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151 records – page 1 of 16.

Abusers' perceptions of the effect of their intimate partner violence on children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160721
Source
Violence Against Women. 2007 Nov;13(11):1179-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Emily F Rothman
David G Mandel
Jay G Silverman
Author Affiliation
Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Violence Against Women. 2007 Nov;13(11):1179-91
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Child Abuse
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Welfare
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Spouse Abuse - psychology
United States
Abstract
Little is known about how intimate partner violence (IPV) abusers perceive the effect of their violence on their children. Analyzing the attitudes and behavioral intentions of 464 partner-abusive fathers, biological fathers were found to be more likely than social fathers to express concern about the effects of their abuse on their children. However, biological fathers were no more likely than social fathers to report intentions to stop their violence or otherwise take action to mitigate the harm of IPV exposure to their children. The findings suggest that fathers' statements of concern may be poor indicators of their intentions to refrain from abusive behavior.
PubMed ID
17951591 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse effects of a social contract smoking prevention program among children in Qu├ębec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148588
Source
Tob Control. 2009 Dec;18(6):474-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
S. Kairouz
J. O'Loughlin
J. Laguë
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Concordia University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. skairouz@alcor.concordia.ca
Source
Tob Control. 2009 Dec;18(6):474-8
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Competitive Behavior
Female
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Quebec - epidemiology
School Health Services
Self Efficacy
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
To evaluate the impact of a smoke-free class competition in elementary schools in Québec, Canada before widespread dissemination of the program across the province.
In a quasiexperimental study design, 843 students in 27 schools exposed to "Mission TNT.06" were compared to 1213 students in 57 matched comparison schools. Baseline data were collected in grade 6 prior to implementation of the program. Follow-up data were collected in grade 7 after students had transitioned to secondary school.
The program improved knowledge about the harmful effects of second-hand smoke, but had no impact on knowledge about the harmful effects of smoking, attitudes about the acceptability of cigarettes, beliefs about the tobacco industry, or self-efficacy to resist peer pressure to smoke. After exposure to the program, intervention students were more likely to misreport their smoking status and to report unfavourable attitudes about classmates who smoke.
Mission TNT.06 may encourage young smokers to misreport their smoking status and to marginalise classmates who smoke. These findings prompted recommendations to conduct more in-depth evaluation of the smoke-free class competition before widespread dissemination of the program across the province.
PubMed ID
19748883 View in PubMed
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Age and gender specific sexual behaviors in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184834
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2003 Jun;27(6):579-605
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
N Kenneth Sandnabba
Pekka Santtila
Malin Wannäs
Katja Krook
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Abo Akademi University, 20500 Turku, Finland.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2003 Jun;27(6):579-605
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The purpose of the present research was to explore the sexual behaviors of 2- to 7-year-old children through reports of day-care personnel. An overall aim of this exploratory study was to provide information about the frequencies of child sexual behaviors. Also, the aim was to explore any age and gender differences.
A representative sample of 364 Finnish children not screened for developmental delay, sexual abuse history or psychiatric problems (181 girls and 183 boys) in 190 day-care centers were studied using the "Day-Care Sexuality Questionnaire" (DCSQ), with 244 sexual and other behavior items.
Age influenced more the extent of the 244 sexual behaviors of boys than of girls. In sexual behaviors increasing with age, girls showed behaviors with a more social character, whereas boys showed more explorative and information-seeking behaviors. Girls had a higher frequency of domestic and gender role exploring behaviors, whereas the boys tended to engage in explorative acting and information-seeking behaviors.
The results suggest that child sexual behavior reported by day-care personnel may provide useful information about the development of children's sexuality. Implications for sexual abuse investigations were discussed.
