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[3-year follow-up of a child psychiatric cohort]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78052
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Apr 2;169(14):1317-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2-2007
Author
Bilenberg Niels
Pedersen Dorthe
Author Affiliation
Odense Universitetshospital, Det Børne- og Ungdomspsykiatriske Hus. niels.bilenberg@ouh.fyns-amt.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Apr 2;169(14):1317-21
Date
Apr-2-2007
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - diagnosis - therapy
Parents
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Publications on prospective follow-up studies of Danish child psychiatric cohorts are scarce. Such studies are necessary in order to be able to inform patients about the natural course and prognosis of child psychiatric disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Baseline data is obtained from 110 children, ie. 91 boys and 19 girls (4-13 years old) assessed in 2 child and adolescent psychiatric outpatient clinics in Denmark. As part of the baseline assessment, the children were clinically diagnosed and covered most of the child psychopathological spectrum. Baseline information included demographic data, assessment of symptom-load by means of The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and a global function score. The children in the cohort were assessed once a year using the CBCL and the Teachers Report Form (TRF). RESULTS: The symptom-load is declining, although still high during the follow-up period. The decline in total behaviour problem scores was greater in the group of children diagnosed with emotional and behavioural disorders compared to those with neuropsychiatric disorders (Attention deficits and Autism spectrum disorders). CONCLUSION: In spite of the relatively small sample size, this follow-up study identifies important issues of prognostic value in this clinical child psychiatric outpatient population. The material may be useful as a 'treatment as usual' group in future clinical outcome studies.
PubMed ID
17437695 View in PubMed
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A 22- to 25-year follow-up study of former child psychiatric patients: a register-based investigation of the course of psychiatric disorder and mortality in 546 Danish child psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34537
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Dec;94(6):397-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
P H Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Research Center, Psychiatric Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Dec;94(6):397-403
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - mortality - therapy
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - mortality - therapy
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Abstract
A total of 546 children and adolescents, aged 5 to 15 years, who were admitted as in-patients to psychiatric hospitals throughout Denmark between 1970 and 1973, were followed up with regard to later readmissions and mortality. Approximately one-third of the sample had at least one readmission after the age of 18 years; there was no significant difference between male and female subjects. Probands with three selected diagnoses, namely childhood neurosis, conduct disorder and maladjustment reactions, did have a significantly greater general risk of readmission to psychiatric hospital in adulthood than the background population. In total, 24 probands (22 male, and 2 female subjects) died during the study period. Eight subjects had committed suicide. The standard mortality rate was significantly increased.
PubMed ID
9020989 View in PubMed
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[30 years later: children attending a counseling service up to 3 years of age]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33638
Source
Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr. 1998 Sep;47(7):477-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
P. de Château
Author Affiliation
Academisch Centrum Kinder- en Jeugd-psychiatrie Oost-Nederland, Nijmegen.
Source
Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr. 1998 Sep;47(7):477-85
Date
Sep-1998
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Child Guidance Clinics
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Personality Development
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
From 1953 through 1955 a total of 2364 individuals between o and 18 years were discharged from the Stockholm Child Guidance Clinics. Among these patients 125 (68 boys, 57 girls) were under the age of 3 years. A follow-up study was conducted 30 years later on this sample using records from psychiatric clinics and data from official registers of problematic behaviours. The majority of the infants when seen at the Child Guidance Clinics were judged to be mentally healthy or to have shown mild environmental reactions. However sixty per cent of these patients were identified in at least one of the registers during the follow-up period. Thus the initial evaluation was not prognostic of the future development. Boys developed mainly social maladjustment, whereas girls more often applied for psychiatric care during the follow-up. Significant prognostic factors in the 1950s were gender and parental psychiatric diagnosis.
PubMed ID
9796360 View in PubMed
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[31 women with drug problems got children--what happened after that?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9974
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2001
Author
A. Sundfaer
Author Affiliation
Barne- og ungdomspsykiatrisk poliklinikk Ullevål sykehus 0407 Oslo. bupull@online.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):73-5
Date
Jan-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Child Behavior
Child Development
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - psychology
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The intention of this study was to increase the knowledge concerning the rehabilitation of women with drug problems after the birth of a child and to find out how the children developed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A follow-up study of 31 women, former drug and alcohol abusers and their children, 19 girls and 12 boys born in 1982-1983. The first survey took place when the children were 2-3 years of age, then when they were 7-9 and at last when they were 15-17. The biological mothers, foster or adoptive mothers, the children and their teachers were interviewed. RESULTS: The women got more support and control during the pregnancy than afterwards. Most of the mothers became single. Women with the shortest drug history, a good social network and a stable partner without drug problems kept the care of their children. By the first survey (1985), seven children had been placed in foster homes, in the second (1992) two further children had been taken away from their mothers, and in the third (1999) only one third of the children were living with their biological mothers. Most of the children did well at school and in their families, had friends and leisure activities despite still living by their mothers or in foster/adoption homes. None of the youngsters had been in conflict with the law or were drug abusers, but every second teenage girl needed psychological support. Children who had been stable by their drug-free biological mothers functioned best. INTERPRETATION: Mothers with drug problems do not get sufficient attention after the delivery and when the children grow up. A supporting family should be brought in contact with mother and child after the delivery. Under special circumstances pregnancy can be a positive turning point for women with drug problems.
PubMed ID
12013619 View in PubMed
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The 1978 national survey of smoking habits of Canadian school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237316
Source
Can J Public Health. 1986 Mar-Apr;77(2):139-46
Publication Type
Article

