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Adolescent body composition and associations with body size and growth from birth to late adolescence. The Tromsø study: Fit Futures-A Norwegian longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300460
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2019 05; 14(5):e12492
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2019
Author
Elin Evensen
Nina Emaus
Anne-Sofie Furberg
Ane Kokkvoll
Jonathan Wells
Tom Wilsgaard
Anne Winther
Guri Skeie
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Research, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2019 05; 14(5):e12492
Date
05-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Composition
Body mass index
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Pediatric Obesity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Fat and fat-free masses and fat distribution are related to cardiometabolic risk.
to explore how birth weight, childhood body mass index (BMI) and BMI gain were related to adolescent body composition and central obesity.
In a population-based longitudinal study, body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 907 Norwegian adolescents (48% girls). Associations between birth weight, BMI categories, and BMI gain were evaluated by fitting linear mixed models and conditional growth models with fat mass index (FMI, kg/m2 ), fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg/m2 ) standard deviation scores (SDS), and central obesity at 15 to 20 years, as well as change in FMI SDS and FFMI SDS between ages 15 to 17 and 18 to 20 as outcomes.
Birth weight was associated with FFMI in adolescence. Greater BMI gain in childhood, conditioned on prior body size, was associated with higher FMI, FFMI, and central overweight/obesity with the strongest associations seen at age 6 to 16.5 years: FMI SDS: ß = 0.67, 95% CI (0.63-0.71), FFMI SDS: 0.46 (0.39, 0.52), in girls, FMI SDS: 0.80 (0.75, 0.86), FFMI SDS: 0.49 (0.43, 0.55), in boys.
Compared with birth and early childhood, high BMI and greater BMI gain at later ages are strong predictors of higher fat mass and central overweight/obesity at 15 to 20 years of age.
PubMed ID
30590874 View in PubMed
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Adult height in patients with childhood-onset inflammatory bowel disease: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306686
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 04; 51(8):789-800
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2020
Author
Natalia Mouratidou
Petter Malmborg
Michael C Sachs
Johan Askling
Anders Ekbom
Martin Neovius
Karin E Smedby
Lars Sävendahl
Jonas F Ludvigsson
Ola Olén
Author Affiliation
Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 04; 51(8):789-800
Date
04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Body Height
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology
Female
Growth Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Male
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Growth retardation is well described in childhood-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
To study if childhood-onset IBD is associated with reduced final adult height.
We identified 4201 individuals diagnosed with childhood-onset IBD 1990-2014 (Crohn's disease: n = 1640; ulcerative colitis: n = 2201 and IBD-unclassified = 360) in the Swedish National Patient Register.
Patients with IBD attained a lower adult height compared to reference individuals (adjusted mean height difference [AMHD] -0.9 cm [95% CI -1.1 to -0.7]) and to their healthy siblings (AMHD -0.8 cm [-1.0 to -0.6]). Patients with Crohn's disease (CD) were slightly shorter than patients with ulcerative colitis (UC; -1.3 cm vs -0.6 cm). Lower adult height was more often seen in patients with pre-pubertal disease onset (AMHD -1.6 cm [-2.0 to -1.2]), and in patients with a more severe disease course (AMHD -1.9 cm, [-2.4 to -1.4]). Some 5.0% of CD and 4.3% of UC patients were classified as growth retarded vs 2.5% of matched reference individuals (OR 2.42 [95% CI 1.85-3.17] and 1.74 [1.36-2.22] respectively).
Patients with childhood-onset IBD on average attain a slightly lower adult height than their healthy peers. Adult height was more reduced in patients with pre-pubertal onset of disease and in those with a more severe disease course.
Notes
CommentIn: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 Aug;52(3):563-564 PMID 32656831
CommentIn: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 Aug;52(3):560-561 PMID 32656832
CommentIn: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 Aug;52(3):559-560 PMID 32656841
PubMed ID
32133656 View in PubMed
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Adverse environments: investigating local variation in child growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162415
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Sep-Oct;19(5):676-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tina Moffat
Tracey Galloway
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L9. moffatcs@mcmaster.ca
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2007 Sep-Oct;19(5):676-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weights and Measures
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Female
Humans
Male
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Epigenetic and life history approaches to child growth are centered on the relationship between the organism and its environment. However, defining and operationalizing the concept of environment is challenging, in light of the multiple variables that influence growth. Moreover, the concept of adaptation as it applies to child growth is seldom considered in the developed country context. This paper presents a study of children living in three neighborhoods in the City of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Two of the communities are considered adverse environments on the basis of low socioeconomic status, and their inner city, industrial location. In contrast to children living in the higher socioeconomic status area, children in these adverse environments display negative growth indicators, i.e., somewhat constrained linear growth in one and risk for overweight and obesity in both. Although both these inner city neighborhoods constitute adverse environments, they differ in ways that have a significant impact on children's growth. We argue for a definition of "adverse environment" that is broadly based, incorporating a range of physical, social, and temporal factors that are highly localized and sensitive to community-level influences on growth and health. As well, we consider whether higher prevalence of overweight and obesity is adaptive in any way to these adverse environments and conclude that they are more likely to be deleterious than adaptive in either the long or short term.
