Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Pediatrics. 1990 Dec;86(6 Pt 2):1027-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
I B Pless
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Pediatrics. 1990 Dec;86(6 Pt 2):1027-32
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Delivery of Health Care - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Policy
Humans
Infant
Mortality
PubMed ID
2243733 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lessons from health trends for systems of child health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220186
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1993 Oct;32(10):586-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
I B Pless
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Westmount, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1993 Oct;32(10):586-90
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Health Services
Delivery of Health Care
Health Care Reform
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Insurance, Health
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
PubMed ID
8261719 View in PubMed
Less detail

The use of preventable adverse outcomes to study the quality of child health care. A new application of case-control research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240758
Source
Med Care. 1984 Mar;22(3):223-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1984
Author
M S Kramer
L. Arsenault
I B Pless
Source
Med Care. 1984 Mar;22(3):223-30
Date
Mar-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child
Child Health Services - standards
Diagnosis
Emergency Service, Hospital
Gastroenteritis - therapy
Humans
Meningitis - therapy
Otitis Media - therapy
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Pediatrics
Pneumonia - therapy
Quality of Health Care
Quebec
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
Because cohort methods are insensitive in detecting rare outcomes, the authors used the more sensitive case-control technique to investigate whether pediatricians or nonpediatric generalists are better able to recognize severe acute illness or to avoid preventable complications. We selected "indicator" outcomes for four types of common acute illness and enrolled patients who had contacted a physician more than 24 hours prior to an index emergency room visit for the same illness. Case (N = 103) were patients with adverse outcomes, i.e. potentially preventable complications or delayed diagnosis, treatment, or referral. Controls (N = 103) were those with acceptable outcomes (uncomplicated illness or prompt diagnosis, treatment, or referral) and were matched according to age, SES, and illness type. The overall results indicate no evidence of better care by pediatricians: prior contract with a pediatrician was associated with an estimated relative risk (omega) of adverse outcome of 1.32 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-2.29). Within the two largest illness categories (gastroenteritis and pneumonia-respiratory), the results were similar: omega = 1.16 (0.68-1.99) and 2.23 (0.82-6.04), respectively. Potential confounders were controlled for by multiple logistic regression analysis, but omega remained virtually unchanged. Nor were the findings altered by elimination of outliers or restriction of "contact" to office visits only. The authors conclude that study pediatricians and generalists provide equivalent acute illness care to children and that the case-control method provides a feasible and highly suitable approach to the study of the quality of medical care.
PubMed ID
6700285 View in PubMed
Less detail

The use of alternative medicine by children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216753
Source
Pediatrics. 1994 Dec;94(6 Pt 1):811-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
L. Spigelblatt
G. Laîné-Ammara
I B Pless
A. Guyver
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Pediatrics. 1994 Dec;94(6 Pt 1):811-4
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Health Services - economics - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Complementary Therapies - economics - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Costs and Cost Analysis
Hospitals, University
Humans
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Patient Satisfaction - economics - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - economics - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Abstract
Alternative medicine (AM) is of growing interest to the general public. Although several studies have been published concerning its use in adults, the use by children is less well known. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency with which alternative medicine is employed in a pediatric population that also uses conventional medicine. A second goal is to investigate the sociodemographic factors that influence the choice of these forms of therapy.
Parents of children consulting the general outpatient clinic of a university hospital completed a self-administered questionnaire asking about previous use of AM for themselves or their children.
Based on 1911 completed questionnaires, 208 children (11%) previously consulted one or more AM practitioners. Chiropractic, homeopathy, naturopathy, and acupuncture together accounted for 84% of use. Children who used AM differed significantly from those who only used conventional medicine in that they were older than the nonusers, their mothers were better educated, and their parents also tended to use AM.
The findings indicate that AM is an aspect of child health care that no longer can be ignored. Being aware of these practices will enable physicians to discuss alternative therapies with parents in order to ensure the continuity of essential conventional treatments.
PubMed ID
7970994 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effectiveness of a home visit to prevent childhood injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193854
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Aug;108(2):382-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
W J King
T P Klassen
J. LeBlanc
A C Bernard-Bonnin
Y. Robitaille
B. Pham
D. Coyle
M. Tenenbein
I B Pless
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. king@cheo.on.ca
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Aug;108(2):382-8
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - economics - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Health Services - economics - standards
Child, Preschool
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
House Calls - economics - utilization
Humans
Infant
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Preventive Health Services - economics - standards
Safety - standards
Wounds and Injuries - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To examine the effectiveness of a home visit program to improve home safety and decrease the frequency of injury in children. We examined the effects of the program on 1) parental injury awareness and knowledge; 2) the extent that families used home safety measures; 3) the rate of injury; and 4) the cost effectiveness of the intervention.
A randomized, controlled trial.
A multicenter trial conducted at 5 hospitals in 4 Canadian urban centers.
Children
PubMed ID
11483803 View in PubMed
Less detail