There was a small intervention effect in terms of healthier food habits among children and mothers.
There were no significant group differences in children's and mothers' anthropometric data and physical activity habits. There was, however, some evidence suggesting healthier food habits, but this should be interpreted with caution.
PubMed ID
27244793 View in PubMed
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Primary prevention of childhood obesity through counselling sessions at Swedish child health centres: design, methods and baseline sample characteristics of the PRIMROSE cluster-randomised trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264120
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:335
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Nora Döring
Lena M Hansson
Elina Scheers Andersson
Benjamin Bohman
Maria Westin
Margaretha Magnusson
Christel Larsson
Elinor Sundblom
Mikaela Willmer
Margareta Blennow
Berit L Heitmann
Lars Forsberg
Sanna Wallin
Per Tynelius
Ata Ghaderi
Finn Rasmussen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:335
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Health Services - methods
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Counseling - methods
Diet - methods
Exercise
Feeding Behavior
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Infant
Male
Parents - education
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Primary prevention - methods
Program Evaluation - methods
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
Childhood obesity is a growing concern in Sweden. Children with overweight and obesity run a high risk of becoming obese as adults, and are likely to develop comorbidities. Despite the immense demand, there is still a lack of evidence-based comprehensive prevention programmes targeting pre-school children and their families in primary health care settings. The aims are to describe the design and methodology of the PRIMROSE cluster-randomised controlled trial, assess the relative validity of a food frequency questionnaire, and describe the baseline characteristics of the eligible young children and their mothers.
The PRIMROSE trial targets first-time parents and their children at Swedish child health centres (CHC) in eight counties in Sweden. Randomisation is conducted at the CHC unit level. CHC nurses employed at the participating CHC received training in carrying out the intervention alongside their provision of regular services. The intervention programme, starting when the child is 8-9 months of age and ending at age 4, is based on social cognitive theory and employs motivational interviewing. Primary outcomes are children's body mass index and waist circumference at four years. Secondary outcomes are children's and mothers' eating habits (assessed by a food frequency questionnaire), and children's and mothers' physical activity (measured by accelerometer and a validated questionnaire), and mothers' body mass index and waist circumference.
The on-going population-based PRIMROSE trial, which targets childhood obesity, is embedded in the regular national (routine) preventive child health services that are available free-of-charge to all young families in Sweden. Of the participants (n?=?1369), 489 intervention and 550 control mothers (75.9%) responded to the validated physical activity and food frequency questionnaire at baseline (i.e., before the first intervention session, or, for children in the control group, before they reached 10 months of age). The food frequency questionnaire showed acceptable relative validity when compared with an 8-day food diary. We are not aware of any previous RCT, concerned with the primary prevention of childhood obesity through sessions at CHC that addresses healthy eating habits and physical activity in the context of a routine child health services programme.
ISRCTN16991919.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24717011 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.