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Abuse prevalence and victim gender among adult and adolescent child molesters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186694
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2003 Mar-Apr;26(2):179-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Scott Aylwin
Lea H Studer
John R Reddon
Steven R Clelland
Author Affiliation
Phoenix Program, Forensic Psychiatric Services, Alberta Hospital Edmonton, 17480 Fort Road, Box 307, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T5J 2J7. scott.aylwin@amhb.ab.ca
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2003 Mar-Apr;26(2):179-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - classification
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Prisoners - psychology
Residential Treatment
PubMed ID
12581754 View in PubMed
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Abusive relationships in families of women with borderline personality disorder, anorexia nervosa and a control group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193394
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2001 Aug;189(8):522-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
L. Laporte
H. Guttman
Author Affiliation
Allan Memorial Institute, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2001 Aug;189(8):522-31
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nuclear Family - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
In a group of intact families, we examined the rates and parameters of verbal, physical, and sexual abuse in 35 women with borderline personality disorder (BPD), 34 women with anorexia nervosa (AN), and 33 women without a clinical history (NC); their experience of multiple abuse and its correlation with their SCL-90-R scores; and their reports of abuse of their siblings. Corroboration of abuse was obtained from some parents in each group. Women with BPD suffered more intrafamilial verbal and physical abuse. Whereas AN and NC women experienced relatively rare single events of extrafamilial sexual abuse at an older age, those with BPD suffered repeated intrafamilial sexual abuse at a younger age and also suffered more multiple abuse. All multiply abused women had more psychopathology. Siblings were reported abused in the same proportions as subjects; many parents of BPDs corroborated their daughters' reports of all three forms of abuse.
PubMed ID
11531204 View in PubMed
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[A case of sexual abuse with several victims in a small municipality. A cooperation project between health services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34559
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Nov 30;116(29):3506-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1996
Author
M. Horneland
A M Hanstad
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk poliklinikk adveling Stavanger Rogaland psykiatriske sjukehus, Hillevåg, Stavanger.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Nov 30;116(29):3506-8
Date
Nov-30-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - therapy
Community Health Services
English Abstract
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Psychotherapy, Group
Social Support
Abstract
This article describes the management of an extensive case of sexual abuse in a small Norwegian community. The victims were adult men who had been exploited in childhood and adolescence by the same abuser. A demand for support was addressed to the health services when these men realised as adults that they shared this experience. The community health service and the psychiatric department decided to arrange psycho-educative meetings in the community centre. Victims, their families and local professional helpers were invited. The meetings gave general information about sexual abuse, early and late symptoms and the treatment facilities available locally. In one facility a psychiatrist and a general practitioner led a treatment group together. Five of the victims took part in this group. Fortunately, this case never reached the public press. Cooperation between specialist and community health services in managing such cases is regarded as essential.
PubMed ID
9019860 View in PubMed
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Adolescent sexual offenders: a total survey of referrals to Social Services in Sweden and subgroup characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79586
Source
Sex Abuse. 2006 Oct;18(4):357-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Kjellgren Cecilia
Wassberg Annika
Carlberg Margareta
Långström Niklas
Svedin Carl Göran
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Lund University, SE 221 85, Lund, Sweden. Cecilia.Kjellgren@med.lu.se
Source
Sex Abuse. 2006 Oct;18(4):357-72
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Social Welfare
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Sampling methodology (e.g. population-based vs. clinical samples, anonymous self-reports vs. data collected as part of mandated treatment) affects the validity of conclusions drawn from research addressing the etiology of adolescent sexual offending. Studies of unselected samples allow testing of the generalizability of etiological models suggested from investigation of selected clinical or forensic populations. Further, representative epidemiological data on adolescent sexual offending is needed for policy-making and the planning of services. We conducted a national survey of all adolescent sexual offenders (ASOs, 12-17 years) referred to Social Services during 2000. Social workers at all child and adolescent units in Social Service authorities throughout Sweden (N=285, 99% response rate) completed a questionnaire about new ASO referrals in 2000. The National Board of Health and Welfare commissioned the survey and questionnaire items tapped offender, offence, and victim characteristics. A total of 197 boys and 2 girls aged 12-17 years were referred to Social Services because of sexually abusive behavior in 2000. Focusing specifically on males, this yielded a one-year incidence of .060% (95% confidence interval = .052-.068). Forty-six percent of male ASOs abused at least one child younger than age 12 years (child offenders) whereas the rest had abused peer or adult victims (peer offenders). Forty-two percent of male ASOs had ever committed sexual offences together with at least one other offender (group offenders). Child- vs. peer offenders and group vs. single offenders, suggested typologies in the literature, were compared to explore potential subtype-specific risk factors and correlates. The results suggested a higher proportion of group ASOs than previously reported and stronger support for subdividing ASOs into child vs. peer offenders than into group vs. single ASOs.
