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164 records – page 1 of 17.

The ability to reproduce the neutral zero position of the head.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50943
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1999 Jan;22(1):26-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
H W Christensen
N. Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Nordic Institute of Chiropractic & Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark.
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1999 Jan;22(1):26-8
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Vertebrae - physiology
Chiropractic - instrumentation
Female
Head
Humans
Male
Posture - physiology
Range of Motion, Articular
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rotation
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine how precisely asymptomatic subjects can reproduce a neutral zero position of the head. STUDY DESIGN: Repeated measures of the active cervical neutral zero position. SETTING: Institute of Medical Biology (Center of Biomechanics) at Odense University. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-eight asymptomatic students from the University of Odense, male/female ratio 20:18 and mean age 24.3 years (range, 20 to 30 years). INTERVENTION: Measurements of the location of the neutral zero head position by use of the electrogoniometer CA-6000 Spine Motion Analyzer. Each subject's neutral zero position with eyes closed was measured 3 times. The device gives the localization of the neutral zero as coordinates in 3 dimensions (x, v, z) corresponding to the 3 motion planes. RESULTS: The mean difference from neutral zero in 3 motion planes was found to be 2.7 degrees in the sagittal plane, 1.0 degree in the horizontal plane, and 0.65 degree in the frontal plane. CONCLUSION: We found that young adult asymptomatic subjects are very good at reproducing the neutral zero position of the head. This suggests the existence of some advanced neurologic control mechanisms.
PubMed ID
10029946 View in PubMed
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Adolescent disc degeneration--no headache association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165736
Source
Cephalalgia. 2007 Jan;27(1):14-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
K. Laimi
M. Erkintalo
L. Metsähonkala
T. Vahlberg
M. Mikkelsson
P. Sonninen
R. Parkkola
M. Aromaa
M. Sillanpäa
P. Rautava
P. Anttila
J. Salminen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Finland. klaimi@utu.fi
Source
Cephalalgia. 2007 Jan;27(1):14-21
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cervical Vertebrae - pathology
Child
Comorbidity
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Headache - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Intervertebral Disc Displacement - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Neck Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine whether adolescents with headache have more disc degeneration in the cervical spine than headache-free controls. This study is part of a population-based follow-up study of adolescents with and without headache. At the age of 17 years, adolescents with headache at least three times a month (N = 47) and adolescents with no headache (N = 22) participated in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the cervical spine. Of the 47 headache sufferers, 17 also had weekly neck pain and 30 had neck pain less than once a month. MRI scans were interpreted independently by three neuroradiologists. Disc degeneration was found in 67% of participants, with no difference between adolescents with and without headache. Most of the degenerative changes were located in the lower cervical spine. In adolescence, mild degenerative changes of the cervical spine are surprisingly common but do not contribute to headache.
PubMed ID
17212678 View in PubMed
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Alarming rise in the number and incidence of fall-induced cervical spine injuries among older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164818
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2007 Feb;62(2):180-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Pekka Kannus
Mika Palvanen
Seppo Niemi
Jari Parkkari
Author Affiliation
Accident & Trauma Research Center, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, P.O. Box 30, FIN-33501 Tampere, Finland. pekka.kannus@uta.fi
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2007 Feb;62(2):180-3
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cervical Vertebrae - injuries
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Although fall-induced injuries among older adults are said to be a major public health concern in modern societies with aging populations, reliable epidemiologic information on their secular trends is limited.
We determined the current trend in the number and incidence (per 100,000 persons) of fall-induced severe cervical spine injuries (fracture, cord injury, or both) of older adults in Finland, a European Union country with a well-defined white population of 5.2 million, by taking into account all persons aged 50 years or older who were admitted to all Finnish hospitals for primary treatment of such injury in 1970-2004. Similar patients aged 20-49 years served as a reference group.
The number and raw incidence of fall-induced cervical spine injury among Finns aged 50 years or older rose considerably between the years 1970 and 2004, from 59 (number) and 5.2 (incidence) in 1970 to 228 and 12.0 in 2004. The relative increases were 286% and 131%, respectively. Throughout the study period, the age-standardized incidence of injury was higher in men than women, and showed a clear increase in both sexes in 1970-2004 from 8.5 to 17.4 in men (105% increase), and from 2.8 to 6.4 in women (129% increase). A similar finding was observed in the age-specific incidences of the study group. In the reference group, the annual number and incidence of injury decreased slightly over time. Assuming that the observed increase in the age-standardized or age-specific injury incidence continues in Finns aged 50 years or older and the size of this population increases as predicted, the annual number of fall-induced cervical spine injuries in this population will be about 100% higher in the year 2030 (about 400 injuries annually) than it was during 2000-2004 (about 200 injuries annually).
