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An evaluation of the paediatric acquired brain injury community outreach programme (PABICOP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166383
Source
Brain Inj. 2006 Oct;20(11):1189-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Janette McDougall
Michelle Servais
Joy Sommerfreund
Ellen Rosen
Jane Gillett
Janice Gray
Sara Somers
Pamela Frid
David Dewit
Lisa Pearlman
Frances Hicock
Author Affiliation
Thames Valley Children's Centre, London, Ontario, Canada. janettem@tvcc.on.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2006 Oct;20(11):1189-205
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Brain Damage, Chronic - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - etiology
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Family - psychology
Family Health
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Male
Ontario
Program Evaluation
Psychometrics
Rehabilitation Centers
Socioeconomic Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine the utility of a coordinated, family/community-focused programme (PABICOP) vs. a standard approach for improving outcomes for children with ABI and their families.
Pre-test-post-test design, with comparison group and follow-up.
Ninety-six children (64 children receiving PABICOP services and 32 children receiving standard care) participated in the study. Measures were completed at baseline and 3 and 12 months later.
Parents/caregivers with more than 10 contacts with PABICOP scored significantly higher on an ABI knowledge quiz than either parents/caregivers with 10 contacts or less or the comparison group at post-test and follow-up. Parents/caregivers with 10 contacts or less with PABICOP reported significantly greater improvements in children's school and total competence on the CBCL than either parents/caregivers with more than 10 contacts or the comparison group at post-test and follow-up.
PABICOP may be more useful for enhancing knowledge of ABI for parents/caregivers and for integrating children into the community over a 1-year period than a standard approach. The amount of service received appears to influence outcomes.
PubMed ID
17123936 View in PubMed
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Parent-held child health records do not improve care: a randomized controlled trial in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80998
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Sep;24(3):186-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Bjerkeli Grøvdal Lillian
Grimsmo Anders
Ivar Lund Nilsen Tom
Author Affiliation
Maternal and Child Health Centre, Molde, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Sep;24(3):186-90
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Child, Preschool
Communication
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Male
Medical Records
Norway
Parents - education
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of a parent-held child health record (PHCHR) that was created by the Norwegian Board of Health with the purpose of introducing this to the whole country. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Maternal and child health centres in 10 municipalities in Norway. SUBJECTS: Parents of 309 children attending the National Preschool Health Surveillance Programme. INTERVENTION: Half of the parents were given a PHCHR and short instructions on how it was expected to be used. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Parent-professional collaboration, healthcare utilization, and parents' knowledge about child health matters and illness. RESULTS: Some 73% of the intervention group used the PHCHR regularly when visiting the health centres, 79% reported that their own writing in the record was helpful, and 92% favoured the PHCHR being permanently adopted. Use of the record did not influence the utilization of healthcare services, parents' knowledge of their child's health, or parents' satisfaction with information or communication with professionals. CONCLUSIONS: The PHCHR was well accepted by parents and professionals but it had no effects on collaboration, healthcare utilization, or other measures that could justify the costs of introducing the record into common use. Therefore, the introduction of a parent-held child health record in Norway is being postponed.
PubMed ID
16923629 View in PubMed
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Non-participation in preventive child health examinations at the general practitioner in Denmark: a register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87339
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2008 Mar;26(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Søndergaard Grethe
Biering-Sørensen Sofie
Michelsen Susan Ishøy
Schnor Ole
Andersen Anne-Marie Nybo
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2008 Mar;26(1):5-11
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mass Screening
Parents - psychology
Preventive Health Services
Registries
Socioeconomic Factors
Treatment Refusal
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of parents and children in families not participating in preventive child health examinations at the general practitioner in a society with free and easy access to healthcare. DESIGN: Population-covering register linkage study. SETTING: Denmark, 2002-2004. SUBJECTS: Two cohorts comprising all children born in Denmark between 1 July 1998 and 30 June 1999 (n =70 891) and in 2002 (n =65 995), respectively. The demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of these children and the adults living in the same household as these were identified through register linkage. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Crude and mutually adjusted odds ratios for non-participation in scheduled preventive child health examinations at the GP (age 5 weeks, 5 months, 12 months, 4 years, and 5 years) according to child characteristics (sex, number of hospitalizations, and older siblings) and parental characteristics (age, educational level, attachment to labour market, ethnicity, household income, and number of adults in the household). RESULTS: Children of young and single parents were less likely to receive a preventive child health examination. Increased odds ratios for non-participation were found for children of parents outside the labour market, with low educational level, and especially for the combination of these. Non-participation increased with decreasing household income and with the number of older siblings. CONCLUSION: Despite the fact that Denmark has free and easy access to the GP, the utilization of preventive child health examinations is lower among the more deprived part of the population.
