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Accuracy and false-positive rate of the cytologic diagnosis of follicular cervicitis: observations from the College of American Pathologists Pap Educational Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112651
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Jul;137(7):907-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Manon Auger
Walid Khalbuss
Ritu Nayar
Chengquan Zhao
Patricia Wasserman
Rhona Souers
Nicole Thomas
Ann T Moriarty
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, McGill University and McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B4, Canada.
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Jul;137(7):907-11
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Papanicolaou test
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Societies, Medical
United States - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Uterine Cervicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vaginal Smears - methods - standards
Abstract
Follicular cervicitis is usually easily identifiable on Papanicolaou (Pap) tests; however, historically, follicular cervicitis is reported to lead to false-positive diagnoses of epithelial cell abnormalities.
To assess participant responses in the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Pap educational program (CAP-PAP) to determine the accuracy and false-positive rate of follicular cervicitis cases. Design.-We performed a retrospective review of 4914 participant responses for gynecologic cytology challenges with the reference diagnosis of follicular cervicitis during 11 years (2000-2010) from CAP-PAP. Reference diagnosis category, false-positive rates by participant type (laboratory, cytotechnologist, pathologist), and preparation type (conventional smears, ThinPrep) were analyzed.
Of the total 4914 general category responses, 4368 (88.9%) were benign while 546 (11.1%) responses were epithelial cell abnormalities (false positives). Of benign responses, only 2026 (46.4%) were an exact match to follicular cervicitis. Adenocarcinoma and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were the most common diagnoses chosen as a false-positive interpretation (42.3% and 20.1%, respectively). Participant type was significantly associated with false-positive interpretations (laboratory: 19.2%; cytotechnologist: 11.1%; pathologist: 7.9%; P
PubMed ID
23808462 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of HPV testing of vaginal smear obtained with a novel self-sampling device.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79114
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Stenvall Harriet
Wikström Ingrid
Backlund Ingrid
Wilander Erik
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, University Hospital of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(1):16-21
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control - virology
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Predictive value of tests
Self Care
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control - virology
Vaginal Smears - instrumentation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most of women diagnosed as having cervical cancer have not participated in organized cytological screening. Aim. A study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of human papilloma virus testing by self-collected vaginal samples in comparison to regular cytological screening. The agreement of hybrid capture 2 assay and polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of human papilloma virus DNA in self-collected vaginal samples and clinician-obtained cervical smears was investigated. METHOD: Forty-three women aged 23-58 years admitted for further examination due to previous positive cytology in the organized screening participated in self-collecting of vaginal samples with a novel self-sampling device. During the visit a clinician also collected a cervical smear using a cytobrush. The vaginal samples collected with the self-sampling device were analyzed for high-risk human papilloma virus with the hybrid capture 2 assay technique and the cervical smears were Pap-stained, examined cytologically and after that reanalyzed for human papilloma virus DNA using a polymerase chain reaction assay. RESULT: The vaginal samples were positive for high-risk human papilloma virus in 37% of the cases using hybrid capture 2 assay. Twelve of the 43 Pap smears showed positive cytology (ASCUS-CIN 3), of which 4 showed CIN 2-3. When polymerase chain reaction assay was performed, human papilloma virus DNA was detected in 40% of the glass slides. The agreement between cytology and the two human papilloma virus testing techniques was 67-74% (kappa 0.27-0.45) and the agreement between the two human papilloma virus tests was 70% (kappa 0.36). CONCLUSION: Testing for high-risk human papilloma virus can identify more women at risk of developing cervical cancer than cytology irrespective of the sampling method. Furthermore, offering a self-sampling device for collection of vaginal smear seems to be a useful screening tool for cervical cancer among women not responding to an invitation for smear sampling.
