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108 records – page 1 of 11.

Ability OnLine: children in hospital now in touch with the world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214112
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Lefebvre
M. McClure
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Communication Aids for Disabled
Computer Communication Networks - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology
Humans
Organizational Innovation
Peer Group
Self Concept
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Abstract
Health prevention seeks to avoid the onset of disease or symptoms by eliminating or at least minimizing environmental factors that increase the risk of illness. This article describes Ability OnLine, an innovative program designed to reduce the isolation young people can experience in a healthcare facility or when confined to their home. The electronic bulletin board is a friendly platform for disabled and chronically ill children to easily communicate with their peers and adult and teen mentors.
PubMed ID
10172531 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Soins Pediatr Pueric. 2004 Aug;(219):33-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004

Art in the hospital: treating the mind as well as the body.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236283
Source
CMAJ. 1986 Nov 15;135(10):1198-9, 1202-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1986

[A study of patients with anorexia nervosa in Gavleborg. More boys than girls required intensive care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31866
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 17;98(42):4578-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-17-2001
Author
P H Jonsson
Author Affiliation
Barn- och ungdomspsykiatriska kliniken, Hälsinglands sjukhus, Hudiksvall. per.p.jonsson@lg.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 17;98(42):4578-82
Date
Oct-17-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anorexia Nervosa - mortality - psychology - therapy
Attitude to Health
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intensive Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient compliance
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
In the early 1970's British doctors (Beaumont et al) published clinical findings and concluded that anorexia nervosa is a disease occurring in both sexes. Until then it had been considered a female disease only. A number of studies have reported a rather poor outcome for boys and men. In a Danish study infertility was noted in affected men. The aim of this study is to describe typical arrays of clinical data in order to assess attitudes and values concerning the effect of treatment on 28 teenagers out of a total of 48 children and adolescents. A sociometric questionnaire was used to assess the youngsters' knowledge of their disease, their opinions concerning the competence of staff, their feelings concerning treatment, including parental involvement in therapy and medications used, as well as their opinions concerning the results of treatment. All boys are alive (in 1999), 19 years after falling ill. The boys were much more reluctant to accept inpatient care than were the girls, who seem to show greater autonomy. Participants' final appraisal of treatment is slightly positive, whereas in the hypothetical situation that a friend might fall ill with an eating disorder, a sizeable majority would recommend contact with child psychiatry.
PubMed ID
11715231 View in PubMed
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Behavior in four-year-olds who have experienced hospitalization and day care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39116
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1986 Oct;56(4):612-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1986
Author
G. Elander
A. Nilsson
T. Lindberg
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1986 Oct;56(4):612-6
Date
Oct-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Conditions
Sweden
Abstract
Behavior of 535 four-year-old children was investigated in relation to their earlier experiences of hospitalization and day care. Results show significant behavioral differences between hospitalized and nonhospitalized children who had attended day care, none between those who had not. Repeated hospital admission increased the behavioral differences in the day care children.
PubMed ID
3789107 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Med Technol. 1984 Dec;46(4):232-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984

Bodily and verbal expressions of postoperative symptoms in 3- to 6-year-old boys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87165
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2008 Feb;23(1):65-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Wennström Berith
Bergh Ingrid
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Caring Sciences, Göteborg University, Sweden. berith.wennstroem@telia.com
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2008 Feb;23(1):65-76
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anxiety - diagnosis - psychology
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Psychology
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cryptorchidism - surgery
Facial Expression
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Kinesics
Male
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Pain Measurement - methods - nursing - psychology
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - psychology
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - psychology
Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting - diagnosis - psychology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweden
Uncertainty
Verbal Behavior
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate how small boys between 3 and 6 years of age describe bodily and verbal expressions of postoperative symptoms. The data collection was carried out at a large general hospital in Sweden and included both participant observations and semistructured interviews. The results provided a description of how 3- to 6-year-old boys bodily and verbally express postoperative symptoms. The results also showed that small children have difficulties in distinguishing pain, nausea, and anxiety and that postoperative discomfort was experienced in many different ways.
PubMed ID
18207049 View in PubMed
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Case Study. Art therapy with a native Alaskan girl on a pediatric ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39578
Source
Am J Art Ther. 1985 May;23(4):126-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1985

Child in hospital: family experiences and expectations of how nurses can promote family health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176477
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2005 Feb;14(2):212-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Hanna Hopia
Patricia S Tomlinson
Eija Paavilainen
Päivi Astedt-Kurki
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. hanna.hopia@jypoly.fi
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2005 Feb;14(2):212-22
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anxiety - prevention & control - psychology
Attitude to Health
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Chronic Disease - nursing - psychology
Cost of Illness
Family - psychology
Family Health
Family Nursing - methods
Finland
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
This study set out to explore, from the family's point of view, ways in which nursing staff can promote family health during the child's hospital stay.
Having a child in hospital is a major source of stress and anxiety for the whole family. Earlier studies have described parental coping strategies, ways to strengthen those strategies and to support parental participation in child care, but no one has studied the promotion of family health during the child's hospitalization from the family's point of view.
Interviews were conducted in 2002 with 29 families who had a child with a chronic illness which were receiving or had received treatment on the paediatric wards of two Finnish hospitals.
Data analysis was based on the grounded theory method, proceeding to the stage of axial coding. Data collection and analysis phases proceeded simultaneously.
Five domains were distinguished in the promotion of family health: (1) reinforcing parenthood, (2) looking after the child's welfare, (3) sharing the emotional burden, (4) supporting everyday coping and (5) creating a confidential care relationship.
The results strengthen the knowledge base of family nursing by showing how nursing staff can promote family health during the child's hospital stay.
The results have a number of practical applications for nursing, both for clinical practice and research. The results can be used in paediatric hospital wards caring for chronically ill children and their families. The five domains of family health promotion described here should be tested in other paediatric wards and in other geographical locations.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Nurs. 2005 May;14(5):650-115840081
Comment In: J Clin Nurs. 2006 Jan;15(1):111-316390531
PubMed ID
15669930 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child life intervention in the emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239775
Source
Child Health Care. 1984;12(3):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
D. Alcock
S. Berthiaume
A. Clarke
Source
Child Health Care. 1984;12(3):130-6
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Ontario
Abstract
Since 1979, the Child Life Department of the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario has provided 75 hours per week of Child Life intervention for children and parents in the emergency department. Factors that would influence a child's ability to master an emergency experience have been identified through a review of the literature. The protocol for Child Life intervention in frequent emergency situations is described. Practical approaches to Child Life programs in Emergency and evaluation of effects of Child Life intervention are discussed.
PubMed ID
10264991 View in PubMed
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108 records – page 1 of 11.