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40 records – page 1 of 4.

137Cs in puddle sediments as timescale tracer in urban environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268380
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2015 Apr;142:9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Andrian A Seleznev
Ilia V Yarmoshenko
Alexander P Sergeev
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2015 Apr;142:9-13
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Cities
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Radiation monitoring
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
The (137)Cs-based chronological approach is suggested to identify the age of urban landscapes and the chronology of pollution of soil in residential areas. Three main pivot points constitute the basis of the chronological approach: beginning of the Atomic Era in 1945, the maximum input in 1963 and the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Application of (137)Cs as a timescale tracer was tested on the example of Ekaterinburg, a city in the Middle Urals region of Russia. The sampling of recent urban sediments of micro water bodies (puddles) was carried out in 210 locations in 2007-2010. The concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Mn and Fe, and activity concentrations of (137)Cs were measured. It was found that the (137)Cs concentrations in the puddle sediments correlated with the age of surrounding buildings determined by the year of construction. The correlations between the concentrations of metals and (137)Cs in the puddle sediments identified the major pollutants of the urban area, assessing their background concentrations and obtaining the average annual inputs.
PubMed ID
25615884 View in PubMed
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The Chernobyl accident. Transport of radionuclides to man living in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233948
Source
Acta Oncol. 1988;27(6b):841-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
L. Olofsson
H. Svensson
Author Affiliation
Radiation Physics Department, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1988;27(6b):841-9
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis
Sweden
Ukraine
Abstract
The pathways of 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs from the Chernobyl fallout to man were followed in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. Reported airplane measurements had shown that the ground deposition of 137Cs was 3-40 kBq/m2 with hot spots with more than 80 kBq/m2. Multiplying with a factor of 0.6 gave the 134Cs deposition and an approximate factor of 20 the 131I ground deposition. The effective dose equivalent from 131I became low, less than 0.1 mSv, as the cows were stabled. The 137Cs activity concentration in different types of food was measured in approximately 8,000 samples. The most important sources of Cs intake in man were lake fish, elk (European moose) and reindeer. Variations with time was studied in detail for four types of lake fish. Whole-body measurements on more than 250 persons showed that no group of people on average received more than 1 mSv from food during the first year after the Chernobyl accident. However, single persons eating large amounts of reindeer meat received up to 2.5 mSv. People buying all their food in ordinary provision-shops got less than 0.1 mSv from the food during the first year. The present level of 90Sr activity concentration in man will only give an effective dose equivalent of 0.004 mSv/year, most of it being a result of the atmospheric nuclear bomb tests.
PubMed ID
3233171 View in PubMed
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Chernobyl--the radiological impact on Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233454
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 1988 Mar;39(1):37-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
W. Huda
A M Sourkes
B L Tracy
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Physics, Manitoba Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 1988 Mar;39(1):37-41
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Animals
Canada
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - analysis
Milk - analysis
Nuclear Reactors
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis
Rain
Ruthenium Radioisotopes - analysis
Ukraine
Abstract
On 26 April 1986, an accident at a Ukrainian nuclear reactor at Chernobyl triggered the release of large quantities of fission products into the atmosphere. After 7 May 1986 measurable quantities of ruthenium-103, iodine-131, cesium-134, and cesium-137 were detected in environmental sampling carried out in all regions of Canada. Maximum airborne concentrations for each radionuclide were of the order of a few mBq.m-3 and contaminated milk samples on average contained less than 1Bq.L-1 of iodine-131 and cesium-137. The mean value of the effective dose equivalent for an adult Canadian in the two months following the accident is calculated to be 0.28 microSv. As this total radiation dose is about 10(-33) of the dose from natural background during the same period, the resultant radiological detriment is concluded to be negligible.
