Skip header and navigation

Refine By

22 records – page 1 of 3.

Absenteeism because of illness at daycare centers and in three-family systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37191
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Apr;80(4):436-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
I L Dahl
M. Grufman
C. Hellberg
M. Krabbe
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, East Hospital, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Apr;80(4):436-45
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Child
Child Care - methods
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Family
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infection - epidemiology
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Absenteeism because of illness was recorded for 346 children and 98 staff members at eight daycare centers in Gothenburg during a nine-month period between October 1987 and June 1988. A comparison was made with a similar, nationwide study, carried out in 1977 by the Swedish Central Bureau of Statistics. This comparison demonstrated that the absence of children and employees from daycare centers for health reasons was of the same proportion in the present study as that reported a decade earlier. Absenteeism because of illness among the 346 children at the daycare centers was also compared with absenteeism among 49 children in 14 groups run according to the three-family system (three to six children/group). It was found that absenteeism was at least twice as frequent among children at daycare centers than among those in the three-family system.
PubMed ID
2058393 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advancing our understanding of mothers' safety rules for school-age children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128871
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Nov-Dec;102(6):455-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Barbara A Morrongiello
Alexa Kane
Melissa Bell
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1. bmorrong@uoguelph.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Nov-Dec;102(6):455-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident Prevention - methods
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child Care - methods - standards
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Observation
Ontario
Safety
Abstract
Teaching safety rules is a common way parents attempt to moderate injury risk for elementary-school children, but few studies have examined the nature of this teaching. The present study explored whether mothers' safety rules varied with type of injury (falls, poisoning, burns and cuts), the nature of these teaching strategies about rules, and how effective these rules were to moderate children's risk behaviour when in a setting having 'contrived' hazards that were targeted by these rules.
Mothers completed an interview about safety rules, and children's behaviour was unobtrusively observed in a 'contrived hazards' situation having hazards relevant to falls, poisoning, burns and cuts.
Mothers had significantly fewer rules addressing fall risks than other types of injuries, and fall-related rules were highly hazard-specific in nature, rather than aimed at teaching general principles for appraising fall risks. For all types of injuries except falls, children interacted with fewer hazards for which there were rules.
Rules can have preventive properties that can serve to moderate children's interacting with hazards when alone, but this seems to vary depending on the type of rule that has been taught. Given that falls are a leading cause of injury hospitalization for children and that parents are not emphasizing fall prevention as much as other types of injuries, efforts should be extended to promote parents' shifting their prevention approaches to better address this particular injury risk.
PubMed ID
22164558 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caregiving arrangement and nutrition: good news with some reservations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197779
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Jan-Feb;90(1):45-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
R A Goodwin
A C Buchholz
M K McKim
B. Stuart
D L O'Connor
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Studies, University of Guelph, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Jan-Feb;90(1):45-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Child Day Care Centers
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Female
Ferritins - blood
Folic Acid - blood
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Ontario
Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective of this study was to assess the impact of caregiving arrangement on the iron and folate status of infants and toddlers reared at home or enrolled in centre-based, independent home, or licensed home care. One hundred and eighty-nine children aged 2 to 29 months were assessed 1 month prior to child care entry and at 6 months after entry into child care. Dietary (24-hour records), anthropometric (height, weight, head circumference) and biochemical (red blood cell folate, hematocrit, transferrin, and serum ferritin concentrations) methods were used to assess nutritional status. Frequency of illness was determined by a series of telephone interviews. Median intake of nutrients exceeded Canadian recommendations, regardless of care arrangement. Fifteen of 65 children had hematocrit values below age-specific cutoffs at the 6-month post-entry to child care visit. Children were frequently taken to obtain medical advice (average of 4 to 6 times during the study period) and 75% of subjects were prescribed at least one course of antibiotics. In conclusion, infants and toddlers in this study were generally well nourished, regardless of child care arrangement; however, iron status may remain an issue in this sample of infants and toddlers.
PubMed ID
10910566 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child care arrangement and preschool development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195801
Source
Can J Public Health. 2000 Nov-Dec;91(6):418-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. To
S M Cadarette
Y. Liu
Author Affiliation
Population Health Sciences, Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2000 Nov-Dec;91(6):418-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child Care - methods - organization & administration - standards
Child Day Care Centers - utilization
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Socialization
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Baseline data from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth were used to evaluate the associations between child care arrangement and poor developmental attainment (PDA). A weighted total of 521,800 children aged 2 to 3 years were studied (N = 2,709). PDA was assessed by age-standardized motor and social development score. Children were grouped by the predominant type of arrangement: care by someone in the child's own home, in another home (family child care), at a child care centre, or none (child care exclusive to parents). Controlling for socioeconomic status, biological factors and maternal immigration, family dysfunction, hostile parenting and low neighbourhood safety were correlated with PDA and positive parent-child interaction decreased the odds of PDA. Whereas centre child care arrangements were beneficial to development overall (OR = 0.41, 99% CI = 0.18, 0.93), an interaction existed between type of child care and maternal depression; among children with depressed mothers, centre child care was associated with increased odds of PDA. Findings suggest that the associations between child care arrangement and child development involve interactions of factors that influence a child's home environment. Future child development studies exploring these interactions are warranted.
PubMed ID
11200730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child care: implications for overweight / obesity in Canadian children?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117475
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Dec;33(1):1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
L. McLaren
M. Zarrabi
D J Dutton
M C Auld
J C H Emery
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. lmclaren@ucalgary.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Dec;33(1):1-11
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Over recent decades, two prominent trends have been observed in Canada and elsewhere: increasing prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity, and increasing participation of women (including mothers) in the paid labour force and resulting demand for child care options. While an association between child care and children's body mass index (BMI) is plausible and would have policy relevance, its existence and nature in Canada is not known.
Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, we examined exposure to three types of care at age 2/3 years (care by non-relative, care by relative, care in a daycare centre) in relation to change in BMI percentile (continuous and categorical) between age 2/3 years and age 6/7 years, adjusting for health and sociodemographic correlates.
Care by a non-relative was associated with an increase in BMI percentile between age 2/3 years and age 6/7 years for boys, and for girls from households of low income adequacy.
Considering the potential benefits of high-quality formal child care for an array of health and social outcomes and the potentially adverse effects of certain informal care options demonstrated in this study and others, our findings support calls for ongoing research on the implications of diverse child care experiences for an array of outcomes including those related to weight.
PubMed ID
23294916 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child care is not a substantial risk factor for gastrointestinal infection hospitalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91013
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Dec;122(6):e1168-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Kamper-Jørgensen Mads
Andersen Lise Geisler
Simonsen Jacob
Sørup Signe
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Department of Epidemiology Research, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark. mka@ssi.dk
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Dec;122(6):e1168-73
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Child Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Child Day Care Centers - utilization
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Odds Ratio
Poisson Distribution
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study the effect of age at first enrollment into child care and other child care-related factors on the risk for hospitalization from gastrointestinal infection. METHODS: This was a population-based prospective cohort study of 1,110,973 Danish children aged 0 to 5 years in the period 1989-2004. By means of Poisson regression, risk for gastrointestinal infection hospitalization was evaluated by incidence rate ratio and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Overall, children who were attending child care had an IRR of gastrointestinal infection hospitalization of 1.02 compared with children in home care. When compared within the group of children who attended child care, those who were enrolled after 18 months of age had a slightly increased risk compared with those who were enrolled before 1 year of age. The first 5 months of enrollment were associated with an IRR of 1.18 compared with later periods, and similar risks were observed in different types of child care facilities. The effect of child care was similar in most strata of the studied child, family, and demographic variables; however, children younger than 1 year who attended child care had an IRR of 1.44 compared with children of the same age in home care. Well established risk factors for gastrointestinal infection such as young age and male gender were reproduced; compared with 5-year-olds, children younger than 1 year had an IRR of 7.37 and boys had an IRR of 1.18 compared with girls. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that child care attendance is not a substantial risk factor for gastrointestinal infection hospitalization in most Danish children. Late enrollment and the first short period of enrollment were associated with a slightly increased risk for gastrointestinal infection hospitalization.
PubMed ID
19047219 View in PubMed
Less detail

