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97 records – page 1 of 10.

ADDH and conduct disorder: degree of diagnostic overlap and differences among correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229983
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1989 Nov;28(6):865-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
P. Szatmari
M. Boyle
D R Offord
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1989 Nov;28(6):865-72
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Developmental Disabilities - complications
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Psychosocial Deprivation
Abstract
The objective of this paper was to determine the degree of diagnostic overlap between attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADDH) and conduct disorder (CD) and to see whether ADDH children show a different pattern of demographic, familial, and developmental correlates compared to CD children. The sample for this study consisted of 2,697 4- to 16-year-olds who participated in the Ontario Child Health Study. In terms of diagnostic overlap, ADDH and CD occurred together more often than by chance alone, particularly among girls. Pure groups of ADDH and CD children differed in a variety of ways. In general, ADDH children were younger and had experienced more developmental delays and less psychosocial disadvantage than the CD children. No differences were found with respect to associated impairments, a measure of severity. Children with both ADDH and CD (a mixed group) appeared to represent a true hybrid disorder rather than one diagnosis or the other. These findings support the validity of ADDH compared to CD, at least in terms of the pattern of correlates.
PubMed ID
2478519 View in PubMed
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Adolescents born extremely preterm: behavioral outcomes and quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138950
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2011 Jun;52(3):251-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Anne-Li Hallin
Karin Stjernqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. anne-li.hallin@psychology.se
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2011 Jun;52(3):251-6
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aggression - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Aspirations (Psychology)
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Intelligence
Internal-External Control
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Quality of Life - psychology
Risk-Taking
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Fifty-two extremely premature born and 54 full-term controls were assessed regarding behavioral outcomes, risk-taking and self-perceived quality of life. Behavioral outcomes were assessed with the Achenbach Youth Self Report; risk-taking was estimated regarding alcohol and nicotine use; self-perceived quality of life and future expectations were rated; and attention and hyperactivity problems were surveyed retrospectively with the Wender Utah Rating Scale. The prematurely born reported fewer problems than full-term born on the externalizing scale (delinquent behavior and aggressive behaviour); and they reported less alcohol consumption. No difference was observed between the two groups concerning nicotine use, views about quality of life and expectations for the future or in the retrospective assessment of attention and hyper-activity problems. Conclusively, the prematurely born adolescents described a quality of life and future expectations comparable to full-term born controls. They also reported fewer behavioral problems and less risk-taking behavior.
PubMed ID
21121924 View in PubMed
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Associations between disturbed sleep and behavioural difficulties in 635 children aged six to eight years: a study based on parents' perceptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32239
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Mar;10(1):1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
H. Smedje
J E Broman
J. Hetta
Author Affiliation
Child Psychiatric Clinic, Gävle County Hospital, SE-801 87 Gävle, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Mar;10(1):1-9
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Personality Assessment
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sleep Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Associations between sleep and behaviour in 635 children, aged six to eight years, were investigated using parental responses to a sleep habits questionnaire, and to a behavioural screening form, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Global reports of sleep problems in 4.9% of the children were associated with a total SDQ score indicative of behaviour problems in 36% of the cases. Conversely, 15% of children with behaviour problems had global reports of sleep problems. Associations between specific sleeping features and different dimensions of behaviour and emotions were also explored. Hyperactivity was associated with tossing and turning during sleep, and with sleep walking; conduct problems were related to bedtime resistance; and emotional symptoms were associated with night terrors, difficulty falling asleep and daytime somnolence. Peer problems were associated with somewhat shorter total sleep time. Finally, a total SDQ score indicative of behaviour problems was associated with bedwetting, nightmares, tossing and turning during sleep and sleep walking, as well as with a slightly shorter total sleep time. We conclude that sleep and behaviour problems are associated in children, and that characteristic associations exist between particular sleep disturbances and specific dimensions of behaviour.