In Finnish persons aged 50 years or older, the number of fall-induced severe cervical spine injuries seems to show an alarming rise with a rate that cannot be explained merely by demographic changes. The finding underscores an increasing influence of falls on health and well-being of our older adults; therefore, wide-scale fall-prevention measures should be urgently adopted to control this development.
PubMed ID
17339643 View in PubMed
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Analysis of demographics, risk factors, clinical presentation, and surgical treatment modalities for the ossified posterior longitudinal ligament.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136625
Source
Neurosurg Focus. 2011 Mar;30(3):E11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Samuel Kalb
Nikolay L Martirosyan
Luis Perez-Orribo
M Yashar S Kalani
Nicholas Theodore
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurological Surgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, 350 W. Thomas Road, Phoenix, AZ 85013, USA.
Source
Neurosurg Focus. 2011 Mar;30(3):E11
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cervical Vertebrae - radiography - surgery
Diagnosis, Differential
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Ligaments - radiography - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Orthopedic Procedures - methods
Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament - diagnosis - ethnology - surgery
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is a rare disease that results in progressive myeloradiculopathy related to pathological ossification of the ligament from unknown causes. Although it has long been considered a disease of Asian origin, this disorder is increasingly being recognized in European and North American populations. Herein the authors present demographic, radiographic, and comorbidity data from white patients with diagnosed OPLL as well as the outcomes of surgically treated patients.
Between 1999 and 2010, OPLL was diagnosed in 36 white patients at Barrow Neurological Institute. Patients were divided into 2 groups: a group of 33 patients with cervical OPLL and a group of 3 patients with thoracic or lumbar OPLL. Fifteen of these patients who had received operative treatment were analyzed separately. Imaging analysis focused on signal changes in the spinal cord, mass occupying ratio, signs of dural penetration, spinal levels involved, and subtype of OPLL. Surgical techniques included anterior cervical decompression and fusion with corpectomy, posterior laminectomy with fusion, posterior open-door laminoplasty, and anterior corpectomy combined with posterior laminectomy and fusion. Comorbidities, cigarette smoking, and previous spine surgeries were considered. Neurological function was assessed using a modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association Scale (mJOAS).
A high-intensity signal on T2-weighted MR imaging and a history of cervical spine surgery correlated with worse mJOAS scores. Furthermore, mJOAS scores decreased as the occupying rate of the OPLL mass in the spinal canal increased. On radiographic analysis, the proportion of signs of dural penetration correlated with the OPLL subtype. A high mass occupying ratio of the OPLL was directly associated with the presence of dural penetration and high-intensity signal. In the surgical group, the rate of neurological improvement associated with an anterior approach was 58% compared with 31% for a posterior laminectomy. No complications were associated with any of the 4 types of surgical procedures. In 3 cases, symptoms had worsened at the last follow-up, with only a single case of disease progression. Laminoplasty was the only technique associated with a worse clinical outcome. There were no statistical differences (p > 0.05) between the type of surgical procedure or radiographic presentation and postoperative outcome. There was also no difference between the choice of surgical procedure performed and the number of spinal levels involved with OPLL.
Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament can no longer be viewed as a disease of the Asian population exclusively. Since OPLL among white populations is being diagnosed more frequently, surgeons must be aware of the most appropriate surgical option. The outcomes of the various surgical treatments among the different populations with OPLL appear similar. Compared with other procedures, however, anterior decompression led to the best neurological outcomes.
PubMed ID
21361749 View in PubMed
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An assessment of the risk of developing hyperparathyroidism and thyroid disorders subsequent to neck irradiation in middle-aged women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14625
Source
J Surg Oncol. 1985 Jun;29(2):78-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1985
Author
I. Hedman
M. Fjälling
S. Lindberg
L M Lundberg
L E Tisell
Source
J Surg Oncol. 1985 Jun;29(2):78-81
Date
Jun-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Calcium - blood
Cervical Vertebrae
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism - blood - etiology
Middle Aged
Neck
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Radiotherapy Dosage
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Spinal Osteophytosis - radiotherapy
Sweden
Thyroid Diseases - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
We investigated the occurrence of thyroid and parathyroid disorders in 100 women (age 66-70 years) irradiated for cervical spondylosis on average 25 years previously and in 100 control women of similar age. Hyperparathyroidism (HPT), proven by operation, was diagnosed in one patient of each group, and three additional cases were diagnosed biochemically among irradiated women. The difference in incidence is not significant. Nor was there any significant difference in incidence of thyroid disorders. No thyroid carcinoma was found in either group. Even if there is a moderate increase of HPT after neck irradiation in middle-aged women the risk is not so great as to warrant organised follow-up.