PubMed ID
17636529 View in PubMed
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[Age- and sex-related differences in brainstem auditory evoked potentials in secondary school students living in Northern European Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146160
Source
Fiziol Cheloveka. 2009 Nov-Dec;35(6):56-67
Publication Type
Article

Age dynamics of evoked brain potentials in involuntary and voluntary attention to a deviant stimulus in schoolchildren from the northern region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98835
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2009 Nov;39(9):851-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
V P Rozhkov
E G Sergeeva
S I Soroko
Author Affiliation
Interinstitute Laboratory for Comparative Ecological-Physiological Studies, I. M. Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry, Russian Academy of Science, St. Petersburg, Russia. vlrozhkov@mail.ru
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2009 Nov;39(9):851-63
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Aging - physiology
Attention - physiology
Child
Child Development - physiology
Cold Climate
Electroencephalography - methods
Event-Related Potentials, P300 - physiology
Evoked Potentials, Auditory - physiology
Female
Humans
Learning - physiology
Male
Russia
Abstract
The central mechanisms of involuntary and voluntary regulation of attention in schoolchildren from the northern region were studied using a method based on the P300 wave of evoked brain potentials (the oddball paradigm). Data were compared with results obtained from psychological tests. Differences in the organization of EP were seen in the "passive" and active (counting) perception of deviant stimuli. Three components were identified within the time envelop of the P300 wave, two of which dominated in the frontal and one in the parietal area of the cerebral cortex. The latency of the P300 wave decreased with age in the children, reflecting increased rates of information processing and increases in the volume of operative memory. In passive perception, the statistical relationship characterized by a reduction in P300 latency with age was significant for leads in the central, temporal, parietal, and occipital areas; in active perception, this applied to all areas including the frontal. The most significant changes in P300 parameters were seen in children aged from seven to 12 years, indicating that this period can be regarded as "critical" in the development of learning skills. The roles of the parietal and frontal areas of the cortex in the mechanisms of involuntary and voluntary regulation of attention are discussed, along with the possibility of using the P300 method to identify children with delayed rates of development of voluntary attention in population studies.
PubMed ID
19830570 View in PubMed
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[Age-related changes in the physical development of Kabardin-Balkarian school-children living at various heights above sea level].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163334
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Mar-Apr;(2):50-1
Publication Type
Article
Author
S I Izaak
T V Panasiuk
A M Indreeva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Mar-Apr;(2):50-1
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Anthropometry
Child
Child Development - physiology
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Male
Oceans and Seas
Russia
Abstract
Four and eighty-one schoolchildren aged 7-17 years, living at a height of 2100 m above sea level, and 1677 schoolchildren of the same age, living at a height of 100-400 m above sea level, from the Kabardin-Balkarian Republic were examined by the list of morphological indices of physical development (PD), such as height (cm), body weight (kg), and chest circumference (cm). The results were rated by using the 5-score scale, by calculating the integral indicator of PD (low, moderate, and high). The schoolchildren living at high heights were ascertained to have high values. In the schoolchildren living at low heights, PD is of more harmony; the altitude children have the developed chest along with the smaller height and lower body weight. The geographical differences in three parameters of PH between Kabardin-Balkarian schoolchildren were heterodirectional: the altitude children outrun the plain one in height during a short period of time (the boys outrun at the age of 10 to 13 years; the girls do at the age of 11 to 14 years). In terms of body weight, the children from the study groups either outrun, or lag each other, in the boys and girls, these variations being opposite in time. From the age of 10 years, the altitude children of both sexes surpass the plain ones in chest circumference.
PubMed ID
17526230 View in PubMed
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[Age-Related Features of EEG Coherence in Children and Adolescents Living in the European North of Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268694
Source
Fiziol Cheloveka. 2015 Sep-Oct;41(5):74-89
Publication Type
Article
Author
S I Soroko
Zh V Nagornova
V P Rozhkov
N V Shemyakina
Source
Fiziol Cheloveka. 2015 Sep-Oct;41(5):74-89
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Aging - physiology
Cerebral Cortex - physiology
Child
Child Development - physiology
Electroencephalography
Female
Humans
Male
Russia
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Abstract
The paper presents data on the formation of spatial synchronization of brain potentials in 91 children aged 7-18 years living in European North of Russia. We estimated coherence values for 19 derivations (pair 171) in five EEG frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha-1, alpha-2 and beta). We described age-related changes, gender differences and topical specific features of the formation of coherence in the left and right hemispheres, and in inter- and intrahemispheric synchronization. We carried out computer assessment of the differences in EEG coherence between three age groups of children in order to determine criteria for identification of children with retarded formation of spatial organization of local EEG processes. Age-related changes in the structure of EEG patterns observed in the study reflect the processes of morphofunctional brain development in children and adolescents at different stages of postnatal ontogenesis under severe conditions of northern climate.
