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928 records – page 1 of 93.

[Abdominal pregnancy with a living infant]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59724
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 27;153(22):1593-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-27-1991
Author
K. Brasso
K V Strøm
Author Affiliation
Amtssygehuset i Roskilde, gynaekologisk-obstetrisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 27;153(22):1593-4
Date
May-27-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adult
Cesarean Section
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, Ectopic - diagnosis
Abstract
Abdominal pregnancy resulting in a liveborn infant is an obstetric rarity in Denmark. A case is reported and four cases reported during the past 20 years are reviewed. In the present case, the diagnosis of extrauterine pregnancy was not established in advance. The infant, a full-term boy weighing 3,650 g, was delivered transplacentally by Caesarean section during epidural analgesia. The placenta was adherent to the intestines and was left in the abdomen for spontaneous resorption but was expelled gradually through an amnio-percutaneous fistula over a period of three months. The infant did not present any evidence of congenital abnormalities.
PubMed ID
2058022 View in PubMed
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Abnormal bleeding associated with preeclampsia: a population study of 315,085 pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90728
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(2):154-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Eskild Anne
Vatten Lars J
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Akershus University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(2):154-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesarean Section
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Humans
Parity
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology
Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Uterine Hemorrhage - complications
Abstract
ObjeCTIVE: To study the association of preeclampsia with abnormal bleeding in the first trimester and after delivery. DESIGN: Register-based population study. Setting. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Population. A total of 315,085 women in Norway with singleton deliveries after 21 weeks of gestation (1999-2004). METHODS: We compared frequencies of vaginal bleeding in the first trimester between women who subsequently developed preeclampsia and women without preeclampsia development, and made similar comparisons for postpartum bleeding. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of women with bleeding. RESULTS: In the first trimester, vaginal bleeding occurred in 1.6% (215/13,166) of subsequent preeclampsia cases, compared to 2.0% (6,112/301,919) of normotensives (p1,500 mL) occurred in 3.0% (399/13,166) of preeclampsia cases and in 1.4% (4,223/301,919) of normotensives (p500 mL) was also more common in preeclampsia cases (22.9% versus 13.9%, p
PubMed ID
19093234 View in PubMed
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Abnormally invasive placenta-prevalence, risk factors and antenatal suspicion: results from a large population-based pregnancy cohort study in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294473
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jul; 123(8):1348-55
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Date
Jul-2016
Author
L Thurn
P G Lindqvist
M Jakobsson
L B Colmorn
K Klungsoyr
R I Bjarnadóttir
A M Tapper
P E Børdahl
K Gottvall
K B Petersen
L Krebs
M Gissler
J Langhoff-Roos
K Källen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Blekinge Hospital, Karlskrona, Sweden.
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jul; 123(8):1348-55
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Video-Audio Media
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hysterectomy - statistics & numerical data
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Peripartum Period
Placenta Accreta - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Postpartum Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Ultrasonography
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Uterine Rupture - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective was to investigate prevalence, estimate risk factors, and antenatal suspicion of abnormally invasive placenta (AIP) associated with laparotomy in women in the Nordic countries.
Population-based cohort study.
A 3-year Nordic collaboration among obstetricians to identify and report on uterine rupture, peripartum hysterectomy, excessive blood loss, and AIP from 2009 to 2012 The Nordic Obstetric Surveillance Study (NOSS).
In the NOSS study, clinicians reported AIP cases from maternity wards and the data were validated against National health registries.
Prevalence, risk factors, antenatal suspicion, birth complications, and risk estimations using aggregated national data.
A total of 205 cases of AIP in association with laparotomy were identified, representing 3.4 per 10 000 deliveries. The single most important risk factor, which was reported in 49% of all cases of AIP, was placenta praevia. The risk of AIP increased seven-fold after one prior caesarean section (CS) to 56-fold after three or more CS. Prior postpartum haemorrhage was associated with six-fold increased risk of AIP (95% confidence interval 3.7-10.9). Approximately 70% of all cases were not diagnosed antepartum. Of these, 39% had prior CS and 33% had placenta praevia.
Our findings indicate that a lower CS rate in the population may be the most effective way to lower the incidence of AIP. Focused ultrasound assessment of women at high risk will likely strengthen antenatal suspicion. Prior PPH is a novel risk factor associated with an increased prevalence of AIP.
An ultrasound assessment in women with placenta praevia or prior CS may double the awareness for AIP.