PubMed ID
4079389 View in PubMed
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Assessment of autonomic function after acute spinal cord injury using heart rate variability analyses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265934
Source
Spinal Cord. 2015 Jan;53(1):54-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
L. Malmqvist
T. Biering-Sørensen
K. Bartholdy
A. Krassioukov
K-L Welling
J H Svendsen
A. Kruse
B. Hansen
F. Biering-Sørensen
Source
Spinal Cord. 2015 Jan;53(1):54-8
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Autonomic Nervous System Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Cervical Vertebrae - pathology
Denmark
Female
Fourier Analysis
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Linear Models
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Spinal Cord Injuries - classification - complications
Thoracic Vertebrae - pathology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in severe dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. C1-C8 SCI affects the supraspinal control to the heart, T1-T5 SCI affects the spinal sympathetic outflow to the heart, and T6-T12 SCI leaves sympathetic control to the heart intact. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis can serve as a surrogate measure of autonomic regulation. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in HRV patterns and alterations in patients with acute traumatic SCI.
As soon as possible after SCI patients who met the inclusion criteria had 24?h Holter monitoring of their cardiac rhythm, additional Holter monitoring were performed 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after SCI.
Fifty SCI patients were included. A significant increase in standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal (SDANN) sinus intervals was seen in the first month after injury (P=0.008). The increase was only significant in C1-T5 incomplete patients and in patients who did not experience one or more episodes of cardiac arrest. Significant lower values of Low Frequency Power, Total Power and the Low Frequency over High Frequency ratio were seen in the C1-T5 SCI patients compared with T6-T12 SCI patients.
The rise in SDANN in the incomplete C1-T5 patients could be due to spontaneous functional recovery caused by synaptic plasticity or remodelling of damaged axons. That the autonomic nervous system function differs between C1-C8, T1-T5 and T6-T12 patients suggest that the sympathovagal balance in both the C1-C8 and T1-T5 SCI patients has yet to be reached.
PubMed ID
25403499 View in PubMed
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Association of myelopathy scores with cervical sagittal balance and normalized spinal cord volume: analysis of 56 preoperative cases from the AOSpine North America Myelopathy study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107913
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013 Oct 15;38(22 Suppl 1):S161-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2013
Author
Justin S Smith
Virginie Lafage
Devon J Ryan
Christopher I Shaffrey
Frank J Schwab
Alpesh A Patel
Darrel S Brodke
Paul M Arnold
K Daniel Riew
Vincent C Traynelis
Kris Radcliff
Alexander R Vaccaro
Michael G Fehlings
Christopher P Ames
Author Affiliation
*Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville †Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York ‡Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL §Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City ¶Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kansas, Kansas City ?Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Washington University, St Louis, MO **Department of Neurosurgery, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, IL ††Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA ‡‡Division of Neurosurgery and Spinal Program, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and §§Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco.
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013 Oct 15;38(22 Suppl 1):S161-70
Date
Oct-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cervical Vertebrae - radiography - surgery
Female
Humans
Kyphosis - radiography - surgery
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Preoperative Period
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Spinal Cord - radiography - surgery
Spinal Cord Diseases - radiography - surgery
Spondylosis - radiography - surgery
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Post hoc analysis of prospectively collected data.
Development of methods to determine in vivo spinal cord dimensions and application to correlate preoperative alignment, myelopathy, and health-related quality-of-life scores in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM).
CSM is the leading cause of spinal cord dysfunction. The association between cervical alignment, sagittal balance, and myelopathy has not been well characterized.
This was a post hoc analysis of the prospective, multicenter AOSpine North America CSM study. Inclusion criteria for this study required preoperative cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neutral sagittal cervical radiography. Techniques for MRI assessment of spinal cord dimensions were developed. Correlations between imaging and health-related quality-of-life scores were assessed.