PubMed ID
26601411 View in PubMed
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[Age variability of anthropometric parameters of schoolchildren in the city of Nal'chik].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142483
Source
Morfologiia. 2010;137(1):44-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
M Kh Tlakadugova
M N Iakushenko
A Kh Urusbambetov
Source
Morfologiia. 2010;137(1):44-8
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Age Factors
Child
Child Development - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Puberty - physiology
Russia
Sex Characteristics
Urban Population
Abstract
Using unified Bunak's method, age- and gender-related growth dynamics of anthropometric parameters was evaluated in 2428 schoolchildren aged 7-18 years living in the city of Nal'chik. The first curve decussation of the absolute values studied, indicative of the beginning of puberty in girls occured at the age of 9.5 to 11.5 years; the second, which is typical for the puberty in boys, took place at the age of 11.5 to 14.5. After the second curve decussation (after 15 years), all the investigated parameters in boys, with the exception of pelvic width, were significantly higher as compared to those in girls; maximal differences were detected at the age of 18. The girls pass ahead of the boys in their development by 2-3 years. Quetelet II index values were found to be normal both in boys and girls at 18 years, indicating the moderate degree of development of subcutaneous adipose tissue.
PubMed ID
20593587 View in PubMed
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Altitude effects on growth of indigenous children in Oaxaca, Southern Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108354
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2013 Sep;152(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Bertis B Little
Robert M Malina
Maria Eugenia Pena Reyes
Guillermo Bali Chavez
Author Affiliation
Departments of Mathematics, Physics, and Engineering, and Division of Academic Affairs, Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX.
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2013 Sep;152(1):1-10
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Altitude
Analysis of Variance
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Child Development - physiology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mexico - epidemiology
Nutritional Status - physiology
Pediatric Obesity - physiopathology
Abstract
The effect of altitude of residence on the growth status of 11,454 indigenous school children 6-14 years of age in Oaxaca, southern Mexico, was examined. Indicators of living conditions (human development index [HDI], index of community nutritional risk [INR], index of marginalization [IM], index of relative isolation [II]) were regressed on z-scores for height, weight and BMI, and the residuals were regressed on altitude of residence (km). Independent of other environmental conditions, altitude negatively affected height by approximately -0.07 z-scores per kilometer altitude above sea level. The estimated average decrease in stature was 0.92 cm per kilometer elevation. BMI was significantly increased, 1.2 units per kilometer elevation, consistent with earlier studies of growth status and altitude. In contrast, weight was not affected by altitude of residence. Approximately 36% of the reduction in height and 54% of the increase in BMI were due to altitude effects; the remaining changes in height and BMI were associated with environmental factors reflected in the indices of community well-being considered.
PubMed ID
23900786 View in PubMed
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An introduction to latent growth models: analysis of repeated measures physical performance data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173149
Source
Res Q Exerc Sport. 2005 Jun;76(2):176-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Ilhyeok Park
Robert W Schutz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. ilhyeok.park@uregina.ca
Source
Res Q Exerc Sport. 2005 Jun;76(2):176-92
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child Development - physiology
Exercise
Humans
Models, Statistical
Physical Fitness - physiology
Research - statistics & numerical data
Sports
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Latent Growth Model (LGM) to researchers in exercise and sport science. Although the LGM has several merits over traditional analysis techniques in analyzing change and was first introduced almost 20 years ago, it is still underused in exercise and sport science research. This statistical model can be applied to any repeated measures data, but it is most useful when one has an a priori hypothesis about the patterns of change. The strengths of latent growth modeling include: (a) both individual and group levels of change are estimated, (b) either a linear or a curvilinear trajectory can represent individual change, (c) occasions of measurement need not be equally spaced, (d) the statistical model can account for measurement errors, (e) the model can easily include multiple predictors or correlates of change, and (f) as in general structural equation models, statistical models are flexible and allow one to extend the basic idea in several ways, such as comparing changes between groups and examining the change in multivariate latentfactors. In this paper, the basics and an extension of latent growth modeling are explained, and examples with longitudinal physical performance data are presented, along with detailed analysis procedures and considerations.
PubMed ID
16128485 View in PubMed
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259 records – page 1 of 26.