Closing the gap in academic readiness and achievement: the role of early childcare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140369
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;51(12):1359-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Marie-Claude Geoffroy
Sylvana M Côté
Charles-Édouard Giguère
Ginette Dionne
Philip David Zelazo
Richard E Tremblay
Michel Boivin
Jean R Séguin
Author Affiliation
Centre for Paediatric Epidemiology & Biostatistics/MRC Centre for Epidemiology of Child Health, Institute of Child Health, University College London, UK.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;51(12):1359-67
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Age Factors
Child
Child Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Cognition
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mathematics
Mothers - education
Quebec
Reading
Registries
Vocabulary
Abstract
Socially disadvantaged children with academic difficulties at school entry are at increased risk for poor health and psychosocial outcomes. Our objective is to test the possibility that participation in childcare--at the population level--could attenuate the gap in academic readiness and achievement between children with and without a social disadvantage (indexed by low levels of maternal education).
A cohort of infants born in the Canadian province of Quebec in 1997/1998 was selected through birth registries and followed annually until 7 years of age (n = 1,863). Children receiving formal childcare (i.e., center-based or non-relative out-of-home) were distinguished from those receiving informal childcare (i.e., relative or nanny). Measures from 4 standardized tests that assessed cognitive school readiness (Lollipop Test for School Readiness), receptive vocabulary (Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test Revised), mathematics (Number Knowledge Test), and reading performance (Kaufman Assessment Battery for children) were administered at 6 and 7 years.
Children of mothers with low levels of education showed a consistent pattern of lower scores on academic readiness and achievement tests at 6 and 7 years than those of highly educated mothers, unless they received formal childcare. Specifically, among children of mothers with low levels of education, those who received formal childcare obtained higher school readiness (d = 0.87), receptive vocabulary (d = 0.36), reading(d = 0.48) and math achievement scores (d = 0.38; although not significant at 5%) in comparison with those who were cared for by their parents. Childcare participation was not associated with cognitive outcomes among children of mothers with higher levels of education.
Public investments in early childcare are increasing in many countries with the intention of reducing cognitive inequalities between disadvantaged and advantaged children. Our findings provide further evidence suggesting that formal childcare could represent a preventative means of attenuating effects of disadvantage on children's early academic trajectory.
Notes
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Jul;161(7):669-7617606830
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Nov;64(11):1305-1217984399
Cites: Child Dev. 2007 Mar-Apr;78(2):681-70117381797
Cites: Eval Rev. 2006 Oct;30(5):611-3016966678
Cites: Am Psychol. 2006 Feb-Mar;61(2):99-11616478355
Cites: Dev Psychol. 1998 Sep;34(5):1129-449779757
Cites: Child Dev. 1995 Apr;66(2):474-857750378
Cites: Child Dev. 1994 Apr;65(2 Spec No):457-718013234
Cites: Child Dev. 2004 Jan-Feb;75(1):47-6515015674
Cites: Child Dev. 2003 Sep-Oct;74(5):1368-7814552403
Cites: Pediatrics. 2003 Jun;111(6 Pt 1):1351-712777552
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2003 Apr;24(3 Suppl):32-4612668197
Cites: Child Dev. 2010 May-Jun;81(3):737-5620573102
Cites: Child Dev. 2009 Sep-Oct;80(5):1329-4919765003
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2007 Nov;43(6):1428-4618020822
Cites: Pediatrics. 2008 Apr;121(4):e1008-1518381499
Cites: Science. 2008 Aug 29;321(5893):1161-218755959
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 2007 Jun;16(3):243-5817621470
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2008 Nov-Dec;99(6):451-519149384
Cites: Child Dev. 2007 Nov-Dec;78(6):1855-6917988326
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2007 May;48(5):490-717501730
PubMed ID
20883519 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Conference of the representatives of European Socialist countries regarding health care, development and upbringing of children in the first 3 years of life (Kiev September 27-30, 1977)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41358
Source
Pediatr Pol. 1979 Jun;54(6):677-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Jun-1979