PubMed ID
18297556 View in PubMed
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Impact of intimate partner violence on children's well-child care and medical home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87421
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Mar;121(3):e473-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Bair-Merritt Megan H
Crowne Sarah Shea
Burrell Lori
Caldera Debra
Cheng Tina L
Duggan Anne K
Author Affiliation
Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. mbairme1@jhmi.edu
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Mar;121(3):e473-80
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Caregivers
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Child Health Services - utilization
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Pregnancy
Probability
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Intimate partner violence has been linked to poor child health. A continuous relationship with a primary care pediatric provider can help to detect intimate partner violence and connect families with needed services. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between intimate partner violence and (1) maternal report of a regular site for well-child care, (2) maternal report of a primary pediatric provider, (3) well-child visits in the first year of life, (4) up-to-date immunizations at 2 years of age, (5) maternal report of medical neglect, and (6) maternal report of the pediatric provider-caregiver relationship. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study evaluated data from 209 at-risk families participating in the evaluation of the Healthy Families Alaska program. Research staff interviewed mothers near the time of an index child's birth and again at the child's second birthday. Medical charts were abstracted for information on well-child visits and immunizations. RESULTS: Mothers who disclosed intimate partner violence at the initial interview (n = 62) were significantly less likely to report a regular site for well-child care or a primary pediatric provider. In multivariable models, children of mothers who disclosed intimate partner violence tended to be less likely to have the recommended 5 well-child visits within the first year of life and were significantly less likely to be fully immunized at 2 years of age. Differences in medical neglect were not statistically significant. Of mothers who reported a specific primary pediatric provider, those with intimate partner violence histories trusted this provider less and tended to rate less favorably pediatric provider-caregiver communication and the overall quality of the pediatric provider-caregiver relationship. CONCLUSIONS: Future research should explore effective ways to link intimate partner violence-exposed children with a medical home and a primary pediatric provider and to improve relationships between pediatric providers and caregivers who face violence at home.
PubMed ID
18310168 View in PubMed
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E-communication among mothers of infants and toddlers in a community-based cohort: a content analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154163
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Jan;65(1):175-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Wendy Hall
Valerie Irvine
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. wendy.hall@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Jan;65(1):175-83
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Computers
Canada
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Communication
Data Collection
Electronic Mail - utilization
Family - psychology
Fathers
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Infant
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Parenting - psychology
Self-Help Groups - utilization
Social Support
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study to explain how mothers used a community based, cohort-based electronic communication system.
Early psychosocial support for families is regarded as inadequate. Employed women with young children can feel isolated from other families. Most parent e-mail lists are in a read-only format, with parents receiving informative e-mails from a corporation or a commercially motivated initiative. In an increasingly virtual age, it is important to examine parents' use of online support groups initiated by parents.
We used a qualitative descriptive design to conduct an inductive content analysis of archived threads of e-mail from 40 middle class Canadian mothers involved in a grass-roots online support cohort that shared birth year and geographical community. Two hundred and ninety-two pages of single-spaced mother-based communication that occurred from June 2004 to May 2005 were analysed.
Mothers used cohort-based electronic communication to build a local community, request and provide emotional support, share information and facilitate learning, and provide validation for the 'normalcy' of other women's mothering experiences. They shared stories and feelings, expressed sympathy, offered accolades, expressed appreciation for shared experiences, conveyed gratitude for support, and shared beliefs and expectations. Mothers anticipated childrearing difficulties shared strategies, exchanged advice, confirmed others' strategies and shared information.
Women in particular geographical areas can use asynchronous mail systems to share information with and obtain support from other mothers. Cohort-based electronic communication could be particularly important in rural areas where travel is restricted for women and access to professional support is limited.
