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1260 records – page 1 of 126.

Source
Sykepleien. 1975 Sep 20;62(18):855-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1975
Author
J. Steen
Source
Sykepleien. 1975 Sep 20;62(18):855-8
Date
Sep-20-1975
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Development
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Norway
PubMed ID
1043259 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 14-year follow-up of children with normal and abnormal birth weight for their gestational age. A population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239462
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1985
Author
P. Rantakallio
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 Jan;74(1):62-9
Date
Jan-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Child Development
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology
Male
Mortality
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Mortality, major neurological handicaps--including mental retardation, cerebral palsy and epilepsy--educational subnormality and height at 14 years of age were studied by birth weight percentiles in a birth cohort of 12 000 children from northern Finland. Infant mortality was significantly higher below the mean -2 SD, 10th and 25th percentiles, than in the median class, from 25th to 75th percentiles, but mortality from one to 14 years only in the lowest weight class. Educational subnormality, including mental retardation +/- some other handicap, was highly significantly more frequent in all the percentile classes lower than the median class but showed no significant tendency to be less frequent in the percentiles over the median. It was also highly significantly more frequent among the preterm than the term infant. The number of children with a major neurological handicap but normal school performance did not vary significantly by birth weight percentiles or by gestational age. Height at 14 years increased significantly by birth weight percentiles. The height of the boys with birth weight mean - and +2 SD was nevertheless within the 25th-75th percentiles for height at 14 years in general, while the height of the girls came close to these percentile limits. The preterm infants were significantly shorter than the term infants at 14 years.
PubMed ID
3984729 View in PubMed
Less detail

[31 women with drug problems got children--what happened after that?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9974
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2001
Author
A. Sundfaer
Author Affiliation
Barne- og ungdomspsykiatrisk poliklinikk Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. bupull@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Date
Jan-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Child Behavior
Child Development
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - psychology
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The intention of this study was to increase the knowledge concerning the rehabilitation of women with drug problems after the birth of a child and to find out how the children developed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A follow-up study of 31 women, former drug and alcohol abusers and their children, 19 girls and 12 boys born in 1982-1983. The first survey took place when the children were 2-3 years of age, then when they were 7-9 and at last when they were 15-17. The biological mothers, foster or adoptive mothers, the children and their teachers were interviewed. RESULTS: The women got more support and control during the pregnancy than afterwards. Most of the mothers became single. Women with the shortest drug history, a good social network and a stable partner without drug problems kept the care of their children. By the first survey (1985), seven children had been placed in foster homes, in the second (1992) two further children had been taken away from their mothers, and in the third (1999) only one third of the children were living with their biological mothers. Most of the children did well at school and in their families, had friends and leisure activities despite still living by their mothers or in foster/adoption homes. None of the youngsters had been in conflict with the law or were drug abusers, but every second teenage girl needed psychological support. Children who had been stable by their drug-free biological mothers functioned best. INTERPRETATION: Mothers with drug problems do not get sufficient attention after the delivery and when the children grow up. A supporting family should be brought in contact with mother and child after the delivery. Under special circumstances pregnancy can be a positive turning point for women with drug problems.
PubMed ID
12013619 View in PubMed
Less detail

Achievement and mental ability of physically late and early maturing schoolchildren related to their social background.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40354
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1982 Oct;23(4):407-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1982
Author
G. Westin-Lindgren
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1982 Oct;23(4):407-20
Date
Oct-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Child
Child Development
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Male
Psychological Tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
The results from achievement and mental ability testing in grades 3, 5, and 6 (ages 10, 12 and 13) of about 150 Swedish urban schoolchildren (boys and girls) were analysed according to the children's physical maturity (defined by late and early peak height velocity ages) and social background (defined by father's occupation). Social background played the main role in performance on both the achievement and most of the mental ability tests. Early maturers were, in general, superior to late maturers on the mental ability tests in grade 5. On verbally loaded tests and interaction between physical maturity and social background was found--early maturers scored higher than late maturers in the "lowest" social group, while a slight trend or no difference between early and late maturers was noticed for the 'upper' social groups.
PubMed ID
7130299 View in PubMed
Less detail