Epidemiology of acute otitis media in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40240
Source
Scand J Infect Dis Suppl. 1983;39:19-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
K. Lundgren
L. Ingvarsson
Source
Scand J Infect Dis Suppl. 1983;39:19-25
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Age Factors
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology
Child
Child Care - methods
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Housing
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Sweden
Abstract
A prospective, longitudinal, epidemiological study of acute otitis media (AOM) in children started in Malmö in 1977 and is planned to continue for about 10 years. All cases of AOM in children are registered. The registration includes the name of the patient, the individual ten-digit birth-number and date and place of diagnosis. The registered information is supplemented with information on the patients' dwelling and type of day-care within the city at the time of diagnosis. All data are computerized. In 1977, all children up to 3 years of age were registered. In each of the following two years, a new age class was included. Since 1980 children up to 15 years have been registered. The results regarding the occurrence of AOM in 1980 show that about 10% of all children under 16 years of age had at least one episode of AOM. The disease was most common among one-year-olds, and about 30% of this age class had at least one episode. The occurrence did not vary with sex. AOM was most common during the winter season. The results of the cohort study of children born in 1977, with an observation time of maximum 48 months, show that children aged 6-11 months run the greatest risk of getting AOM. Fifty-four % of the children had at least one episode before the age of 48 months, and 48% of these children had more than one episode. There was no difference between the sexes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
6580731 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Experience with the teaching of the course on "The status and dynamics of children's health"]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37948
Source
Gig Sanit. 1989 Dec;(12):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989

22 records – page 1 of 3.