PubMed ID
12818609 View in PubMed
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Age of Entry Into Early Childhood Education and Care as a Predictor of Aggression: Faint and Fading Associations for Young Norwegian Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278580
Source
Psychol Sci. 2015 Oct;26(10):1595-607
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Eric Dearing
Henrik Daae Zachrisson
Ane Nærde
Source
Psychol Sci. 2015 Oct;26(10):1595-607
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aggression - psychology
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Care - organization & administration
Child Day Care Centers
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
Socioemotional risks associated with nonparental care have been debated for decades, and research findings continue to be mixed. Yet few studies have been able to test the causal hypothesis that earlier, more extensive, and longer durations of nonmaternal care lead to more problems. To examine the consequences of age of entry into nonparental care for childhood aggression, we used prospective longitudinal data from Norway, where month of birth partly determines age of entry into Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) centers. In this sample of 939 children followed from ages 6 months through 4 years, ECEC teachers reported the children's aggression when they were 2, 3, and 4 years old. We found some evidence that age of entry into ECEC predicted aggression at age 2, albeit modestly and not robustly. Between the ages of 2 and 4 years, the effect of age of entry on aggression faded to negligible levels. The implications for psychological science and policy are discussed.
PubMed ID
26276671 View in PubMed
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Anger and effortful control moderate aggressogenic thought-behaviour associations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282877
Source
Cogn Emot. 2016 08;30(5):1008-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
08-2016
Author
Sanna Roos
Ernest V E Hodges
Kätlin Peets
Christina Salmivalli
Source
Cogn Emot. 2016 08;30(5):1008-16
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression - psychology
Anger
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Self-Control - psychology
Thinking
Abstract
The effects of anger and effortful control on aggressogenic thought-behaviour associations were investigated among a total of 311 Finnish fifth and sixth graders (mean age = 11.9 years). Self-reported aggressive cognitions (i.e., normative- and self-efficacy beliefs about aggression) were expected to be associated with higher peer-reported aggressive behaviour. Teacher reported anger and effortful control were hypothesised, and found, to moderate the effects of aggressive cognitions on aggression, such that the effects were strongest for children who were high in anger and low in effortful control, as compared to other conditions. Furthermore, under the conditions of high anger and high effortful control, self-efficacy was negatively related to aggression. Thus, aggression is a result of a complex, hierarchically organised motivational system, being jointly influenced by aggressive cognitions, anger and effortful control. The findings support the importance of examining cognitive and emotional structures jointly when predicting children's aggressive behaviour.
PubMed ID
26042460 View in PubMed
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Anthropometry, body composition and body image in dieting and non-dieting 8-16-year-old Swedish girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33235
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 May;88(5):537-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
B. Edlund
P O Sjödén
M. Gebre-Medhin
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 May;88(5):537-44
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body Image
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Comparative Study
Diet
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mothers
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sweden
Weight Loss
Abstract
Anthropometry, body composition and body image were studied in 122 Swedish 8-16-y-old girls and their parents. The subjects participated in a 3-y prospective longitudinal study and were selected randomly after stratification for grades from those scoring in the upper vs. the lower thirds of the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT) score distribution. The ChEAT was completed 6 mo before the present study together with a demographic and dieting questionnaire and a questionnaire for the estimation of body size. In total 43% (n = 52) admitted ever dieting ("Dieters") and 25% (n = 30) admitted that they were currently trying to lose weight. The anthropometric and body composition data indicated that ChEAT High-scorers and Dieters were somewhat fatter than Low-scorers and Non-dieters, although this pattern was not shown among the 8-y-olds or the 14-y-olds (High-scorers). The mothers of the ChEAT High-scorers were found to be somewhat fatter than the other mothers. A current vs. ideal body shape discrepancy was shown for both High-scorers and Dieters, with a larger discrepancy for the Dieters. All groups believed that their parents were aspiring for a leaner body.