PubMed ID
17136628 View in PubMed
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Adult reports of child and adult attributions of blame for childhood sexual abuse: predicting adult adjustment and suicidal behaviors in females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192431
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2001 Oct;25(10):1329-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
S L Barker-Collo
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2001 Oct;25(10):1329-41
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Humans
Memory
Mental health
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Rationalization
Self Concept
Self Disclosure
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine whether reports made by adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse about attributions of blame made during childhood and adulthood are predictive of overall adulthood symptomatology and presence of suicide attempts.
126 female survivors of childhood sexual abuse completed anonymous survey packages which included a modified version of the Attributional Style Questionnaire, the Trauma Symptom Checklist-40, and questions regarding demographics and abuse characteristics.
The study revealed that participants reporting abuse by an immediate family member and abuse before 10 years of age tended to report having made internal attributions of blame when they were children. In addition, reports of internal attributions of blame made during childhood were significantly predictive of overall adulthood symptomatology, as well as presence of suicide attempts. Reported adulthood attributions did not contribute to prediction.
The clinical implications of further evidence of the link between attributions and outcome following childhood sexual abuse including the need for identification and intervention to address internal attributions made during childhood are discussed.
PubMed ID
11720382 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and drug abuse among sexual and nonsexual offenders: relationship to intimacy deficits and coping strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178703
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Jun;16(3):177-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Jan Looman
Jeffrey Abracen
Roberto DiFazio
Greg Maillet
Author Affiliation
Regional Treatment Centre, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Sex Abuse. 2004 Jun;16(3):177-89
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emotions
Female
Humans
Incest - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Three groups of subjects (N = 95) consisting or rapists, child molesters, and a comparison group of violent offenders were examined with reference to history of alcohol abuse, history of drug abuse, intimacy deficits, and emotionally based coping strategies. No differences were found between the two groups of sex offenders on any of the measures examined. Sex offenders were found to be significantly older than the comparison group. When age was entered as a covariate sex offenders were found to have significantly more difficulties with alcohol use as measured by the Michigan Alcohol Screening Test (MAST) and were significantly more likely to use emotionally based coping strategies as measured by the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS). No differences were found between any of the groups with reference to drug abuse as measured by the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST). Results are discussed in terms of Marshall's theory of intimacy deficits in sexual offenders.
PubMed ID
15326879 View in PubMed
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Analytic versus systemic group therapy for women with a history of child sexual abuse: 1-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259757
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Henriette Elkjaer
Ellids Kristensen
Erik L Mortensen
Stig Poulsen
Marianne Lau
Source
Psychol Psychother. 2014 Jun;87(2):191-208
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Interpersonal Relations
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Abstract
This randomized prospective study examines durability of improvement in general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning and interpersonal problems, and compares the long-term efficacy of analytic and systemic group psychotherapy in women 1 year after completion of treatment for childhood sexual abuse.
Women (n = 106) randomly assigned to analytic or systemic psychotherapy completed the Symptom Checklist-90-R, Global Assessment of Functioning, Global Life Quality, Registration Chart Questionnaire, and Flashback Registration at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at a 1-year follow-up.
Post-treatment gains were significant for both treatment modalities on all measures, but significantly larger after systemic therapy. Significant treatment response was maintained 1-year post-treatment, but different trajectories were observed: 1 year after treatment completion, improvements for analytic therapy were maintained, whereas they decreased after systemic therapy, resulting in no statistically significant difference in gains between the groups at the 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining significant gains, more than half of the patients remained above cut-off for caseness concerning general symptomatology at post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up.
The findings stress the importance of long-term follow-up data in effect studies. Different trajectories were associated with the two treatments, but improvement in the two treatment groups did not differ significantly at the 1-year follow-up. Implications of the difference in trajectories for treatment planning are discussed.
Both analytic and systemic group therapy proved efficient in improving general symptomatology, psychosocial functioning, and interpersonal problems in women with a history of CSA and gains were maintained at a 1-year follow-up. Despite maintaining statistically significant gains at the 1-year follow-up, 54% of the patients remained above the cut-off for caseness with respect to general symptomatology, which may indicate a need for further treatment. Different pre-post follow-up treatment trajectories were observed between the two treatment modalities. Thus, while systemic group therapy showed a significantly better outcome immediately after termination, gains in the systemic treatment group decreased during follow-up, while gains were maintained during follow-up in analytic group therapy.
