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43 records – page 1 of 5.

137Cs concentration among children in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident: Mogilev and Gomel Oblasts, Belarus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35314
Source
Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
W S Watson
Source
Health Phys. 1995 May;68(5):733-5
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Body Burden
Byelarus
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Humans
Power Plants
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects - analysis
Ukraine
Notes
Comment On: Health Phys. 1994 Sep;67(3):272-58056594
Comment In: Health Phys. 1995 Dec;69(6):9877493819
PubMed ID
7730075 View in PubMed
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The accident at Chernobyl and trisomy 21 in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36798
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 Mar;275(2):81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
T. Harjulehto-Mervaala
R. Salonen
T. Aro
L. Saxén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 Mar;275(2):81-6
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21 - radiation effects
Cohort Studies
Down Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Matched-Pair Analysis
Maternal Age
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prevalence
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Trisomy
Ukraine
Abstract
Our objective was to explore whether the radiation fallout in Finland after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in April 1986 led to an increased incidence of trisomy 21. In this geographic and temporal cohort study, the country was divided into three zones according to the amounts of radioactive fallout and internal radiation caused by two cesium isotopes. The 518 cytologically verified cases of trisomy 21 were divided into a control group (conceived before the accident), and a study group of children whose expected dates of birth were in the post-accident years 1987-1988, i.e., pregnancies commenced after May 1986. The cases were also divided into three subgroups according to the zones of radiation. There were no significant differences in prevalence of trisomy 21 between the control and study groups nor between the three zones in spite of the significant differences in the levels of radiation and in the body burden that prevailed throughout the study period. Power estimates showed that in the two zones of lower radiation, an increase of 0.5% in the prevalence would have been detected with a power of 0.85, and in the somewhat smaller zone of the highest radiation, with a power of 0.70. The study lends no further support to the view that the low radiation fallout in western Europe would have been causally associated with trisomy 21.
PubMed ID
1379341 View in PubMed
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Affects of ionizing radiation on T-cell population lymphocyte: a risk factor of irritable bowel syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97544
Source
Toxicol Ind Health. 2010 Jul;26(6):323-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
M R Sheikh Sajjadieh
L V Kuznetsova
V B Bojenko
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Immunology & Allergology, National Medical Academy for Post Graduate Education, Kiev, Ukraine. mohammad_esfahan@yahoo.com
Source
Toxicol Ind Health. 2010 Jul;26(6):323-30
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antigens, CD3 - immunology
CD4-CD8 Ratio
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - radiation effects
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - radiation effects
Case-Control Studies
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Child
Child, Preschool
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Humans
Immunity, Cellular - radiation effects
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - etiology
Lymphocyte Count
Risk factors
T-Lymphocytes - radiation effects
Abstract
Irritable bowel syndrome is observed mostly in Ukrainian children and may be related to adverse health effects as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. The aim of this study was to determine status of T-cell population lymphocytes in children with clinical symptom of irritable bowel syndrome. The test population consisted of 95 participants: 75 rural patients aged 4 to 18 who lived in a contaminated area exposed to natural environmental radiation with clinical symptom of irritable bowel syndrome (categorized in three groups) and 20 healthy urban participants from Kiev aged 5 to 15 as control group. Internal radiation activity has been measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed for T-lymphocytes subset such as T-lymphocytes (CD3(+)), T-helper (CD4(+)) and T-cytotoxic (CD8(+)) and then CD4/CD8 ratio was calculated. Percentage of CD3(+) and CD4(+) in all study groups decreased significantly in comparison to control group (p
PubMed ID
20348276 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the contribution of forest pathways to the radiation exposure of different population groups in the Bryansk region of Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195787
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2000 Dec;39(4):291-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
S V Fesenko
G. Voigt
S I Spiridonov
N I Sanzharova
I A Gontarenko
M. Belli
U. Sansone
Author Affiliation
Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Radioecology, Obninsk.
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2000 Dec;39(4):291-300
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - radiation effects
Agriculture
Animals
Cattle
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Ecosystem
Food Contamination, Radioactive - prevention & control
Fruit - radiation effects
Geography
Humans
Milk
Models, Statistical
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Radioactive Hazard Release
Radiometry
Rural Population
Russia
Time Factors
Trees - radiation effects
Ukraine
Abstract
The experience gained in the aftermath of serious radiation accidents shows that forests are an important source of external and internal exposure of the affected population. This paper presents the results of an assessment of the major radiological consequences for forests of Russia, most heavily contaminated after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) accident. Illustrated in the Novozybkovsky district of the Russian Federation, the significance of different forest exposure pathways is estimated and the doses resulting from forest pathways are compared with the doses from agricultural products. It has been found that the contribution of mushrooms and berries to the internal doses of the population, relative to the doses from agricultural products, varied from 10-15% in 1987 to 40-45% in 1996. The results indicate large differences in internal exposure of members of the "critical groups" and "normal population", increasing with time after deposition. Data are presented that give information on the contribution of forests to the collective doses of inhabitants of the area under consideration. It has been shown that for 10 years after the accident (1987-1996), the contribution of forest products to the collective dose of the rural population living in contaminated forests of the Novozybkovsky district, amounts to about 20% (213 person Sv) of the total collective dose of internal and external exposures. However, a potential impact of these products including the dose from exported products is much higher and might reach 659 person Sv. It has been found that in the long-term after the ChNPP accident, serious attention should be given to forest countermeasures, and restoration strategies should be selected on the basis of a combined analysis of the effectiveness of forest and agricultural countermeasures.
