Skip header and navigation

Refine By

18 records – page 1 of 2.

Source
J Assoc Physicians India. 2008 Aug;56:612
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
P. Rangappa
Author Affiliation
Intensive Care Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital, South Australia- 5011.
Source
J Assoc Physicians India. 2008 Aug;56:612
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia - history
Chemistry - history
Critical Care - history
Famous Persons
History, 18th Century
Humans
Indian Ocean Islands
Oxygen - history
Philately
Research - history
Sweden
PubMed ID
19051707 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1973;433:25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973
Author
A H Ostergaard
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1973;433:25-30
Date
1973
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calcium
Chemistry - history
Denmark
History, 18th Century
Humans
Uric acid
Urinary Bladder Calculi - history
PubMed ID
4575145 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appreciated abroad, depreciated at home. The career of a radiochemist in Norway: Ellen Gleditsch (1879-1968).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173899
Source
Isis. 2004 Dec;95(4):576-609
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Annette Lykknes
Lise Kvittingen
Anne Kristine Børresen
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway. Annette.Lykknes@chem.ntnu.no
Source
Isis. 2004 Dec;95(4):576-609
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemistry - history
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Medical Laboratory Personnel - history
Norway
Paris
Physicians, Women - history
Radiology - history
Research Personnel - history
United States
Abstract
Ellen Gleditsch (1879-1968) became Norway's first authority on radioactivity and the country's second female full professor. From her many years abroad--in Marie Curie's laboratory in Paris and at Yale University in New Haven with Bertram Boltram--she became internationally acknowledged and developed an extensive personal and scientific network. In the Norwegian scientific community she was, however, less appreciated, and her appointment as a professor in 1929 caused controversy. Despite the recommendation of the expert committee, her predecessor and his allies spread the view that Gleditsch was a diligent but outdated researcher with little scientific promise-a view that apparently persists in the Norwegian chemical community today. In addition to her scientific work, Gleditsch acquired political influence by joining the International Federation of University Women in 1920; she later became the president of both the Norwegian section and the worldwide organization. She worked in particular to establish scholarships enabling women to go abroad.
PubMed ID
16011295 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Biophysics at the turn of the new millenium: perfluorocarbon media and gas-transporting blood substitutes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195464
Source
Biofizika. 2001 Jan-Feb;46(1):5-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
G R Ivanitskii
Author Affiliation
Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow Region, 142290 Russia.
Source
Biofizika. 2001 Jan-Feb;46(1):5-33
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Substitutes - chemistry - history - therapeutic use
Clinical Trials as Topic - history
Fluorocarbons - chemistry - history - therapeutic use
History, 20th Century
Humans
Rheology
Russia
USSR
Abstract
The results of 20-year investigations of perfluorocarbon gas-transporting emulsions for biological and medical applications performed by russian biophysicists together with chemists and clinicists are reviewed. As a result of these investigations, the blood substitute perftoran was created. Now this commercial blood substitute has different applications in clinics of Russia and other countries.
PubMed ID
11236562 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collaboration of Art and Science in Albert Edelfelt's Portrait of Louis Pasteur: The Making of an Enduring Medical Icon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265757
Source
Bull Hist Med. 2015;89(1):59-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Richard E Weisberg
Bert Hansen
Source
Bull Hist Med. 2015;89(1):59-91
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemistry - history
France
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Microbiology - history
Paintings - history
Portraits as Topic - history
Sweden
Abstract
Historians of medicine--and even Louis Pasteur's biographers--have paid little attention to his close relationship with the Finnish artist Albert Edelfelt. A new look at Edelfelt's letters to his mother, written in Swedish and never quoted at length in English, reveals important aspects of Pasteur's working habits and personality. By understanding the active collaboration through which this very famous portrait was made, we also discover unnoticed things in the painting itself, gain a new appreciation of its original impact on the French public's image of science, and better understand its enduring influence on the portrayal of medicine in the art and the popular culture of many countries even to the present day.
PubMed ID
25913463 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Capill Electrophor Microchip Technol. 1999 May-Aug;6(3-4):3A-5A
Publication Type
Article

Elements in the Melting Pot: Merging Chemistry, Assaying, and Natural History, Ca. 1730-60.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264954
Source
Osiris. 2014;29:230-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Hjalmar Fors
Source
Osiris. 2014;29:230-44
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemistry - history
History, 18th Century
Metals - analysis - chemistry - history
Sweden
Abstract
This essay examines how the modern concept of the chemical element emerged during the eighteenth century. It traces this concept to a group of assayers, mineralogists, and chemists active at the Swedish Bureau of Mines (Bergskollegium). Driven by a deep ontological pragmatism, these "mining chemists" came to regard all inquiries into the component parts of metals as useless speculation. Instead, metals were treated as immutable species that made mineralogical taxonomy possible. Their work was a form of Enlightenment boundary work, which associated chrysopoeia and the pursuit of the components of metals with superstition and disreputable activities such as astrology.
PubMed ID
26103757 View in PubMed
Less detail

History of bioavailable lead and iron in the Greater North Sea and Iceland during the last millennium - a bivalve sclerochronological reconstruction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258745
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2014 Oct 15;87(1-2):104-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2014
Author
Hilmar A Holland
Bernd R Schöne
Soraya Marali
Klaus P Jochum
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2014 Oct 15;87(1-2):104-16
Date
Oct-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Shells - chemistry
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - methods
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
History, Medieval
Iceland
Iron - chemistry
Lead - chemistry
Metals - chemistry
North Sea
Water Pollutants, Chemical - chemistry - history
Abstract
We present the first annually resolved record of biologically available Pb and Fe in the Greater North Sea and Iceland during 1040-2004 AD based on shells of the long-lived marine bivalve Arctica islandica. The iron content in pre-industrial shells from the North Sea largely remained below the detection limit. Only since 1830, shell Fe levels rose gradually reflecting the combined effect of increased terrestrial runoff of iron-bearing sediments and eutrophication. Although the lead gasoline peak of the 20th century was well recorded by the shells, bivalves that lived during the medieval heyday of metallurgy showed four-fold higher shell Pb levels than modern specimens. Presumably, pre-industrial bivalves were offered larger proportions of resuspended (Pb-enriched) organics, whereas modern specimens receive fresh increased amounts of (Pb-depleted) phytoplankton. As expected, metal loads in the shells from Iceland were much lower. Our study confirms that bivalve shells provide a powerful tool for retrospective environmental biomonitoring.
PubMed ID
25176274 View in PubMed
Less detail

One person's food: how and why fish avoidance may affect the settlement and subsistence patterns of hunter-gatherers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196267
Source
Am Antiq. 2001 Jan;66(1):141-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001

18 records – page 1 of 2.