Notes
CommentIn: BJOG. 2016 May;123(6):1032 PMID 27101265
CommentIn: BJOG. 2016 May;123(6):1031-2 PMID 27101264
CommentIn: BJOG. 2017 Jan;124(1):164-165 PMID 28009121
PubMed ID
26227006 View in PubMed
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Acta sixty years ago. Vaginal cesarean section in cases of placenta previa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65117
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1991;70(3):181-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991

Acute uterine inversion: a review of 40 cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187508
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2002 Dec;24(12):953-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Thomas F Baskett
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Dalhousie University, Halifax NS.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2002 Dec;24(12):953-6
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Transfusion
Cesarean Section
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Postpartum Hemorrhage - epidemiology - therapy
Pregnancy
Recurrence
Risk factors
Uterine Inversion - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To determine the incidence, complications, and risk of recurrence of acute uterine inversion.
A retrospective chart review was conducted of all cases of acute uterine inversion recorded at the Grace Maternity Hospital in Halifax, Nova Scotia, from 1977 to 2000.
During the 24-year period studied, 40 cases of acute uterine inversion occurred following 125,081 births. The incidence of acute uterine inversion following vaginal birth was 1 in 3737, and following Caesarean section, 1 in 1860. Post-partum hemorrhage complicated 65% of cases of acute uterine inversion, and 47.5% required blood transfusion. There was no recurrence in 26 subsequent deliveries. Following the institution of active management of the third stage of labour in 1988, the incidence of acute uterine inversion following vaginal delivery fell 4.4-fold.
Acute uterine inversion is rare but accompanied by high risk of postpartum hemorrhage and the need for blood transfusion. Active management of the third stage of labour may reduce the incidence of uterine inversion.
PubMed ID
12464994 View in PubMed
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Adherence to guidelines and suboptimal practice in term breech delivery with perinatal death- a population-based case-control study in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309107
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Sep 09; 19(1):330
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-09-2019
Author
Solveig Bjellmo
Sissel Hjelle
Lone Krebs
Elisabeth Magnussen
Torstein Vik
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, More and Romsdal Hospital Trust, Postbox 1600, 6026, Aalesund, Norway. solveigbjellmo@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Sep 09; 19(1):330
Date
Sep-09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Breech Presentation
Case-Control Studies
Cesarean Section - methods - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, Obstetric - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Needs Assessment
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - surgery
Perinatal Death - prevention & control
Perinatal mortality
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Care - methods - standards
Quality Improvement
Abstract
In a recent population-based study we reported excess risk of neonatal mortality associated with vaginal breech delivery. In this case-control study we examine whether deviations from Norwegian guidelines are more common in breech deliveries resulting in intrapartum or neonatal deaths than in breech deliveries where the offspring survives, and if these deaths are potentially avoidable.
Case-control study completed as a perinatal audit including term breech deliveries of singleton without congenital anomalies in Norway from 1999 to 2015. Deliveries where the child died intrapartum or in the neonatal period were case deliveries. For each case, two control deliveries who survived were identified. All the included deliveries were reviewed by four obstetricians independently assessing if the deaths in the case group might have been avoided and if the management of the deviations from Norwegian guidelines were more common in case than in control deliveries.
Thirty-one case and 62 control deliveries were identified by the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. After exclusion of non-eligible deliveries, 22 case and 31 control deliveries were studied. Three case and two control deliveries were unplanned home deliveries, while all in-hospital deliveries were in line with national guidelines. Antenatal care and/or management of in-hospital deliveries was assessed as suboptimal in seven (37%) case and two (7%) control deliveries (p?=?0.020). Three case deliveries were completed as planned caesarean delivery and 12 (75%) of the remaining 16 deaths were considered potentially avoidable had planned caesarean delivery been done. In seven of these 16 deliveries, death was associated with cord prolapse or difficult delivery of the head.
All in-hospital breech deliveries were in line with Norwegian guidelines. Seven of twelve potentially avoidable deaths were associated with birth complications related to breech presentation. However, suboptimal care was more common in case than control deliveries. Further improvement of intrapartum care may be obtained through continuous rigorous training and feedback from repeated perinatal audits.