PubMed ID
11315530 View in PubMed
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The Autism--Tics, AD/HD and other Comorbidities (A-TAC) telephone interview: convergence with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97863
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 May 4;64(3):218-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-4-2010
Author
Sara Lina Hansson Halleröd
Tomas Larson
Ola Ståhlberg
Eva Carlström
Carina Gillberg
Henrik Anckarsäter
Maria Råstam
Paul Lichtenstein
Christopher Gillberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sege Park 8A, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 May 4;64(3):218-24
Date
May-4-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diseases in Twins - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Sweden
Tic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare telephone interview screening for child psychiatric/neuropsychiatric disorders using the inventory of Autism-Tics, Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) and other Comorbidities (A-TAC) with results from the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). BACKGROUND: The A-TAC is a parent telephone interview focusing on autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and co-existing problems, developed for lay interviewers. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A-TAC telephone interviews and CBCL questionnaires were obtained from parents of 106 Swedish twin pairs aged 9 and 12 years. RESULTS: Correlations between A-TAC modules and CBCL scales aimed at measuring similar concepts were generally significant albeit modest, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.30 through 0.55. CONCLUSION: The A-TAC has convergent validity with the CBCL in several problem areas, but the A-TAC also provides more detailed and specific assessments of ASD symptoms and related neuropsychiatric problems.
Notes
RefSource: Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 May 4;64(3):146
PubMed ID
20192892 View in PubMed
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[Behavioral symptoms among children and adolescents. Screening with the help of a questionnaire in a group of children aged 4 to 17 years]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33761
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Jul 20;160(30):4423-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-1998
Author
N. Bilenberg
K. Hørder
Author Affiliation
Det børnepsykiatriske Hus, Odense Universitetshospital.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Jul 20;160(30):4423-8
Date
Jul-20-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Child
Child Behavior
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
A Danish translation of "The Child Behavior Checklist" (CBCL), developed by Achenbach and Edelbrock in Vermont, was standardized on 1,300 children aged between four and 17 years in the county of Fyn. The response rate was 61.4% and lowest among boys. Responders were compared to non-responders on different variables generated by the Danish Statistical Institute. No significant differences emerged across the two groups with respect to analysed confounders. We found a mean total CBCL score of 15-20 out of 232 possible points with considerable variation. The 95 percentile reflects a possible cut-off score for behavioural deviance or "psychiatric abnormality". This varied from 35 points in four to five years old girls to 58 points in six to ten years old boys. Parents reported hyperactivity and restlessness in 6.8% of six to ten year-old boys. Depression and sadness were reported in about 2% of all children six years or older. Six point three percent of all girls of 11-16 years selfreported obsessions. The 11-16 year-olds generally reported more symptomatic behaviour than their parents and teachers did about them.
PubMed ID
9691835 View in PubMed
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Behavioural and emotional symptoms in 8-9-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199643
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999;8 Suppl 4:7-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
F. Almqvist
K. Kumpulainen
K. Ikäheimo
S L Linna
I. Henttonen
E. Huikko
E. Tuompo-Johansson
E. Aronen
K. Puura
J. Piha
T. Tamminen
E. Räsänen
I. Moilanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Finland. fredrik.almqvist@huch.fi
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999;8 Suppl 4:7-16
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
We present epidemiological data from a multi-centre study on psychiatric symptoms among 6017 8-9-year-old children representing a total annual birth cohort (N = 60007) in Finland. The results are based on three questionnaires: the Rutter Parent Scale (RA2), the Rutter Teacher Scale (RB2), the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). The proportion of children that scored above the cutoff points, indicating probable psychiatric disturbance, were 11.2% for the RA2, 13.9% for the RB2 and 6.9% for the CDI. Twenty-four percent of the subjects scored above the cutoff point on at least one of the questionnaires. Low family social status and disrupted family relations correlated strongly with high rates of symptoms in the children.