PubMed ID
10426177 View in PubMed
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"Around here, they roll up the sidewalks at night": a qualitative study of youth living in a rural Canadian community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164587
Source
Health Place. 2007 Dec;13(4):826-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Jean Shoveller
Joy Johnson
Ken Prkachin
David Patrick
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, 5804 Fairview Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. jean.shoveller@ubc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2007 Dec;13(4):826-38
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
British Columbia
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Christianity
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Residence Characteristics
Rural Population
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Social Environment
Abstract
The paper is based on an ethnographic study conducted in a rural community in British Columbia, Canada. The study examined the impact of community culture on youth's development as sexual beings. We describe how social and geographical forces intersect to affect youth's lives and trace the ways in which deprivation of various forms of capital as well as social practices contribute to some youth being located in undesirable social positions. Our findings illustrate how the effects of stigmatisation, self-segregation, and other forms of symbolic violence can extend beyond health impacts and into the broader social realm.
PubMed ID
17368073 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between risk behavior and injury and the protective roles of social environments: an analysis of 7235 Canadian school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169911
Source
Inj Prev. 2006 Apr;12(2):87-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
W. Pickett
S. Dostaler
W. Craig
I. Janssen
K. Simpson
S Danielle Shelley
W F Boyce
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, ON, Canada. PickettW@post.queensu.ca
Source
Inj Prev. 2006 Apr;12(2):87-92
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Social Environment
Social Support
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The social etiology of adolescent injury remains poorly understood. The Population Health Framework suggests that the etiology of adolescent injury involves interactions between individual risk factors and the natures of adolescent environments. The purpose of this study was to apply this framework to examination of relationships between adolescent risk taking and injury, and the potential modifying effects of supportive home and school environments.
The analysis was conducted in a representative sample of 7235 males and females (10-16 years old) from Canada. Results were based on records from the 2001/02 World Health Organization Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Survey. Individual items and factor analytically derived scales were used to describe and then model injury outcomes, risk behaviors, perceived home, and school climates, and the relationships between these variables in a theory driven etiological analysis.
Adolescents with supportive home and school environments experienced lower relative odds of engagement in risk taking behavior and lower relative odds of injury. Gradients were observed between the extent of adolescent risk taking and the occurrence of injury. Interactions were not observed between risk taking behavior, perceived support in home and school climates, and injury.
Risk taking is common among adolescents and plays a role in the etiology of injury. Supportive social climates clearly protect adolescents from engaging in these behaviors, and also the occurrence of some forms of injury. However, once an adolescent chooses to engage in risk taking behaviour, a supportive environment may not protect them from injury.
Notes
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Cites: MMWR Recomm Rep. 2001 Dec 7;50(RR-22):1-7311770577
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Cites: Health Rep. 1998 Autumn;10(2):9-20 (Eng); 9-21 (Fre)9842487
PubMed ID
16595422 View in PubMed
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[Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: the role of parent and teacher questionnaire in the assessment of patient's social-psychological adaptation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146507
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2009;109(11):53-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
N N Zavadenko
T V Lebedeva
O V Schasnaia
A N Zavadenko
O M Zlobina
N A Semenova
Author Affiliation
Kafedra nevrologii i neirokhirurgii pediatricheskogo fakul'teta Rossiiskogo gosudarstvennogo meditsinskogo universiteta, Moskva. zavadenko@mail.ru
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2009;109(11):53-7
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Development - physiology
Faculty
Female
Humans
Male
Moscow - epidemiology
Parents
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Abstract
Parents and teachers of 342 school children, aged from 7 to 11 years, were questioned with the (SDQ) using non-randomized method. The following comparative analysis of SDQ items measured in parents and teachers of children with ADHD and age-matched controls was carried out. It has been shown that the spectrum of disturbances characteristic of ADHD is not confined only to main symptoms of ADHD. The results of questionnaire of both parents and teachers indicated the marked intensity of emotional disturbances, behavioral problems and difficulties in interactions with peers as well as the underdevelopment of social trends in behavior in children with ADHD compared to the controls. The data obtained confirm the necessity of treatment extension beyond the core symptoms with considering more general parameters of the patients quality of life.
PubMed ID
20032955 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Autism and mental retardation. More attention should be paid to sibling relations when helping families with severely handicapped children in the future]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36809
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Feb 19;89(8):555-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-1992

151 records – page 1 of 16.