PubMed ID
19016925 View in PubMed
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Evaluating family-centred service in paediatric oncology with the measure of processes of care (MPOC-20).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154354
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2009 Jan;35(1):16-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
A F Klassen
D. Dix
S J Cano
M. Papsdorf
L. Sung
R J Klaassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, 3A, 1200 Main Street W., Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada. aklass@mcmaster.ca
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2009 Jan;35(1):16-22
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Cancer Care Facilities - standards
Child
Child Health Services - standards
Child, Preschool
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms - nursing - therapy
Parents - psychology
Patient-Centered Care - standards
Process Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychometrics
Quality of Health Care - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In order to evaluate the family-centeredness of paediatric oncology services, a psychometrically sound measure of family-centred services is needed. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of the psychometric properties of the 20-item Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC-20) in parents of children undergoing treatment for cancer at five paediatric oncology centres in Canada.
The sample included 411 parents (80% response rate). Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the best way to group the items into scales. Psychometric tests were used to examine data quality, targeting, internal consistency reliability, within-scale construct validity and known-groups validity.
Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors: a summary measure of family-centred services and a scale measuring activities that meet parents' general informational needs. Scores spanned the entire scale range, floor and ceiling effects were low, and the sample distribution was not unduly skewed. Scales showed acceptable internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alphas > or =0.93). Known-group hypotheses supported the scales' ability to differentiate between groups hypothesized to differ. Moderate effect sizes were found when MPOC-20 scale scores for parents and for children with good quality of life were compared with those with poor quality of life.
The MPOC-20 is the only evaluated instrument currently available to measure family-centred services in paediatric oncology. Paediatric cancer programmes can now use this tool to determine parental perception of the extent to which services are family-centred.
PubMed ID
18991976 View in PubMed
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Pediatric neurology services in Canada: demand versus supply.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185518
Source
J Child Neurol. 2003 Mar;18(3):180-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Gabriel M Ronen
Brandon F Meaney
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. roneng@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Child Neurol. 2003 Mar;18(3):180-4
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Child, Preschool
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital - trends
Neurology - manpower - trends
Pediatrics - manpower - trends
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
As the practice of pediatric neurology has continued to evolve and expand, concerns have emerged regarding a perceived trend toward increasing clinical demand and decreasing manpower. Quantitative data are lacking, however. To address this, a questionnaire was sent to hospital-based pediatric neurology units in Canada, with all 18 centers responding. A total of 63 full-time-equivalent pediatric neurologists were disproportionately spread across the country, giving an overall ratio of 2.1 per million population (or 1.1 per 100,000 children). Waiting times for nonurgent consultations showed a median of 12.5 weeks. The number of weekly clinics per population was not proportional to either the number of specialists per center or to the waiting times. The regional variations in the level of service do not correlate with the regional manpower figures, reflecting different individual profiles of clinical and academic activities.
PubMed ID
12731643 View in PubMed
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Exploring childhood immunization uptake with First Nations mothers in north-western Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187080
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2003 Jan;41(1):63-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Marie Tarrant
David Gregory
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Studies, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. tarrantm@hkucc.hku.hk
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2003 Jan;41(1):63-72
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Fear
Female
Humans
Immunization - psychology - utilization
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Mothers - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Professional-Patient Relations
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Childhood immunization is an important component of preventive health care for young children. Successful control of vaccine-preventable diseases depends on high levels of immunization coverage. Immunization statistics show that on-reserve First Nations (Native Indian) children have lower vaccination coverage than children in the general Canadian population. There has been little research, however, conducted with First Nations populations on this topic.
This study explored First Nations parents' beliefs about childhood immunizations and examined factors influencing immunization uptake.
This study used a qualitative descriptive design to explore the issue of childhood immunization uptake. Twenty-eight mothers from two First Nations communities in north-western Ontario, Canada, were interviewed about their perceptions of childhood immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases. The interviews were transcribed and content analysis was used to examine the data.
Data analysis revealed the following six themes: (1) the fear of disease; (2) the efficacy of immunizations; (3) the immunization experience; (4) the consequences of immunization; (5) interactions with health professionals; and (6) barriers to immunizations. Participants were motivated to seek immunizations for their children by a fear of vaccine preventable diseases. A small proportion of mothers, however, questioned the effectiveness of vaccines in preventing disease. Traumatic immunization experiences, vaccine side-effects and sequelae, negative interactions with health professionals, and barriers such as time constraints and childhood illnesses all served as deterrents to immunization.