PubMed ID
2966167 View in PubMed
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Comparative pathway analysis of radiocesium in the Hudson River Estuary: environmental measurements and regulatory dose assessment models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236614
Source
Health Phys. 1986 Sep;51(3):295-312
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1986
Author
P. Linsalata
D. Hickman
N. Cohen
Source
Health Phys. 1986 Sep;51(3):295-312
Date
Sep-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Drinking
Environmental monitoring
Fishes
Fresh Water
Humans
Mathematics
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Water Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This work summarizes the measurements and associated environmental dosimetry of reactor-released 137Cs and 134Cs and weapons-produced 137Cs in samples of water, shoreline sediment and fish collected from 1971 to 1980 in the Hudson River Estuary. Trends observed in annual mean concentrations and the resultant dose implications for man from each source are discussed. The human exposure pathways examined are: fish consumption, water consumption, swimming and recreational use of the shoreline. Based on environmental measurements, a maximum, adult, whole-body, 50-y committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) of 0.79 mu Sv (79 mu rem) is estimated from fish consumption in 1971, the year of maximum reactor discharge of the radiocesiums. For comparison, during the period 1974-79, mean estimates (+/- 1 SD) of the CEDE based on environmental measurements and attributed to other pathways are as follows: consumption of indigenous fish species caught downstream of the reactor outfall, 0.05 +/- 0.02 mu Sv (5 +/- 2 mu rem); consumption of fresh water sampled upstream of the reactors, 0.02 +/- 0.03 mu Sv (2 +/- 3 mu rem); and swimming, 10(-4) +/- 10(-4) mu Sv (0.01 +/- 0.01 mu rem). In addition, external, whole-body exposure resulting from recreational use of the shoreline 1.6 km downstream of the reactors is estimated to be 1.2 X 10(-8) C kg-1 (46 +/- 11 mu R yr-1). The above dose estimates are based on consumption factors of 3.9 and 803 kg y-1 (fish and water, respectively) and on usage factors of 50 and 140 h y-1 (swimming and shoreline recreation, respectively). Differences in dose estimates obtained from these long-term environmental measurements and from assessment models currently recommended for use by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are discussed.
PubMed ID
3744830 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of distribution coefficients and concentration ratios of (90)Sr and (137)Cs in the Techa River and the Miass River.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280846
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jul;158-159:148-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
E A Shishkina
E A Pryakhin
I Ya Popova
D I Osipov
Yu Tikhova
S S Andreyev
I A Shaposhnikova
E A Egoreichenkov
E V Styazhkina
L V Deryabina
G A Tryapitsina
V. Melnikov
G. Rudolfsen
H-C Teien
M K Sneve
A V Akleyev
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jul;158-159:148-63
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Fishes
Gastropoda
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Radiation monitoring
Rivers - chemistry
Russia
Seaweed
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
Empirical data on the behavior of radionuclides in aquatic ecosystems are needed for radioecological modeling, which is commonly used for predicting transfer of radionuclides, estimating doses, and assessing possible adverse effects on species and communities. Preliminary studies of radioecological parameters including distribution coefficients and concentration ratios, for (90)Sr and (137)Cs were not in full agreement with the default values used in the ERICA Tool and the RESRAD BIOTA codes. The unique radiation situation in the Techa River, which was contaminated by long-lived radionuclides ((90)Sr and (137)Cs) in the middle of the last century allows improved knowledge about these parameters for river systems. Therefore, the study was focused on the evaluation of radioecological parameters (distribution coefficients and concentration ratios for (90)Sr and (137)Cs) for the Techa River and the Miass River, which is assumed as a comparison waterbody. To achieve the aim the current contamination of biotic and abiotic components of the river ecosystems was studied; distribution coefficients for (90)Sr and (137)Cs were calculated; concentration ratios of (90)Sr and (137)Cs for three fish species (roach, perch and pike), gastropods and filamentous algae were evaluated. Study results were then compared with default values available for use in the well-known computer codes ERICA Tool and RESRAD BIOTA (when site-specific data are not available). We show that the concentration ratios of (137)Cs in whole fish bodies depend on the predominant type of nutrition (carnivores and phytophagous). The results presented here are useful in the context of improving of tools for assessing concentrations of radionuclides in biota, which could rely on a wider range of ecosystem information compared with the process limited the current versions of ERICA and RESRAD codes. Further, the concentration ratios of (90)Sr are species-specific and strongly dependent on Ca(2+) concentration in water. The universal characteristic allows us to combine the data of fish caught in the water with different mineralization by multiplying the concentration of Ca(2+). The concentration ratios for fishes were well-fitted by Generalized Logistic Distribution function (GLD). In conclusion, the GLD can be used for probabilistic modeling of the concentration ratios in freshwater fishes to improve the confidence in the modeling results. This is important in the context of risk assessment and regulatory.