Abusers' perceptions of the effect of their intimate partner violence on children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160721
Source
Violence Against Women. 2007 Nov;13(11):1179-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Emily F Rothman
David G Mandel
Jay G Silverman
Author Affiliation
Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Violence Against Women. 2007 Nov;13(11):1179-91
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Child Abuse
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Welfare
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Spouse Abuse - psychology
United States
Abstract
Little is known about how intimate partner violence (IPV) abusers perceive the effect of their violence on their children. Analyzing the attitudes and behavioral intentions of 464 partner-abusive fathers, biological fathers were found to be more likely than social fathers to express concern about the effects of their abuse on their children. However, biological fathers were no more likely than social fathers to report intentions to stop their violence or otherwise take action to mitigate the harm of IPV exposure to their children. The findings suggest that fathers' statements of concern may be poor indicators of their intentions to refrain from abusive behavior.
PubMed ID
17951591 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of an emotional and behavioural screening tool for children in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in urban NSW.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140192
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;44(10):894-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Anna Williamson
Sally Redman
Mark Dadds
John Daniels
Catherine D'Este
Beverley Raphael
Sandra Eades
Tracey Skinner
Author Affiliation
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. anna.williamson@saxinstitute.org.au
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;44(10):894-900
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child Welfare
Community Health Services
Emotions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental health
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Psychological Tests
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Abstract
To assess the acceptability and face validity of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHOs) located in the greater Sydney region.
A qualitative study was conducted in three ACCHOs located within the greater Sydney region in 2008-2009. A semi-structured approach was used in focus groups and small group interviews (n = 47) to elicit participants' views on the appropriateness of the SDQ and any additional issues of importance to Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health.
The SDQ was found to cover many important aspects of Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health, however, the wording of some questions was considered ambiguous and some critical issues are not explored. The peer relationships subscale did not appear to fit well with Aboriginal concepts of the relative importance of different interpersonal relationships.
Overall the SDQ was acceptable in ACCHOs in Sydney; however, changes to the wording of some questions and the response scale may be indicated to improve cultural appropriateness and clarity. A further set of issues which are not covered by any commonly used screening tools but are of critical importance to Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health should also be considered by clinicians.
PubMed ID
20932203 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accepting parental responsibility: "future questioning" as a means to avoid foster home placement of children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224567
Source
Child Welfare. 1992 Jan-Feb;71(1):3-17
Publication Type
Article

Accidents in childhood: relation to psychosocial conditions and mental development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11270
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1996 Mar;85(3):285-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
J O Larsson
G. Aurelius
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Woman and Child Health, St Göran Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1996 Mar;85(3):285-91
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Alcoholism
Child
Child Abuse
Child Behavior
Family Health
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Abstract
In a longitudinal cohort study we investigated if children experiencing psychosocial stress and exhibiting certain psychopathological symptoms run a higher risk of having accidents than other children. In 366 children the number of hospital-treated casualties during the first 10 years of their lives was related to the physical and mental characteristics of the children and to the social conditions in their families. Boys had a higher number of accidents when one or both of the parents were known to have alcohol problems. Girls exhibiting symptoms of depression, anxiety and problems in social relationships at 4-5 years of age had more accidents than girls without such symptoms. However, the differences in accident rates were small, perhaps due to the physical environment in the housing areas and the general attitude, both aiming towards reducing childhood accidents.
PubMed ID
8695982 View in PubMed
Less detail

Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist and Teachers' Report Form in a normative sample of Greek children 6-12 years old.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200370
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999 Sep;8(3):165-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
A. Roussos
G. Karantanos
C. Richardson
C. Hartman
D. Karajiannis
S. Kyprianos
H. Lazaratou
O. Mahaira
M. Tassi
V. Zoubou
Author Affiliation
Attiki Child Psychiatry Hospital, 4 Garefi Street, 115 25 Athens, Greece. alrousou@ath.forthnet.gr
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999 Sep;8(3):165-72
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Female
Greece
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Reference Values
Schools
Sensitivity and specificity
Urban Population
Abstract
Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Teachers' Report Form (TRF) were administered to 6-12 year old school children comprising a large random community sample (n = 1200) drawn from the whole of Greece. These are the first data on the TRF in Greece and the first nation-wide data on the CBCL. Appropriate cutoff points for the behavioral problems and competence scales of both questionnaires were obtained for boys and girls. These were considerably higher than USA cutoffs for the CBCL but not for the TRF. Analysis of scores in relation to degree of urbanization showed that it was not necessary to define different cutoffs in different strata. Parents' and teachers' ratings of the same child were most highly correlated for Externalizing and Aggressive behavior for boys and for Attention problems for both sexes.
PubMed ID
10550697 View in PubMed
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1113 records – page 1 of 112.