Fifty-six patients met inclusion criteria (mean age = 55.4 yr). The modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (mJOA) scores correlated with C2-C7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA) (r = -0.282, P = 0.035). Spinal cord volume correlated with cord length (r = 0.472, P
PubMed ID
23963001 View in PubMed
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Association of neck pain, disability and neck pain during maximal effort with neck muscle strength and range of movement in women with chronic non-specific neck pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178716
Source
Eur J Pain. 2004 Oct;8(5):473-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Jari Ylinen
Esa-Pekka Takala
Hannu Kautiainen
Matti Nykänen
Arja Häkkinen
Timo Pohjolainen
Sirkka-Liisa Karppi
Olavi Airaksinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Jyväskylä Central Hospital, Keskussairaalantie 19, 40620 Jyväskylä, Finland. jari.ylinen@ksshp.fi
Source
Eur J Pain. 2004 Oct;8(5):473-8
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Vertebrae - physiology
Chronic Disease
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Head Movements - physiology
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle Weakness - etiology - physiopathology
Neck Muscles - physiopathology
Neck Pain - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases
Pain Threshold - physiology
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Stress, mechanical
Torque
Weight-Bearing
Abstract
Several studies have reported lower neck muscle strength in patients with chronic neck pain compared to healthy controls. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between the severity of neck pain and disability with neck strength and range of movement in women suffering from chronic neck pain. One hundred and seventy-nine female office workers with chronic neck pain were selected to the study. The outcome was assessed by the self-rating questionnaires on neck pain (visual analogue scale, Vernon's disability index, Neck pain and disability index) and by measures of the passive range of movement (ROM) and maximal isometric neck muscle strength. No statistically significant correlation was found between perceived neck pain and the disability indices and the maximal isometric neck strength and ROM measures. However, the pain values reported during the strength tests were inversely correlated with the results of strength tests (r=-0.24 to -0.46), showing that pain was associated with decreased force production. About two-thirds of the patients felt pain during test efforts. Pain may prevent full effort during strength tests and hence the production of maximal force. Thus in patients with chronic neck pain the results do not always describe true maximal strength, but rather the patients' ability to bear strain, which may be considerably influenced by their painful condition. The results of the present study suggest that rehabilitation in cases of chronic neck pain should aim at raising tolerance to mechanical strain.
PubMed ID
15324778 View in PubMed
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Axis fractures resulting from motor vehicle accidents. The need for occupant restraints.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236331
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1986 Nov;11(9):861-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1986
Author
M N Hadley
V K Sonntag
T W Grahm
R. Masferrer
C. Browner
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1986 Nov;11(9):861-4
Date
Nov-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Axis - injuries - pathology
Cervical Vertebrae - injuries
Child
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Fractures, Bone - etiology - mortality - pathology - prevention & control
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Seat Belts
Abstract
A total of 625 patients who sustained acute cervical spine fractures were evaluated by the Spinal Cord Injury Service at Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona, between January 1976 and January 1984. Of them, 107 had fractures of the second cervical vertebra. In a retrospective review, motor vehicle accidents were found to be the most common mechanism of injury, resulting in 73 (68%) of the 107 axis fractures. All axis fracture types were encountered in this subgroup: hangman's (27%), Odontoid Type II (39%), Odontoid Type III (15%), and miscellaneous fractures (19%). Only one of the 30 patients with complete medical records and detailed information about the accident was wearing a seat belt. Equally remarkable is that 15 of the 30 accidents were single car mishaps, where occupant restraints might theoretically provide the most protection. Sixteen of the 30 patients were thrown from their vehicles, another five were found in the backseat, which leads to the conclusion that a significant of the driving population does not wear seat belts or shoulder restraints. Patients with axis fractures from an automobile accident had a high rate of associated severe head injuries or other cervical spine fractures, three times that of patients with C-2 fractures from other causes. Motorists who are thrown from their vehicles suffer the most severe trauma and have the highest rates of morbidity and mortality. As many as 25% to 40% of individuals who sustain high cervical fractures in motor vehicle accidents die as a result of their injuries.
PubMed ID
3824060 View in PubMed
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C2 Fracture Subtypes, Incidence, and Treatment Allocation Change with Age: A Retrospective Cohort Study of 233 Consecutive Cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280143
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2017;2017:8321680
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Anna-Lena Robinson
Anders Möller
Yohan Robinson
Claes Olerud
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2017;2017:8321680
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cervical Vertebrae - physiopathology - surgery
Female
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Spinal Fractures - classification - physiopathology - surgery
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The currently available data on the distribution of C2 fracture subtypes is sparse. This study was designed to identify the proportions of the second cervical vertebra (C2) fracture subtypes and to present age and gender specific incidences of subgroups. A dataset of all patients treated between 2002 and 2014 for C2 fractures was extracted from the regional hospital information system. C2 fractures were classified into odontoid fractures types 1, 2, and 3, Hangman's fractures types 1, 2, and 3, and atypical C2 fractures. 233 patients (female 51%, age 72 ± 19 years) were treated for a C2 fracture. Odontoid fractures were found in 183 patients, of which 2 were type 1, 127 type 2, and 54 type 3, while 26 of C2 fractures were Hangman's fractures and 24 were atypical C2 fractures. In the geriatric subgroup 89% of all C2 fractures were odontoid, of which 71% were type 2 and 29% type 3. There was an increasing incidence of odontoid fractures types 2 and 3 from 2002 to 2014. 40% of C2 fractures were treated surgically. This study presents reliable subset proportions of C2 fractures in a prospectively collected regional cohort. Knowledge of these proportions facilitates future epidemiological studies of C2 fractures.
PubMed ID
28182084 View in PubMed
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164 records – page 1 of 17.