PubMed ID
11200973 View in PubMed
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An ecological analysis of leukemia incidence around the highest 137Cs concentration in Poland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19567
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Sep;12(7):653-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
A. Tukiendorf
Author Affiliation
Technical University, Opole, Poland. antu@po.opole.pl
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Sep;12(7):653-9
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Bayes Theorem
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Markov Chains
Poland - epidemiology
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Ukraine
Abstract
Cancer has long been known to be a hazard of exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the assessment of health effects from exposure to radiation is a matter of considerable controversy. This paper presents results of a retrospective study of leukemia incidence (203-207, ICD-9) around the highest 137Cs pollution in Poland (as an effect of the Czarnobyl disaster and/or military bomb tests). The data relating to all the registered leukemias in males and females originated from the Regional Cancer Registry in Opole. The information on 137Cs concentration rates in Opole province was derived from the state monitoring provided by the Polish Geological Institute in Warsaw. The spatial analysis--based on the random-effects Poisson regression model--was carried out via the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique (Gibbs sampling) using BUGS software. The model incorporated epidemiological data and an ecological covariate--isotope concentrations--and provided a framework for estimating the strength of a dose-response relationship. The differences in incidence levels were quantified by traditional standardized morbidity ratios (SMRs) and presented in thematic maps as well as in combined charts of distance-disease-dose relations. Additionally, to assess spatial disease clustering, a Tango test was adopted. The results of this ecological study suggest that the 137Cs concentrations did not have any negative influence on the exposed population.
PubMed ID
11552713 View in PubMed
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[A retrospective analysis of aborted pregnancy in women engaged in agricultural production in controlled areas of Ukraine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64302
Source
Lik Sprava. 1997 Jul-Aug;(4):40-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Karakashian
V N Chusova
M V Kryzhanovskaia
T R Lepeshkina
T Iu Martynovskaia
S S Glushchenko
L A Gorbatiuk
Source
Lik Sprava. 1997 Jul-Aug;(4):40-2
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology - etiology
Accidents, Radiation
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Fertilizers - adverse effects
Humans
Morbidity - trends
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology - etiology
Pesticides - adverse effects
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Ukraine
Abstract
A retrospective analysis was carried out of failure for a woman to be delivered of a child at the natural time in those female workers engaged in agricultural production in controlled territories of Ukraine (Narodichi and Ovruch districts of Zhytomir Province). Data files were studied of 5371 histories of labor (2440 those before and 2931 after the Chernobyl accident) and 525 records of spontaneous abortion (255 those before and 27 after the ChNPP breakdown). There has been found relationship between the frequency of incomplete pregnancies and density of contamination of soil with cesium-137 in certain settlements.
PubMed ID
9471372 View in PubMed
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[Association of renal carcinoma and the exposure to ionizing radiation after the Chernobyl accident]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18460
Source
Actas Urol Esp. 2003 Feb;27(2):164-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
A. Blanco Espinosa
M. Leva Vallejo
F. Merlo de la Peña
P. Moreno Arcas
J L Carazo Carazo
M J Requena Tapia
Author Affiliation
Servicio de Urología, Hospital Regional Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba.
Source
Actas Urol Esp. 2003 Feb;27(2):164-7
Date
Feb-2003
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Allelic Imbalance
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3 - genetics
DNA, Neoplasm - genetics
English Abstract
Female
Genes, ras
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - diagnosis - etiology - genetics
Nuclear Reactors
Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen - analysis
Spain
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
After the nuclear accident of Chernobyl, in the population of zones contaminated the malignant renal tumors was increased from 4.7 to 7.5 per 100,000 of total population. Cesium 137 (137Cs) constitutes 80-90% of the internal exposure of these people as well as eliminated through kidneys becomes an important risk factor. We present a case of a patient, residing in radiocontamined area, who consulted for abdominal pain and left flank mass. We review relevant literature and the management of these patients.
PubMed ID
12731334 View in PubMed
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43 records – page 1 of 5.