PubMed ID
27105147 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of factors influencing accumulation of stable Sr and Cs in lake and coastal fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280840
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Aug;160:64-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
L. Konovalenko
C. Bradshaw
E. Andersson
D. Lindqvist
U. Kautsky
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Aug;160:64-79
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Calcium - analysis
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis - metabolism
Electric Conductivity
Fishes - metabolism
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Lakes - analysis
Muscles - chemistry - metabolism
Oceans and Seas
Potassium - analysis
Radiation monitoring
Seawater - analysis
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis - metabolism
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
As a result of nuclear accidents and weapons tests, the radionuclides Cs-137 and Sr-90 are common contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. Concentration ratios (CR) based on concentrations of stable Cs and Sr in biota and media are used for the estimation of transfer of their radioisotopes for radiation dose calculations in environmental and human safety assessments. Available element-specific CRs vary by over an order of magnitude for similar organisms, thus affecting the dose estimates proportionally. The variation could be reduced if they were based on a better understanding of the influence of the underlying data and how that affects accumulation and potential biomagnification of stable Cs and Sr in aquatic organisms. For fish, relationships have been identified between water concentrations of K and CR of Cs-137, and between water concentrations of Ca and CR of Sr-90. This has not been confirmed for stable Cs and Sr in European waters. In this study, we analysed an existing dataset for stable Cs and Sr, as well as K and Ca, in four Swedish lakes and three Baltic Sea coastal areas, in order to understand the behaviour of these elements and their radioisotopes in these ecosystems. We found significant seasonal variations in the water concentrations of Cs, Sr, K and Ca, and in electrical conductivity (EC), especially in the lakes. CR values based on measurements taken at single or few time points may, therefore, be inaccurate or introduce unnecessarily large variation into risk assessments. Instead, we recommend incorporating information about the underlying variation in water concentrations into the CR calculations, for example by using the variation of the mean. The inverse relationships between fish CR(Cs)-[K]water and fish CR(Sr)-[Ca]water, confirmed that stable Cs and Sr follow the same trends as their radioisotopes. Thus, they can be used as proxies when radioisotope data are lacking. EC was also strongly correlated with K and Ca concentrations in the water and could potentially be used as a quick and cost-effective method to estimate water chemistry to obtain less variable CR. We also recommend some simple improvements to data collection that would greatly enhance our ability to understand Cs and Sr uptake by fish.
PubMed ID
27153476 View in PubMed
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Fukushima derived radiocesium in subsistence-consumed northern fur seal and wild celery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276592
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Feb;152:1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Elizabeth Ruedig
Colleen Duncan
Bobette Dickerson
Michael Williams
Thomas Gelatt
Justin Bell
Thomas E Johnson
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Feb;152:1-7
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Angelica - metabolism
Animals
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis - metabolism
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Fukushima Nuclear Accident
Fur Seals - metabolism
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry
Radiation monitoring
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
In July 2014, our investigative team traveled to St. Paul Island, Alaska to measure concentrations of radiocesium in wild-caught food products, primarily northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus). The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident released radiocesium into the atmosphere and into the western Pacific Ocean; other investigators have detected Fukushima-derived radionuclides in a variety of marine products harvested off the western coast of North America. We tested two subsistence-consumed food products from St. Paul Island, Alaska for Fukushima-derived radionuclides: 54 northern fur seal, and nine putchki (wild celery, Angelica lucida) plants. Individual northern fur seal samples were below minimum detectable activity concentrations of (137)Cs and (134)Cs, but when composited, northern fur seal tissues tested positive for trace quantities of both isotopes. Radiocesium was detected at an activity concentration of 37.2 mBq (134)Cs kg(-1) f.w. (95% CI: 35.9-38.5) and 141.2 mBq (137)Cs kg(-1) f.w. (95% CI: 135.5-146.8). The measured isotopic ratio, decay-corrected to the date of harvest, was 0.26 (95% CI: 0.25-0.28). The Fukushima nuclear accident released (134)Cs and (137)Cs in roughly equal quantities, but by the date of harvest in July 2014, this ratio was 0.2774, indicating that this population of seals has been exposed to small quantities of Fukushima-derived radiocesium. Activity concentrations of both (134)Cs and (137)Cs in putchki were below detection limits, even for composited samples. Northern fur seal is known to migrate between coastal Alaska and Japan and the trace (134)Cs in northern fur seal tissue suggests that the population under study had been minimally exposed Fukushima-derived radionuclides. Despite this inference, the radionuclide quantities detected are small and no impact is expected as a result of the measured radiation exposure, either in northern fur seal or human populations consuming this species.
PubMed ID
26630034 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.