PubMed ID
17230283 View in PubMed
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Bacterial vaginosis and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23575
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Aug;73(7):586-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
J J Platz-Christensen
E. Sundström
P G Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Aug;73(7):586-8
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Mass Screening
Papillomavirus, Human - isolation & purification
Papovaviridae Infections - complications - microbiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Virus Infections - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Vaginal Smears
Vaginosis, Bacterial - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
METHODS. In an attempt to investigate an association between the finding of clue cells in Papanicolaou-stained (PAP) smears and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), a total of 6150 smears from 1976 were re-investigated. RESULTS. Clue cells representing bacterial vaginosis were present in 10% of the PAP-smears. CIN II and III alone, as well as all CIN cases, were more common in women with bacterial vaginosis (p
PubMed ID
8079612 View in PubMed
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Cervical cancer screening programme in Finland with an example on implementing alternative screening methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162745
Source
Coll Antropol. 2007 Apr;31 Suppl 2:17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Ahti Anttila
Pekka Nieminen
Author Affiliation
Mass Screening Registry, Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki, Finland. ahti.anttila@cancer.fi
Source
Coll Antropol. 2007 Apr;31 Suppl 2:17-22
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology
DNA, Viral - isolation & purification
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - diagnosis
Registries
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
In Finland (population 5 million) the organised Pap screening programme for preventing cervical cancer has been in action already for 45 years. Women aged 30 to 64 are targeted (N 1.25 million) and the screening interval is five years. The programme invites women seven times in a lifetime; the attendance rate per one screening invitational round is 73%. The programme has affected markedly the cervical cancer rates in our country. During the decennia of its action there has been about 80% decrease in the age-adjusted cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates. The current age-standardised incidence rate is 4 and mortality rate 1 per 100,000 woman-years. In the current article we describe the organisational aspects of the programme; and pay attention to renovation of the programme taken place during the last decade when novel technological alternatives have been started to be used as the screening tests. By expanding the coverage and compliance of screening we still expect to increase the impact of the programme. Same time, efforts are needed to avoid overuse of services due to spontaneous screening, in order to decrease potential adverse effects and improve overall cost-effectiveness. A large-scale public health policy trial on Human papillomavirus (HPV) screening is on-going. Cross-sectional information available thus far suggests promising results. Follow-up of cancer rates after screening episodes are still required to evaluate optimal screening policies (e.g., screening intervals by age groups, and starting and stopping ages). We propose speeding up the use of modern technological alternatives in organised screening programmes.
PubMed ID
17600933 View in PubMed
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[Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia combined in pregnancy: diagnosis, management, outcomes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104105
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2014;60(3):263-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
E A Ul'rikh
E A Verbitskaia
A F Urmancheeva
V I Novik
N A Mikaia
G F Kutusheva
I V Berlev
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2014;60(3):263-6
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Colposcopy
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Humans
Patient care team
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Pregnancy outcome
Russia - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Cervical cancer is the leading gynecological tumor associated with pregnancy accounting for 1.2-4.5 cases per 10,000 births. Precancerous diseases of the cervix, which include cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of high severity (H-SIL) combined with pregnancy, are even more relevant since the frequency of their occurrence can achieve 5.0%. Besides the peak of dysplastic cervical changes occurs in the mean age at delivery in the Russian Federation (28 years). The features of diagnosis and management of these patients during pregnancy, delivery and postpartum require a multidisciplinary approach from doctors of different specialties.
PubMed ID
25033675 View in PubMed
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Changes in incidence of carcinoma in situ after the Chernobyl disaster in central Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23135
Source
Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 1995 Aug;29(2):266-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
J. Borovec
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of South Bohemia, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.
Source
Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 1995 Aug;29(2):266-9
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Ukraine
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The data files from an extensive cytological screening program for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia from a regional Czech hospital were analyzed. The data collection span is from 1985 to 1991 and shows highly significant maximum effects in the years 1988-1989, i.e., shortly after the Chernobyl accident. The increase was concordantly found in all the age categories, but the reaction seems to be faster in younger women. The delayed maximum effect (two years after the accident) also corresponds to the course of total foodstuffs burden and total-body activity.
PubMed ID
7661631 View in PubMed
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CIN 2/3 and cervical cancer in an organised screening programme after an unsatisfactory or a normal Pap smear: a seven-year prospective study of the Norwegian population-based screening programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17702
Source
J Med Screen. 2004;11(2):70-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
J F Nygård
T. Sauer
M. Nygård
G B Skare
S Ø Thoresen
Author Affiliation
Screening Department, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Montebello, 0310 Oslo, Norway. jan.nygard@kreftregisteret.no
Source
J Med Screen. 2004;11(2):70-6
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Mass Screening
Norway
Odds Ratio
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Time Factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2/3 and invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in an organised screening programme after an unsatisfactory or a normal Pap smear. SETTING: A seven-year prospective cohort study of the Norwegian population-based co-ordinated screening programme based on the actual diagnostic and screening procedures performed. Observations of 526,661 women with a normal index Pap smear and 21,405 women with an unsatisfactory index Pap smear were made during 3.26 million women-years. METHODS: The risk of being diagnosed with CIN 2/3 or ICC was calculated by logistic regression for the first two years of follow-up. The hazard of being diagnosed with CIN 2/3 or ICC for the women who were not diagnosed during the two first years was estimated by non-parametrical survival regression. RESULTS: After two years of follow-up, 0.2% of the women were diagnosed with CIN 2/3 and 0.01% with ICC after a normal Pap smear. An unsatisfactory Pap smear indicated a 1.6-4.0 times higher risk of harbouring a CIN 2/3 or ICC compared to women with a normal Pap smear. No increased risk of ICC was found during long-term follow-up for the 70% of the women with an unsatisfactory Pap smear who were returned to ordinary screening. Prior series of low-grade Pap smears followed by a normal Pap were associated with an increased risk of CIN 2/3 and ICC. CONCLUSIONS: An unsatisfactory Pap smear indicates a risk of harbouring CIN II/III or ICC. Repeated Pap smears are adequate as a follow-up of an unsatisfactory Pap smear. Women with repeated series of equivocal/LSIL Pap smears followed by a normal Pap should be considered at high risk.
