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Suitability of the lang II random dot stereotest for detecting manifest strabismus in 3-year-old children at child health centres in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32621
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2000 Jul;89(7):824-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
F. Rasmussen
K. Thorén
E. Caines
J. Andersson
P. Tynelius
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. finn.rasmussen@imm.ki.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2000 Jul;89(7):824-9
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Humans
Mass Screening
Random Allocation
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Strabismus - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study is to examine the suitability of the Lang II Random Dot Stereotest for use by district nurses in primary healthcare centres. The Lang Stereotest is an inexpensive method. It is easy to apply, but the child's co-operation is required. Approximately 100 district nurses were given detailed information and instruction by an orthoptist prior to a randomized population-based community trial initiated in 1993. In the county of Uppsala in Sweden, all 4293 children born in 1990 were randomized to one of the following four study groups: intervention, control, reliability or validity. All children were followed from birth to 6.5 y of age with respect to the occurrence of strabismus. The kappa statistic for test-retest reliability among district nurses was 0.65 (95% CI, 0.51-0.80). A validation of the outcomes of district nurses' against orthoptists' examinations using the Lang Stereotest showed a sensitivity of 0.33 (95% CI, 0.09-0.65) and a specificity of 0.85 (0.80-0.89). Of 113 cases of strabismus, 53% were detected within the first 3 y of life. Examination of 1132 3-y-old children using the Lang Stereotest enabled the district nurses to detect 11 new cases of strabismus. Only one of these cases was referred to an orthoptist as a direct consequence of the screening. The Lang Stereotest showed low reliability and low validity in this community trial. It is concluded that the Lang II Random Dot Stereotest is not suitable for the screening of manifest strabismus in unselected populations of 3-y-old children in Sweden, where a large proportion of cases of strabismus is detected during the first 3 y of life.
PubMed ID
10943966 View in PubMed
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Mothers' benefit of a self-care booklet and a self-care educational session at child health centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59975
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1989;29(2):205-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
F. Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1989;29(2):205-12
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Infant care
Mothers
Pamphlets
Program Evaluation
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Sweden
Abstract
Mothers' benefit of a mass-distributed self-care booklet and a self-care educational session about young children's minor illnesses were investigated. The following questions were studied: (1) Do mothers of infants read and benefit from a self-care booklet? (2) Is the mothers' knowledge about self-care improved more if the booklet is supplemented by a self-care educational session? 265 (92%) of 288 randomly sampled Swedish mothers whose first child was 6-12 months of age were interviewed regarding their knowledge about self-care. Shortly thereafter a self-care booklet was mailed to all households in Uppsala county and 6.5 months later a new group of 572 mothers was randomly sampled. Among the 572 mothers, 332 (58%) were randomized to a self-care session organized at child health centres and 240 (42%) were not invited to a session. Of the 572 mothers, 530 (93%) were later interviewed about the booklet, the session and their knowledge about self-care. 69% participated among the mothers randomized to the session. Among these mothers, 99% recalled the booklet and 96% had read the child care section. Among the mothers not invited to the session, 68% recalled the booklet and 60% had read the child care section. The mothers who had read the child care section would follow the recommendations about when to seek (and not to seek) medical care significantly better than those who had not read it (P less than 0.003).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2749302 View in PubMed
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The utilization of formal medical services for young children. The lack of impact of medical professionals in social networks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35461
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1995;100(3):249-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
F. Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Children's University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1995;100(3):249-60
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child Health Services - manpower - utilization
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Interviews
Random Allocation
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the impact of medical professionals in social networks on the use of formal medical care for young children's minor illnesses. 795 Swedish mothers, with only one child 5-15 months of age, were randomly sampled. The mothers were interviewed by telephone and complete interviews were conducted with 92% of them. Of the 795 mothers, 84% had a relative or friend and 24% had a physician or nurse within their social networks whom they could contact for advice and support when their children became ill. No associations were found between the mothers' access to advice and support from medical professionals within their social networks and the number of formal medical contacts for their young children's illnesses. Similarly, no associations were found between the mothers' access to advice and support from lay persons in their social networks and the use of medical services for their children.
PubMed ID
8808188 View in PubMed
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Infrequent attention to dietary and physical activity behaviours in conversations in Swedish child health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116828
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 May;102(5):520-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
B. Bohman
M. Eriksson
M. Lind
A. Ghaderi
L. Forsberg
F. Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. benjamin.bohman@ki.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 May;102(5):520-4
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Behavior
Child Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Diet
Exercise
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Parents
Public Health Surveillance
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate conversations between nurses and parents in Swedish child health services and to assess to what extent attention is directed towards dietary and physical activity behaviours in children.
Twenty-three nurses audio-recorded one session each. Recordings were assessed and topics were classified according to predetermined categories.
The three most frequent topics of conversation concerned physical examinations of the child (30% of session time), talking to the child to establish or maintain contact and interest (15%), and development of language skills (12%). Dietary habits came on fourth place (10%), and physical activity ranked 14 (4%).
Attention to dietary and physical activity behaviours in children is infrequent in Swedish child health services. Concern is raised about the efficacy of prevention efforts against childhood obesity.
PubMed ID
23356388 View in PubMed
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Life table methods applied to use of medical care and of prescription drugs in early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38121
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1989 Jun;43(2):140-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
F. Rasmussen
B. Smedby
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1989 Jun;43(2):140-6
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Life tables
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Physicians - utilization
Prescriptions, Drug
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Life table methods were applied to analyses of longitudinal data on the use of medical care during the first 5 years of life among all 1701 children born in a Swedish semirural municipality. Cumulative proportions of the children who had used particular types of medical care or prescription drugs at least once by certain ages were estimated. By the fifth birthday, 98% had made at least one visit to any physician and 82% at least one visit to a paediatrician. By the fifth birthday at least one prescription for antibiotics had been purchased at a pharmacy by 82%; and 33% had been admitted to inpatient hospital care at least once (excluding immediate postnatal care). Acute conditions and more chronic diseases were also studied using these methods. At least one visit to a physician at a primary health care centre had been made for acute otitis media in 65% of 5 year olds and for atopic dermatitis in 8%.
PubMed ID
2592902 View in PubMed
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