The research outcomes highlight the varied beliefs of First Nations parents about childhood immunizations and the numerous factors that both positively and negatively influence immunization uptake. Further research is needed to explore the issue of childhood immunizations in First Nations communities and to determine strategies to improve uptake.
PubMed ID
12519289 View in PubMed
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Access to specialized health care for asthmatic children in Norway: the significance of parents' educational background and social network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82112
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Sep;63(5):1316-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Finnvold Jon Erik
Author Affiliation
Statistics Norway, Oslo. jef@ssb.no
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Sep;63(5):1316-27
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - therapy
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Educational Status
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Hospitals, Public
Humans
Male
Norway
Parents
Severity of Illness Index
Social Support
Abstract
What determines access to the Voksentoppen Children's Asthma and Allergy Centre, the most specialized health care facility for asthmatic children in Norway? This publicly funded national institution is mandated to serve all segments of the population equally. The paper reports from the experiences of families with children having a confirmed diagnosis of moderate to severe asthma. The study population was selected from a national register of state cash-benefit recipients. Within this register, all families with a child under the age of 9 and with the diagnosis of asthma at the end of 1997 were selected (N = 2564). Further information about the population was gathered in a postal survey. It was found that access to the facility, measured as at least one admission during the period of the disease, was primarily determined by variations in morbidity. In particular, measures of health condition that presupposed a professional's evaluation of the child's health condition were significant. In addition, access was influenced by several factors not directly related to the need for treatment. Notably, children from families in which parents had a graduate education were over-represented among those with access to the top level of the institution's medical hierarchy. Multivariate analysis was used to search for causal mechanisms. It was found that families with a doctor in their social network had greater likelihood of access, and this in part accounted for the observed association between education and access. The pattern of access was also influenced by geographical factors, but not in a way that reduced the significance of educational background. Membership of, and participation in, patient organizations also increased the families' chances of receiving top-level professional treatment. The results depart from professional norms and officially stated health policy in Norway, which assert that health condition is the only valid criterion for allocating scarce medical goods.
PubMed ID
16725246 View in PubMed
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Dental caries, contact with dental services and deprivation in young children: their relationship at a small area level.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196598
Source
Br Dent J. 2000 Oct 14;189(7):376-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-2000
Author
M. Tickle
G. Moulding
K. Milsom
A. Blinkhorn
Author Affiliation
Manchester and Salford and Trafford Health Authorities, Turner Dental School, University of Manchester. Martin.Tickle@mchester-ha.nwest.nhs.uk
Source
Br Dent J. 2000 Oct 14;189(7):376-9
Date
Oct-14-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Care for Children - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Services - utilization
England - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Poverty
Social Class
Abstract
To measure the relationship between tooth decay, contact with dental services and deprivation at electoral ward level.
The study was carried out in 1998 in Ellesmere Port in the North West of England.
All children younger than six years resident in Ellesmere Port registered with GDS services and those using CDS services were matched against the HA population register to identify unregistered children. Rates for children aged 3-5 years 'in contact' with primary dental care services, whether CDS or GDS, were calculated at ward level. One calibrated examiner examined all 5-year-old children in Ellesmere Port and dmft scores were calculated at ward level. Ward deprivation was measured using the Jarman score. Bivariate linear regressions at ward level were performed in turn between: dmft and Jarman score; rates for 3-5-year-olds in contact with dental services and Jarman score; and dmft and rates for 3-5-year-olds in contact with dental services.
A significant linear relationship was observed between dmft and Jarman score (P=0.02, R2 = 0.43). Significant inverse relationships were found between rates for 3-5-year-olds in contact with dental services and Jarman score (P=0.001, R2 = 0.67), and also between dmft and rates for 3-5-year-olds in contact with dental services (P=0.002, R2 = 0.65).
A strong inverse relationship was found between dental caries and contact with primary dental care services at electoral ward level. This relationship needs to be explored over a wider geographical area to establish if it is consistent and independent of deprivation.
PubMed ID
11081948 View in PubMed
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105 records – page 1 of 11.