PubMed ID
24014477 View in PubMed
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An exploratory study of child molesters' relationship patterns using the core conflictual relationship theme method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181234
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2004 Feb;19(2):264-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Martin Drapeau
Yves de Roten
Annett C Körner
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. martin.drapeau@mcgill.ca
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2004 Feb;19(2):264-75
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Cluster analysis
Conflict (Psychology)
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
This study examined the relationship patterns of N = 20 child molesters (CM) using the Core Conflictual Relationship Theme (CCRT) method. The relationship patterns of the CMs were compared with those of a control group of N = 20 subjects from an out patient counseling service. Results showed that CMs had significantly less wish to be controlled, hurt, and not responsible than the control group. No significant difference was found between both groups for the CCRT response of other component (RO). For the response of self (RS) component, results indicated that CMs reported more relationship episodes in which they felt respected and accepted and self-controlled and self-confident. The authors suggest that these interactions could be indicators of the CMs'attempts to attribute blame to others and present themselves as victims. It is also suggested that CMs may have core issues involving autonomy and control.
PubMed ID
15006004 View in PubMed
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Are stressful life events causally related to the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms? A monozygotic twin difference study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270866
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2015 Feb;30(2):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
P. Vidal-Ribas
A. Stringaris
C. Rück
E. Serlachius
P. Lichtenstein
D. Mataix-Cols
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2015 Feb;30(2):309-16
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Cohort Studies
Depression - etiology
Diseases in Twins - etiology
Family Conflict
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Twins, Dizygotic - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - psychology
Abstract
Traumatic or stressful life events have long been hypothesized to play a role in causing or precipitating obsessive-compulsive symptoms but the impact of these environmental factors has rarely been investigated using genetically informative designs. We tested whether a wide range of retrospectively-reported stressful life events (SLEs) influence the lifetime presence and severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) in a large Swedish population-based cohort of 22,084 twins. Multiple regression models examined whether differences in SLEs within twin pairs were significantly associated with differences in OCS. In the entire sample (i.e., both monozygotic [MZ] and dizygotic twin pairs), two SLEs factors, "abuse and family disruption" and "sexual abuse", were significantly associated with the severity of OCS even after controlling for depressive symptoms. Other SLEs factors were either not associated with OCS ("loss", "non-sexual assault") or were no longer associated with OCS after controlling for depression ("illness/injury"). Within MZ pair analyses, which effectively control for genetic and shared environmental effects, showed that only the "abuse and family disruption" factor remained independently related to within-pair differences in OCS severity, even after controlling for depressive symptoms. Despite being statistically significant, the magnitude of the associations was small; "abuse and family disruption" explained approximately 3% of the variance in OCS severity. We conclude that OCS are selectively associated with certain types of stressful life events. In particular, a history of interpersonal abuse, neglect and family disruption may make a modest but significant contribution to the severity of OCS. Further replication in longitudinal cohorts is essential before causality can be firmly established.
Notes
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Erratum In: Eur Psychiatry. 2015 Jul;30(5):664
PubMed ID
25511316 View in PubMed
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Associations between sexual abuse and family conflict/violence, self-injurious behavior, and substance use: the mediating role of depressed mood and anger.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135401
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2011 Mar;35(3):210-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Bryndis Bjork Asgeirsdottir
Inga Dora Sigfusdottir
Gisli H Gudjonsson
Jon Fridrik Sigurdsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF, UK.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2011 Mar;35(3):210-9
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anger
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - etiology - psychology
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Iceland
Linear Models
Male
Questionnaires
Schools
Self-Assessment
Self-Injurious Behavior - etiology - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Students
Substance-Related Disorders - etiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior and substance use.
A cross-sectional national survey was conducted including 9,085 16-19 year old students attending all high schools in Iceland in 2004. Participants reported frequency of sexual abuse, family conflict/violence, self-injurious behavior, substance use, depressed mood, and anger.
Sexual abuse and family conflict/violence had direct effects on self-injurious behavior and substance use among both genders, when controlling for age, family structure, parental education, anger, and depressed mood. More importantly, the indirect effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior among both males and females were twice as strong through depressed mood as through anger, while the indirect effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on substance use were only significant through anger.
These results indicate that in cases of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence, substance use is similar to externalizing behavior, where anger seems to be a key mediating variable, opposed to internalizing behavior such as self-injurious behavior, where depressed mood is a more critical mediator.
Practical implications highlight the importance of focusing on a range of emotions, including depressed mood and anger, when working with stressed adolescents in prevention and treatment programs for self-injurious behavior and substance use.
PubMed ID
21481460 View in PubMed
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131 records – page 1 of 14.