The added value of the combined use of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule: diagnostic validity in a clinical Swedish sample of toddlers and young preschoolers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267308
Source
Autism. 2015 Feb;19(2):187-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Eric Zander
Harald Sturm
Sven Bölte
Source
Autism. 2015 Feb;19(2):187-99
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - diagnosis
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Interview, Psychological - methods - standards
Male
Psychometrics
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
The diagnostic validity of the new research algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the revised algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule was examined in a clinical sample of children aged 18-47 months. Validity was determined for each instrument separately and their combination against a clinical consensus diagnosis. A total of N = 268 children (n = 171 with autism spectrum disorder) were assessed. The new Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised algorithms (research cutoff) gave excellent specificities (91%-96%) but low sensitivities (44%-52%). Applying adjusted cutoffs (lower than recommended based on receiver operating characteristics) yielded a better balance between sensitivity (77%-82%) and specificity (60%-62%). Findings for the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule were consistent with previous studies showing high sensitivity (94%-100%) and alongside lower specificity (52%-76%) when using the autism spectrum cutoff, but better balanced sensitivity (81%-94%) and specificity (81%-83%) when using the autism cutoff. A combination of both the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (with adjusted cutoff) and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (autism spectrum cutoff) yielded balanced sensitivity (77%-80%) and specificity (87%-90%). Results favor a combined usage of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule in young children with unclear developmental problems, including suspicion of autism spectrum disorder. Evaluated separately, the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (cutoff for autism) provides a better diagnostic accuracy than the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised.
PubMed ID
24413849 View in PubMed
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ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, temperament, and character: phenotypical associations and etiology in a Swedish childhood twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112856
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;54(8):1140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Nóra Kerekes
Sven Brändström
Sebastian Lundström
Maria Råstam
Thomas Nilsson
Henrik Anckarsäter
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health (CELAM), University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Prison and Probation Services, R&D Unit, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: nora.kerekes@neuro.gu.se.
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;54(8):1140-7
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Character
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Personality - physiology
Phenotype
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperament - physiology
Twins, Dizygotic - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Twins, Monozygotic - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To explore the links between neurodevelopmental disorders - attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) - and personality in a population-based, genetically sensitive study of children.
A population-based sample of 1886 twins aged 9 and 12, enriched for childhood mental health problems, was recruited from the Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden (CATSS). Parents were interviewed over the telephone using the Autism-Tics, AD/HD and other Comorbidities (A-TAC) inventory, and in a second step they rated their children according to the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory (JTCI).
ADHD was strongly correlated with novelty seeking, while ASD was correlated positively with harm avoidance and negatively with reward dependence. The strongest associations between personality traits and neurodevelopmental disorders were negative correlations between the character dimensions of self-directedness and cooperativeness and ADHD and ASD alike. Cross-twin cross-trait correlations between ADHD, ASD, and personality dimensions in monozygotic twins were more than double those in dizygotic twins, indicating a strong genetic effect behind the phenotypic covariation between neurodevelopmental disorders and personality.
Neurodevelopmental disorders are linked specifically to particular temperament profiles and generally to hampered development of the self-governing strategies referred to as "character." Poor self-agency and cooperation may be core functional outcomes in the separation of children with handicapping conditions from those with traits only reminiscent of neurodevelopmental disorders. The associations between neurodevelopmental disorders and personality are at least partly due to genetic effects influencing both conditions. As a consequence, personality must be broadly considered in neuropsychiatry, just as neuropsychiatric disorders and their genetic, neurodevelopmental, and cognitive susceptibilities have to be in personality research and clinical treatment.
PubMed ID
23790516 View in PubMed
Less detail

ADHD in Swedish 3- to 7-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31986
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Sep;40(9):1021-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
C. Kadesjö
B. Kadesjö
B. Hägglöf
C. Gillberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Sep;40(9):1021-8
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - psychology
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Severity of Illness Index
Social Behavior
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study characteristics of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a representative group of clinically impaired young children in Sweden with the disorder. METHOD: One hundred thirty-one children with ADHD (aged 3-7 years) were examined, and their parents were interviewed. Independent parent questionnaire data (Child Behavior Checklist, ADHD Rating Scale-IV, Conners) were collected. For comparison 131 children without ADHD were matched for age, gender, parents' marital status, child's adoption status, and social class. RESULTS: Children with ADHD had extremely high ADHD symptom levels--on average four to eight times higher than the comparison group. Sociodemographic correlates of ADHD symptoms were more pronounced in parent questionnaire data than in parent interview data, underscoring the importance of diagnostic interview when dealing with clinical issues. Very few of the children with ADHD (6%) appeared "normal" with regard to attention/activity level at clinical examination. CONCLUSIONS: Clinic children with a diagnosis of DSM-IV ADHD have typical and impairing symptoms already before starting school. The variance of ADHD in this age group appears to be accounted for by primary psychosocial factors only to a limited degree. It would seem reasonable to establish supportive and treatment measures for these young children so that the psychosocial and academic problems shown by so many individuals with ADHD later in their development might be reduced.
PubMed ID
11556625 View in PubMed
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1260 records – page 1 of 126.