PubMed ID
10654129 View in PubMed
Less detail

Behavioural/emotional symptoms among 8-9-year-old children with somatic symptoms or illnesses as reported by their teacher.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199638
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999;8 Suppl 4:55-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
E. Huikko
E. Tuompo-Johansson
A C Kairemo
J. Piha
I. Moilanen
E. Räsänen
T. Tamminen
F. Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Tuusula Child Guidance Clinic, Finland.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999;8 Suppl 4:55-61
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Teaching
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess children's behavioural/emotional symptoms at school and to compare these symptoms of somatically healthy children with those of children with somatic illnesses or symptoms. The Rutter Teacher Questionnaire (RB2) was used for measuring psychiatric symptoms in 5813 children aged 8-9 years. The parents reported the somatic symptoms and illnesses of their children during the previous 12 months. One hundred and sixty one children had a marked or serious chronic illness, 292 had a mild chronic illness, and 92 had one or several symptoms. The findings suggest that boys with a marked or serious chronic somatic illness are prone to manifest psychiatric symptoms in their interactions with peers and teachers at school and that boys with a mild chronic illness have less psychiatric symptoms than healthy boys.
PubMed ID
10654134 View in PubMed
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Behavioural problems in children who weigh 1000 g or less at birth in four countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194233
Source
Lancet. 2001 May 26;357(9269):1641-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-26-2001
Author
E T Hille
A L den Ouden
S. Saigal
D. Wolke
M. Lambert
A. Whitaker
J A Pinto-Martin
L. Hoult
R. Meyer
J F Feldman
S P Verloove-Vanhorick
N. Paneth
Author Affiliation
TNO Prevention and Health, Child Health Division, PO Box 2215, 2301 CE, Leiden, Netherlands. ET.Hille@pg.tno.nl
Source
Lancet. 2001 May 26;357(9269):1641-3
Date
May-26-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - psychology
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The increased survival chances of extremely low-birthweight (ELBW) infants (weighing
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2001 Sep 8;358(9284):84311570409
PubMed ID
11425366 View in PubMed
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Behaviour/emotional problems in male juvenile delinquents and controls in Russia: the role of personality traits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204394
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1998 Sep;98(3):231-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
V V Ruchkin
M. Eisemann
C R Cloninger
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and WHO Collaborating Centre, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1998 Sep;98(3):231-6
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Defense Mechanisms
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Recent studies based on the psychobiological theory of personality by Cloninger postulate a relationship between certain personality traits and various psychopathological manifestations. To test this theory, we administered the Temperament and Character Inventory and the Youth Self-Report to 188 male delinquents from a juvenile correction centre in Northern Russia, and to 111 age-matched male controls recruited from among schoolchildren. As assumed by previous studies, psychological symptoms were primarily positively correlated with harm avoidance and negatively correlated with self-directedness. At the same time, the higher levels of aggressive and delinquent behaviour were positively correlated with novelty-seeking and negatively correlated with co-operativeness. The possible mechanisms underlying these findings are discussed.
PubMed ID
9761412 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bilingualism, school achievement, and mental wellbeing: a follow-up study of return migrant children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32859
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;41(2):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
L. Vuorenkoski
O. Kuure
I. Moilanen
V. Penninkilampi
A. Myhrman
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;41(2):261-6
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Child Development - physiology
Culture
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Language
Mental health
Multilingualism
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
In the first phase of this follow-up study we investigated how the use of more than one language affects mental wellbeing and school achievement among 320 school-aged Finnish-Swedish re-migrant children. Now, in the second phase, we screened the same series of children 6 years after migration for psychiatric and psychosomatic symptoms. Out of five groups distinguished in terms of patterns of language use, two had fared well and three showed evident vulnerability. Both successful groups were marked by consistent use of the two languages, Finnish and Swedish, whereas the risk groups were characterised by mixed use of languages before re-migration or substantial language shift after re-migration.
PubMed ID
10750552 View in PubMed
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97 records – page 1 of 10.