PubMed ID
31500581 View in PubMed
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Adherence to guidelines on the management of dystocia and cesarean section rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163725
Source
Am J Perinatol. 2007 May;24(5):271-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Lawrence W Oppenheimer
Paul Holmes
Qiuying Yang
Tubao Yang
Mark Walker
Shi Wu Wen
Author Affiliation
Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Perinatol. 2007 May;24(5):271-5
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cesarean Section - standards - utilization
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Dystocia - prevention & control
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Obstetrics
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Societies, Medical
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada (SOGC) guidelines on dystocia are being followed, and whether adherence to the guidelines is related to cesarean section rates. Data were extracted from a maternity database for nulliparous women with singleton, cephalic pregnancies at 37 or more completed weeks of gestation for a 4-year period. Patients delivered by elective cesarean section were excluded. Data were examined to determine whether those who had a cesarean section for dystocia in the first stage of labor fulfilled SOGC guidelines. In addition, the obstetricians were divided into two groups (high or low) according to their cesarean section rate for dystocia to determine whether a higher section rate was associated with an increased guideline violation rate. There were 239 nulliparous women who had a cesarean section for dystocia in the first stage of labor. The guidelines were followed in 47.7% of spontaneous labors and 77.5% of inductions. The mean section rate for dystocia in the first stage of labor was 10.8% in the high group and 6.6% in the low group, and the incidence of guideline violations in these groups was 48.0% and 39.6%, respectively ( P = 0.07). The study had a power of 0.88 to detect a 40% difference in guideline violation rates between the two groups. We conclude that many women have cesarean section for dystocia performed without fulfilling SOGC guidelines.
PubMed ID
17484079 View in PubMed
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Adolescent pregnancy outcomes in the province of Ontario: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115757
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Mar;35(3):234-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Nathalie Fleming
Natalia Ng
Christine Osborne
Shawna Biederman
Abdool Shafaaz Yasseen
Jessica Dy
Ruth Rennicks White
Mark Walker
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Newborn Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Mar;35(3):234-45
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analgesia, Epidural - statistics & numerical data
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Extraction, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Prenatal Care - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Few Canadian studies have examined the association between adolescent pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this cohort study was to characterize the association between adolescent pregnancy and specific adverse maternal, obstetrical, and neonatal outcomes, as well as maternal health behaviours.
We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study of all singleton births in Ontario between January 2006 and December 2010, using the Better Outcomes Registry and Network database. Outcomes for pregnant women
PubMed ID
23470111 View in PubMed
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Adoption of diagnostic technology and variation in caesarean section rates: a test of the practice style hypothesis in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124304
Source
Health Serv Res. 2012 Dec;47(6):2169-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Jostein Grytten
Lars Monkerud
Rune Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Section of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo and Akershus University Hospital, Blindern, Oslo, Norway. josteing@odont.uio.no
Source
Health Serv Res. 2012 Dec;47(6):2169-89
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiotocography
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data - trends
Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Electrocardiography
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Pregnancy
Ultrasonography
Uncertainty
Abstract
To examine whether the introduction of advanced diagnostic technology in maternity care has led to less variation in type of delivery between hospitals in Norway.
The Medical Birth Registry of Norway provided detailed medical information for 1.7 million deliveries from 1967 to 2005. Information about diagnostic technology was collected directly from the maternity units.
The data were analyzed using a two-level binary logistic model with Caesarean section as the outcome measure. Level one contained variables that characterized the health status of the mother and child. Hospitals are level two. A heterogeneous variance structure was specified for the hospital level, where the error variance was allowed to vary according to the following types of diagnostic technology: two-dimensional ultrasound, cardiotocography, ST waveform analysis, and fetal blood analyses.
There was a marked variation in Caesarean section rates between hospitals up to 1973. After this the variation diminished markedly. This was due to the introduction of ultrasound and cardiotocography.
Diagnostic technology reduced clinical uncertainty about the diagnosis of risk factors of the mother and child during delivery, and variation in type of delivery between hospitals was reduced accordingly. The results support the practice style hypothesis.
PubMed ID
22594486 View in PubMed
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Advanced maternal age and the outcomes of preterm neonates: a social paradox?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131136
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Oct;118(4):872-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Jaideep Kanungo
Andrew James
Douglas McMillan
Abhay Lodha
Daniel Faucher
Shoo K Lee
Prakesh S Shah
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Oct;118(4):872-7
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Chorioamnionitis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, newborn, diseases - epidemiology
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Steroids - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the effect of maternal age on survival free of major morbidity among preterm newborns younger than 33 weeks of gestation at birth.
Data from a retrospective cohort of preterm newborns younger than 33 weeks of gestation admitted to Canadian neonatal intensive care units between 2003 and 2008 were analyzed. The primary outcome was survival without major morbidity (defined as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage grade 3 or 4, periventricular leukomalacia, retinopathy of prematurity stage 3, 4 or 5, or necrotizing enterocolitis stage 2 or 3). Trends in outcomes in relation to maternal age groups were examined using a multivariable analysis that controlled for confounders.
Baseline comparison for the 12,326 eligible newborns revealed no differences in sex, small-for-gestational-age status, and chorioamnionitis among different maternal age groups. Higher rates of cesarean delivery, use of prenatal steroids, maternal hypertension, and diabetes were noted as maternal age increased (P
PubMed ID
21934451 View in PubMed
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928 records – page 1 of 93.