PubMed ID
15153321 View in PubMed
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Colposcopic and histopathologic evaluation of women participating in population-based screening for human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid persistence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16790
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Sep;193(3 Pt 1):650-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Kristina Elfgren
Eva Rylander
Thomas Rådberg
Björn Strander
Anders Strand
Kirsti Paajanen
Inga Sjöberg
Walter Ryd
Ilvars Silins
Joakim Dillner
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. kristina.elfgren@karolinska.se
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Sep;193(3 Pt 1):650-7
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Colposcopy
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Papillomavirus, Human - genetics
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of colposcopic and histopathological findings in women screened for cervical human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid persistence. STUDY DESIGN: A total of 12 527 women, aged 32 to 38 years old, attending the population-based cervical cancer screening program in Sweden were randomized 1:1 to mock testing or human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid testing by general primer 5+/6+ polymerase chain reaction and subsequent typing. Human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid-positive women with a normal Papanicolaou smear (n=341) and an equal number from the control group were human papillomavirus tested on average 19 months later. One hundred nineteen women with type-specific human papillomavirus persistence and 111 controls were referred to colposcopy, and 84.8% attended. RESULTS: Histopathology from colposcopically directed biopsies confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or 3 in 28 of 100 of the women with human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid persistence and in 2 of 95 among controls. CONCLUSION: Among women with normal Papanicolaou smear attending population-based screening, the positive predictive value of human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid persistence for detection of biopsy-confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or 3 was 29%.
PubMed ID
16150255 View in PubMed
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Comparison of analytical and clinical performance of CLART HPV2 genotyping assay to Linear Array and Hybrid Capture 2: a split-sample study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269066
Source
BMC Cancer. 2015;15:216
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ditte Møller Ejegod
Matejka Rebolj
Jesper Bonde
Source
BMC Cancer. 2015;15:216
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
DNA, Viral - genetics
Denmark
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Genotyping Techniques - methods - standards
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Papillomaviridae - genetics
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - epidemiology - virology
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping has an increasingly important role in cervical cancer screening and vaccination monitoring, however, without an internationally agreed standard reference assay. The test results from the most widely used genotyping assays are read manually and hence prone to inter-observer variability. The reading of test results on the CLART HPV2 genotyping assay is, on the other hand, automated. The aim of our study was to directly compare the detection of HPV genotypes and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) by CLART, Linear Array (LA), and Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) using samples stored in SurePath.
Residual material from 401 routine samples from women with abnormal cytology was tested by CLART, LA, and HC2 (ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01671462, Ethical Committee approval: H-2012-070). Histological outcomes were ascertained by linkage to the Danish nation-wide Pathology Data Bank. For comparison of CLART and LA in terms of genotype detection, we calculated ?-coefficients, and proportions of overall and positive agreement. For comparison of CIN detection between CLART, LA, and HC2, we calculated the relative sensitivity and specificity for high-grade CIN.
The ?-coefficient for agreement in detection of genotypes 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, and 51 was =0.90 (overall agreement: 98-99%, positive agreement: 84-95%). The values were slightly lower, but still in the "substantial" range for genotypes 39, 45, 52, 56, 58, 59, and several low-risk genotypes. The relative sensitivity of CLART for?=?CIN2 and?=?CIN3 was not significantly lower than that of LA and HC2, although CLART showed a higher specificity than HC2.
In Danish women with abnormal SurePath cytology, CLART and LA were highly comparable for detection of most high-risk and low-risk genotypes; and CLART's sensitivity for high-grade CIN was comparable to that of both LA and HC2.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25886410 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.